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01-08-2003ConsolidatedPlanPMtg DRAFT I CITY OF LAS CRUCES FY2003-2005 CONSOLIDATED PLAN -PUBLIC FORUM 2 January 8, 2003 3 4 Following are the summary minutes of the City of Las Cruces FY2003-2005 Consolidated Plan - 5 Public Forum held on January 8, 2003, at 5 30 p.m. at Lynn Middle School, 950 S Walnut, Las 6 Cruces,New Mexico 7 8 Staff Present. David Carpenter(Community Development) 9 Leanne Waterman (Community Development) 10 Vera Zamora(Community Development) 11 Cheryl Rodriguez (Community Development) 12 Diana Carlson(Community Development) 13 Jim Carpenter(BBC Research & Consulting) 14 15 City Councillors Present: Dolores Archuleta 16 Steven Trowbridge 17 18 Public Present. Maggie Sequoia Christopher Brown 19 Ramon Placenas Ed Bacon 20 Marty Bacon Man Gutierrez 21 Kasandra Gandava Alfonso Guzman 22 24 I. INTRODUCTION,PRESENTATION AND PUBLIC COMMENTS 25 26 Jim Carpenter with BBC Research and Consulting introduced himself, along with City staff. t 27 Magdalena Giron(translator),and Councillors Dolores Archuleta and Steven Trowbridge were also 28 introduced. 29 30 Jim Carpenter then gave a powerpoint presentation of the Consolidated Plan. He explained that one 31 purpose of the consolidated plan was to identifyjunsdiction's housing and community development 32 needs, priorities, goals and strategies. The other purpose was to stipulate how HOME Investment 33 Partnership and Community Development Block Grant(CDBG)funds will be allocated to housing 34 and community development needs in the community Mr Carpenter stated the objectives of HOME 35 and CDBG Programs were 36 37 CDBG Benefit low-and moderate-income persons 38 Prevent or eliminate slums or blight 39 Meet other urgent community development needs 40 41 HOME Allow communities to custom design housing strategies 42 Strengthen business/government/non-profit partnerships 43 Build capacity of community-based housing groups 1 w I Jim Carpenter stated that the CDBG eligible activities are 2 Reconstruction/rehabilitation of homes or other property 3 Property acquisition for public purposes 4 Construction of public facilities and improvements 5 Demolition of property to prepare land for other uses 6 Provision of employment assistance 7 Provision of public services for youth, seniors or the disabled 8 Assistance with special economic development activities for for-profit businesses 9 Implementation of crime reduction initiatives 10 Assistance to low-income homebuyers in purchasing a home 11 Enforcement of local building codes to reverse housing deterioration and blight 12 13 Jim Carpenter then stated that the HOME eligible activities are 14 Home purchase or rehabilitation financing for rentals or homeownership 15 Construction or rehabilitation of units for rental or ownership 16 Site acquisition and improvements 17 Demolition and relocation expenses 18 Tenant based rental assistance 19 Requirement. 25%local match, 15%allocation to local Community Housing Development 20 Organizations (CHDOs) 21 22 Jim Carpenter asked the public participants what they thought the priority housing needs were in Las 23 Cruces and in their neighborhood. He also asked them what they thought the priority community 24 development needs were in Las Cruces and in their neighborhood. 25 26 Public stated the following housing and community development needs 27 Child abuse and substance abuse education 28 Affordable housing for owners and renters 29 Vacant homes are not being maintained or used 30 Parking enforcement 31 Good drainage for East Mesa 32 Street lights for East Mesa 33 Long range planning 34 Coordinating transportation and development planning (ex. bike transportation) 35 Bike lanes 36 Park facilities - enhance in general 37 Lack of pool/recreational facilities 38 Emergency housing for families 39 40 Jim Carpenter stated that the annual funding (approximation) FY2002 is as follows 41 CDBG Program 1.25 million 42 HOME Investment Partnerships Program $ 540,000 43 Estimated Total $1 8 million 2 I Jim Carpenter then gave a break-down of how the City spends HUD grants 2 Housing $936,000 3 Payment Saver 4 Home Rehabilitation 5 Individual Projects 6 Infrastructure $299,000 7 Street improvements 8 Street lighting 9 Public facilities 10 Planning and administration. $232,000 11 Homeless and HIV/AIDS programs $135,000 12 Public facilities $95,000 13 Other- $95,000 14 Youth and anti-crime programs 15 Employment training 16 17 David Carpenter explained that the Payment Saver Program is a down payment and closing cost 18 assistance program. It is administered by New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority The city plans 19 to allocate$460,300 of 2002 HOME and CDBG funds. It is available to first time homebuyers with 20 incomes under 80% of median (2000 median was $30,375) 21 22 David Carpenter explained that home rehabilitation provides loans and/or deferred loans for 23 restoration of homes to a safe and sanitary condition. Goals are to as low-income families with 24 extending the useful life of their homes,and to prevent and reverse neighborhood deterioration and 25 blight. It is administered by City Community Development Department. Only low-income 26 households are eligible After rehabilitation,the value of homes must not exceed 95 percent of the 27 median purchase price of single family homes in Las Cruces(2000 median was$91,200) $250,950 28 of HOME funds was allocated to this program in 2002 29 30 David Carpenter explained that infrastructure projects include street improvements,street lighting, 31 property acquisition, site improvements and soft costs for community facilities Such has been the 32 case with the A. Fielder Memorial Safehaven and the Eastside Community Center $299,000 in 33 CDBG funds was allocated to these projects in 2002 34 35 David Carpenter explained that other projects include 36 Construction of homes for low-income,first time homebuyer families(Communrt) Housing 37 Development Organization set-aside of$78,000) 38 Weatherization of homes ($50,000) 39 Homeless programs (soup kitchen, day care, transitional housing, medical supplies) 40 Public facilities(improvements to library,service center for disabled,employment assistance 41 center) 42 Youth programs (mentoring, safehouse, service coordinator) 43 $743,450 in HOME and CDBG funds were allocated to these projects in 2002 3 I Jim Carpenter then asked the public participants what strategies,currently used by the City,should 2 remain in place or expanded, what strategies should be reduced or eliminated, and what new 3 strategies should be adopted. Mr Carpenter asked the public participants to prioritize among these 4 strategies. 5 6 Public stated the following strategies 7 Package an assistance program to a particular neighborhood 8 Use of non-profit agencies 9 Do not reduce or eliminate 10 How are the amounts determined? 11 -Based on a priority table 12 Demolition of substandard structures 13 Lettering to explain who the individual is the park is named after 14 Too high proportion of money to administration 15 Recipients of funding need to be held accountable 16 Sweat equity 17 Bond issue 18 19 Jim Carpenter then thanked the public for their participation. 20 Forum ended at 7 00 p.m. 21 22 23 - 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 4 DRAFT I PUBLIC FORUM 2 FY2003 - 2005 CONSOLIDATED PLAN 3 January 8, 2003 4 5 6 Following are the summary minutes of the Public Forum Meeting, FY2003 - 2005 7 Consolidated Plan, held on January 8, 2003, at 1 30 p m at EI Caldito Soup Kitchen, 999 8 W Amador, Las Cruces, New Mexico 9 10 11 Staff Present: David Carpenter (Community Development) 12 Leanne Waterman (Community Development) 13 Cheryl Rodriguez (Community Development) 14 Maria Fahrenkrog (Community Development) 15 Robert Herrera (Community Development) 16 Linda Miramontes (Community Development) 17 Magdalena Giron (Inttra Services) 18 Jim Carpenter (BBC Research and Consulting) 19 20 Public Present: Jean McDonnell 21 Doug Raive 22 Gared B Cherry 23 Gabe Anaya 24 Rupert O Clark 25 Robert M Bailey 26 Carmen Garcia 27 Frank Amalla 28 Anna Waldschmitt 29 Oval E McNeeley 30 Brad Smith 31 Connie Daniels 32 Pamela Angell 33 Susan Campbell 34 Edward Pretzer 35 Delfina Zertuche 36 E Hope Bueno 37 Fran Clark 38 Evelyn Chapman 39 Mary E Slavik 40 Richard Salazar, Jr 41 Greta Swanson 42 Irene G Aguilar 43 44 1 1 I INTRODUCTION 2 3 Mr David Carpenter began the meeting with the introductions of City staff, Jim Carpenter 4 of BBC Research and Consulting, and Magdalena Giron, interpreter 5 6 Mr Jim Carpenter started the presentation by going over some background material 7 regarding the Consolidated Plan Mr Jim Carpenter stated that the Department of Housing 8 and Urban Development established the Consolidated Plan in 1995, and this requires the 9 community to help identify what the housing and community development needs are in the 10 City 11 12 Mr Jim Carpenter stated the City is in the process of doing a comprehensive study to try 13 to understand what those needs are Numerous interviews with individuals who are active 14 in the housing and community development world in Las Cruces, people who are building 15 houses, people who do social services, public officials and private developers are being 16 conducted We are also doing random telephone surveys and a group of students from 17 NMSU are doing door to door surveys in particular neighborhoods The other important 18 aspect of this are the public meetings being held during the next couple of days Mr Jim 19 Carpenter stated these are critical to enable the City to understand what the housing and 20 community development needs are in the City 21 22 The second part of the Consolidated Plan is to stipulate how HOME/CDBG funds will be 23 spent. The Home/CDBG programs are two federal programs that are linked to the 24 Consolidated Plan and in order for the City to receive the funds, the City needs to submit 25 a Consolidate Plan to HUD and have it approved 26 27 Mr Jim Carpenter went over the objectives of HOME and CDBG programs. He explained 28 that the CDBG program benefits low to moderate income households, prevents or 29 eliminates slums or blight and it also meets other urgent community development needs 30 The HOME program is really focused in developing and rehabilitating affordable housing 31 in the community Mr Jim Carpenter then continued to list the eligible activities under both 32 the HOME/CDBG programs 33 34 II PUBLIC INPUT 35 36 Mr Jim Carpenter divided the public up in two groups and asked them to discuss what they 37 thought the priority housing needs are and the priority community development needs are 38 of the City 39 40 After twenty minutes of brainstorming, each group discussed and listed what his or her 41 priorities were to everyone 42 43 The two group came up with the following priorities 44 2 1 1 Immigration housing 2 2 Shelters for men and women 3 3 Assisted living center for mentally ill/other handicaps and disabilities 4 4 More affordable housing 5 - furnishing (more apartments and less hotels) 6 - Services (education and training 7 5 Utility bills are high, i e , electricity, community action, etc. 8 6 Public restrooms/showers (NY and San Francisco style) 9 7 Transportation 10 8 Indigent Care 11 9 Safe day centers 12 10 Food commodities — no residency address 13 11 Drug prevention activities in low income projects 14 12 Detox centers 15 13 Medications 16 14 Work 17 15 Rehabilitate homes 18 16 Emergency shelters 19 17 Transitional/2nd stage housing 20 18 Affordable housing 21 - to own 22 - to rent 23 19 Special group housing 24 - mentally ill 25 - disabled 26 - veterans 27 - drug and alcohol rehab and halfway houses 28 20 SRO's for special groups 29 21 Cooperative arts and crafts (theater/music outlet for homeless/low income 30 persons 31 22 Job development— basic employment for homeless 32 23 Community garden 33 24 Lockers/storage for homeless 34 25 Alternative transportation — social service or direct stop van for City and 35 County 36 26 Summer programs— art, music, etc for low-income children & youth 37 27 Health Care 38 - mobile van units 39 - more days at St. Luke's 40 - more general services in town 41 - dental 42 28 Substance abuse treatment— halfway houses 43 29 Subsidize affordable apartments (to include pets) 44 30 Transitional living centers for people with mental health issues and physical 3 I health problems 2 31 Substance abuse treatment for drug/alcohol 3 32 More family transitional living shelters 4 33 Convalescent homes 5 34 Transitional living with emphasis on finding work 6 35 Transitional housing and affordable apartments need to be a priority 7 36 Increased support of filling prescriptions 8 37 Emergency shelters/long term 9 - Pet facilities 10 - Help transitioning to housing 11 38 Infill — encourage infill where low cost houses can be built 12 39 Clearing houses to steer people to resources 13 14 15 III HOW THE CITY ALLOCATES THE FUNDS 16 17 Mr Carpenter stated the City receives approximately 1 8 million dollars He explained how 18 the City divides up all that money by spending approximately $936,000 for Housing, 19 $299,00 for Infrastructures, $232,000 for planning and administration, $135,000 for 20 homeless and HIV programs, $95,000 for public facilities and $95,000 for other youth and 21 anti-crime programs and employment training 22 23 Mr David Carpenter explained the Payment Saver Program He stated this program 24 provides down payment and closing costs assistance and is available to first time 25 homebuyers with incomes under 80% of the 2000 median Mr David Carpenter explained 26 that this program is administered by the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority and the 27 City plans to allocate $460,300 of funds toward this program 28 29 Mr David Carpenter continued explaining the Home Rehabilitation Program This program 30 provides loans and/or deferred loans for the restoration of homes to a safe and sanitary 31 condition, which is administered through the City's Community Development Department. 32 This program is available only to low-income households, incomes below the 80% median 33 After the rehabilitation, the value of the home must not exceed 95% of the median 34 purchase price of single family homes. The City plans to allocate $290,250 of funds 35 toward this program, and there is funding still available from previous years Mr David 36 Carpenter stated they are proposing to change the handbook to allow other housing 37 programs sub-contract with the City and allow them access to this pool of money This 38 program is monitored through HUD and we must abide by their strict guidelines, which in 39 turn, takes up a tremendous amount of time to complete and meet. We also have a 40 $35,000 limit per household, with an additional $10,000 discretional limit. Mr David 41 Carpenter clarified under this program, we are not allowed to tear down a home and start 42 over, it is only for rehabilitation 43 44 Mr David Carpenter then went into the Infrastructure projects He stated these projects 45 consist of roads, paving, streetlights and public facilities improvements The amount of 4 I money spent in street improvements have been reduced to about $195,000, which is 2 substantially less than previous years Mr David Carpenter stated the street light funds 3 are to help light dark streets It is also used for property acquisitions, site improvements 4 and soft costs for community facilities, i e , A. Fielder Memorial Safehaven and Branigan 5 Library are receiving ADA Handicap improvements The City plans to allocate a total of 6 $299,000 to these projects 7 8 Mr David Carpenter continued explaining other projects that are also funded He stated 9 $78,000 was set aside for construction of low income homes for first time homebuyer 10 families which is a mandatory CHDO set aside Also $50,000 has been set aside for the 11 weatherization programs in collaboration with the Community Action Agency He explained 12 other programs funded include homeless programs, the soup kitchen, day care, transitional 13 housing and medical supplies Other programs are improvements to public facilities, 14 service center for the disabled, employment assistance center and youth programs The 15 City plans to allocate a total of$743,450 to these programs 16 17 18 IV PUBLIC INPUT 19 20 Mr Jim Carpenter now asked the audience to return to their respected groups and 21 strategize He asked the public to discuss what strategies currently used by the City 22 should remain in place, which ones should be expanded, which ones should be reduced, 23 eliminated or which new ones should be adopted He also asked the public to discuss how 24 they would prioritize these strategies and which ones should receive the most funding 25 26 After twenty minutes of brainstorming, each group discussed and listed what his or her 27 priorities were to everyone 28 29 The two groups listed the following 30 31 1 Education programs 32 2 Safe house 33 3 Youth programs 34 4 Construction for low income families 35 5 Homeless programs 36 6 Increase home programs (EI Caldito, St. Luke's, Community of Hope) 37 7 Utilities assistance with bills, cap utilities 38 8 Look for more government funding to supplement or replace 39 9 Exclude half the cost of the Payment Saver 40 10 Exclude street improvements 41 11 Weed and Seed 42 12 Rehab of housing 43 13 Support of homeless programs 44 14 Advising of home should be eliminated, it should be done at the banks from 5 1 the down payment program 2 15 Use other funds for streets and curbs 3 16 Alternative housing that is cheaper (adobe, straw bale, tire, etc.) 4 17 Do the developers control it? 5 18 Homes for people without homes—what about all the empty houses in town? 6 19 Reduce planning administration costs 7 20 Use funding for buildings for low income/homeless 8 21 Come up with program to help people build alternative housing that meets 9 codes 10 22 Finish Phase 3 of the Community of Hope 11 23 Confiscated drug houses used for the poor 12 24 Teaching the youth to build 13 25 More money for low rent projects — rent to own financial management 14 classes 15 16 17 V ADJOURNMENT 18 19 Mr Jim Carpenter stated that by attending these public forums it was a very important and 20 critical way for citizens to participate in this process Mr Jim Carpenter stated the next 21 chance to get involved is to attend the next public hearings on either March 19 or 20, 2003, 22 when the City will be presenting the draft action plan to the public. Once the draft plan is 23 completed, it will be available on the City's web-site Mr Jim Carpenter welcomed any 24 suggestions, comments or letters be submitted either by attending the public hearings in 25 March, mailing a letter to the Consolidated Plan at the City's mailing address or e-mail Ms 26 Waterman 27 28 Mr Jim Carpenter thanked everyone for attending and asked everyone to complete the 29 worksheet provided before leaving 30 31 Meeting adjourned at 3 30 p m 6 a , DRAFT 1 PUBLIC FORUM 2 FY2003 - 2005 CONSOLIDATED PLAN 3 January 7, 2003 4 5 6 Following are the summary minutes of the Public Forum Meeting, FY2003 - 2005 7 Consolidated Plan, held on January 7, 2003, at 1 30 p m at Branigan Library, 200 E 8 Picacho Ave , Las Cruces, New Mexico 9 10 11 Staff Present: David Carpenter (Community Development) 12 Leanne Waterman (Community Development) 13 Cheryl Rodriguez (Community Development) 14 Vera Zamora (Community Development) 15 Linda Miramontes (Community Development) 16 Magdalena Giron (Inttra Services) 17 Jim Carpenter (BBC Research and Consulting) 18 19 City Councilors Present: Steven Trowbridge 20 21 Public Present: Gissel Salinas 22 Brenda Greathouse 23 Mel Barlow 24 Yolanda M Borunda 25 William C Drouse 26 Julian Myers 27 Bill Wheeler 28 Rose Garrin 29 Win Jacobs 30 Terra Van Dyce 31 Brenda Maestas 32 Gary Koke 33 Daphne Decernea 34 Tom Andrews 35 Christopher W Sanchez 36 Aggie Oczon Saltman 37 Maryln Zahler 38 39 40 I. INTRODUCTION 41 42 Mr David Carpenter began the meeting with the introductions of City staff, Councilor 43 Trowbridge, Jim Carpenter of BBC Research and Consulting, and Magdalena Giron, 44 interpreter 1 I Mr Jim Carpenter started the presentation by going over some background material 2 regarding the Consolidated Plan Mr Jim Carpenter stated that the Department of Housing 3 and Urban Development established the Consolidated Plan in 1995, and this requires the 4 community to help identify what the housing and community development needs are in the 5 City 6 7 Mr Jim Carpenter stated the City is in the process of doing a comprehensive study to try 8 to understand what those needs are Numerous interviews with individuals who are active 9 in the housing and community development world in Las Cruces, people who are building 10 houses, people who do social services, public officials and private developers are being 11 conducted We are also doing random telephone surveys and a group of students from 12 NMSU are doing door to door surveys in particular neighborhoods The other important 13 aspect of this are the public meetings being held during the next couple of days Mr Jim 14 Carpenter stated these are critical to enable the City to understand what the housing and 15 community development needs are in the City 16 17 The second part of the Consolidated Plan is to stipulate how HOME/CDBG funds will be 18 spent. The Home/CDBG programs are two federal programs that are linked to the 19 Consolidated Plan and in order for the City to receive the funds, the City needs to submit 20 a Consolidate Plan to HUD and have it approved 21 22 Mr Jim Carpenter went over the objectives of HOME and CDBG programs. He explained 23 that the CDBG program benefits low to moderate income households, prevents or 24 eliminates slums or blight and it also meets other urgent community development needs 25 The HOME program is really focused in developing and rehabilitating affordable housing 26 in the community Mr Jim Carpenter then continued to list the eligible activities under both 27 the HOME/CDBG programs 28 29 30 II PUBLIC INPUT 31 32 Mr Jim Carpenter divided the public up in two groups and asked them to discuss what they 33 thought the priority housing needs are and the priority community development needs are 34 of the City 35 36 After twenty minutes of brainstorming, each group discussed and listed what his or her 37 priorities were to everyone 38 39 The two groups came up with the following priorities 40 41 1 Home Buyer counseling — long term 42 - Credit issues 43 - Supplemental funding sources 44 - 7,000 families 2 I - Qualifications for programs —families, staff 2 - Minor home repair capabilities 3 - Rehab needs includes weatherization 4 - Rehab codes (realistic) especially in Las Cruces, more money for more 5 people 6 - Rental stock 7 - Emergency shelter (1 time and long term) 8 - Replacement housing (Red Cross) 9 - Tenant-based rental assistance 10 2 Access to affordable land acquisition — City should use general funds for 11 street and sidewalks and leave CDBG for real needs 12 3 Neighborhood 13 - Infill development 14 - Some neighborhoods need rehab more than others do 15 4 First time homebuyers 16 5 Affordable housing 17 6 Emergency housing 18 7 Group homes — assisted living for the mentally/physically handicapped 19 8 Immigration issues 20 9 Cohesive housing policy for both the City and the County 21 10 Youth issues 22 - Education 23 - Employment 24 - Training 25 11 Elderly issues, especially for low income 26 12 Urban renewal 27 13 More information available to the public: 28 - information referral system 29 - clearing houses — listing everyone receiving public funding 30 14 Comply with legal standards 31 32 33 III HOW THE CITY ALLOCATES THE FUNDS 34 35 Mr Jim Carpenter stated the City receives approximately 18 million dollars He explained 36 how the City divides up all that money by spending approximately $936,000 for Housing, 37 $299,00 for Infrastructures, $232,000 for planning and administration, $135,000 for 38 homeless and HIV programs, $95,000 for public facilities and $95,000 for other youth and 39 anti-crime programs and employment training 40 41 Mr David Carpenter explained the Payment Saver Program He stated this program 42 provides down payment and closing costs assistance and is available to first time 43 homebuyers with incomes under 80% of the 2000 median Mr David Carpenter explained 44 that this program is administered by the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority and the 3 I City plans to allocate $460,300 of funds toward this program 2 3 Mr David Carpenter continued explaining the Home Rehabilitation Program This program 4 provides loans and/or deferred loans for the restoration of homes to a safe and sanitary 5 condition, which is administered through the City's Community Development Department. 6 This program is available only to low-income households, incomes below the 80% median 7 After the rehabilitation, the value of the home must not exceed 95% of the median 8 purchase price of single family homes The City plans to allocate $290,250 of funds 9 toward this program, and there is funding still available from previous years Mr David 10 Carpenter stated they are proposing to change the handbook to allow other housing 11 programs to sub-contract with the City and allow them access to this pool of money This 12 program is monitored through HUD and we must abide by their strict guidelines, which in 13 turn, takes up a tremendous amount of time to complete and meet. We also have a 14 $35,000 limit per household, with an additional $10,000 discretional limit. Mr David 15 Carpenter clarified under this program, we are not allowed to tear down a home and start 16 over, it is only for rehabilitation 17 18 Mr David Carpenter then went into the Infrastructure projects He stated that these 19 projects consist of roads, paving, streetlights and public facilities improvements The 20 amount of money spent in street improvements have been reduced to about $195,000, 21 which is substantially less than previous years Mr David Carpenter stated the streetlight 22 funds are to help light dark streets It is also used for property acquisitions, site 23 improvements and soft costs for community facilities, i e , A. Fielder Memorial Safehaven 24 and Branigan Library are receiving ADA Handicap improvements The City plans to 25 allocate a total of$299,000 to these projects 26 27 Mr David Carpenter continued explaining other projects that are also funded He stated 28 $78,000 was set aside for construction of low-income homes for first time homebuyer 29 families, which is a mandatory CHDO set aside Also $50,000 has been set aside for the 30 weatherization programs in collaboration with the Community Action Agency He explained 31 other programs funded include homeless programs, the soup kitchen, day care, transitional 32 housing and medical supplies Other programs are improvements to public facilities, 33 service center for the disabled, employment assistance center and youth programs The 34 City plans to allocate a total of$743,450 to these programs 35 36 37 IV. PUBLIC INPUT 38 39 Mr Jim Carpenter now asked the audience to return to their respected groups and 40 strategize He asked the public to discuss what strategies currently used by the City 41 should remain in place, which ones should be expanded, which ones should be reduced, 42 eliminated or which new ones should be adopted He also asked the public to discuss how 43 they would prioritize these strategies and which ones should receive the most funding 44 4 1 After twenty minutes of brainstorming, each group discussed and listed what his or her 2 priorities were to everyone 3 4 The two groups listed the following 5 6 1 Re-allocate half of the payment saver funds to housing development. 7 2 Foster partnerships to avoid duplication and/or incompetence 8 3 Model City Administrative role similar to MFA. (compliance/monitor/quantity/ 9 sub-contract the work) 10 4 Set goal (community wide) of 500+ units per year of• 11 - new homes 12 - new homeowners 13 - rehab units 14 - rental units 15 - weatherization 16 5 Commit to ongoing funding of homebuyer/financial literacy training 17 6 Promote fair lending — analysis for local lending 18 7 Develop policy of neighborhood specific revitalization efforts 19 8 Encourage City/Federal leverage of funds for all projects (Goal $1 00$10 00) 20 9 Infrastructure costs should be funded from other City funding sources 21 10 More funding for youth programs 22 - education/counseling services for teenage parents 23 - increase funding for at risk youth 24 11 More funding for elderly and disabled programs 25 - more assistance for transportation 26 27 28 V ADJOURNMENT 29 30 Mr Jim Carpenter stated that by attending these public forums was a very important and 31 critical way for citizens to participate in this process Mr Jim Carpenter stated the next 32 chance to get involved is to attend the next public hearings on either March 19 or 20, 2003, 33 when the City will be presenting the draft action plan to the public. Once the draft plan is 34 completed, it will be available on the City's web-site Mr Jim Carpenter welcomed any 35 suggestions, comments or letters be submitted either by attending the public hearings in 36 March, mailing a letter to the Consolidated Plan at the City's mailing address or e-mail Ms 37 Waterman 38 39 Mr Jim Carpenter thanked everyone for attending and asked everyone to complete the 40 worksheet provided before leaving 41 42 Meeting adjourned at 3 30 p m 5 DRAFT 1 CITY OF LAS CRUCES FY2003-2005 CONSOLIDATED PLAN -PUBLIC FORUM 2 January 7, 2003 3 4 Following are the summary minutes of the City of Las Cruces FY2003-2005 Consolidated Plan - 5 Public Forum held on January 7,2003,at 5 30 p.m.at Sunrise Elementary School,5300 Holman Rd., 6 Las Cruces,New Mexico 7 8 Staff Present. David Carpenter(Community Development) 9 Leanne Waterman (Community Development) 10 Vera Zamora(Community Development) 11 Cheryl Rodriguez(Community Development) 12 Diana Carlson (Community Development) 13 Jim Carpenter (BBC Research& Consulting) 14 15 City Councillors Present. Wesley Strain 16 17 Public Present. John& Eleanor Byers Leo G Paz 18 Ron& Suzanne Nesler Toni Flint 19 Daniel Bustamante Mary Moore Redford 20 Jovrta R. Vlieso Jack M. Nevarez 21 Honey Suenew Noe Ontiveros 22 Vicki Right Delina Bird 23 -B Briggs& A. Thomas Cynthia Holmes 24 Linda Cruse Miya Hoshhijo 25 Cheryl Savannah Martha Valdez 26 Victor C Fnas Michael Angel 27 Lmvell G Tisdale Richard Denman 28 Scarlett Ayres Cathryn Figunilli 29 Martin & Alvie Martinez Homer& Joan Snodgrass 30 31 32 I. INTRODUCTION, PRESENTATION AND PUBLIC COMMENTS 33 34 David Carpenter began the meeting with introductions of staff,Magdalena Giron,Jim Carpenter with 35 BBC Research and Consulting, and Councillor Wesley Strain. 36 37 Jim Carpenter then gave a powerpoint presentation of the Consolidated Plan. He explained that one 38 purpose of the consolidated plan was to identifyjurisdiction's housing and community development 39 needs, priorities, goals and strategies. The other purpose was to stipulate how HOME Investment 40 Partnership and Community Development Block Grant(CDBG)funds will be allocated to housing 41 and community development needs in the community Mr Carpenter stated the objectives of HOME 42 and CDBG Programs were 43 1 I CDBG- Benefit low- and moderate-income persons 2 Prevent or eliminate slums or blight 3 Meet other urgent community development needs 4 5 HOME Allow communities to custom design housing strategies 6 Strengthen business/government/non-profit partnerships 7 Build capacity of community-based housing groups 8 9 A citizen asked when would the door-to-door survey be completed. 10 11 Jim Carpenter advised that there was a door-to-door survey being conducted in many neighborhoods. 12 The reason for the survey is to target other low and moderate income areas. The survey should be 13 completed by the end of January 14 15 A citizen asked how a low- moderate income area is defined. 16 17 Jim Carpenter stated that depending on the household size,the income needs to be less than 80%of 18 the median income. Survey data will be able to tell us if a neighborhood is eligible for CDBG funds. 19 20 A citizen asked if some people don't answer the survey, would that factor in negatively for the 21 neighborhood. 22 23 Tim Carpenter stated they will factor"rio answers"' in the survey non-negatively 24 25 A citizen asked if everyone was being surveyed. 26 27 Jim Carpenter stated no,dust targeted neighborhoods 28 29 Jim Carpenter continued statmg that the CDBG eligible activities are 30 Reconstruction/rehabilitation of homes or other property 31 Property acquisition for public purposes 32 Construction of public facilities and improvements 33 Demolition of property to prepare land for other uses 34 Provision of employment assistance 35 Provision of public services for youth, seniors or the disabled 36 Assistance with special economic development activities for for-profit businesses 37 Implementation of crime reduction initiatives 38 Assistance to low-income homebuyers in purchasing a home 39 Enforcement of local building codes to reverse housing deterioration and blight 40 41 Jim Carpenter then stated that the HOME eligible activities are 42 Home purchase or rehabilitation financing for rentals or homeownership 43 Construction or rehabilitation of units for rental or ownership 2 I Site acquisition and improvements 2 Demolition and relocation expenses 3 Tenant based rental assistance 4 Requirement: 25%local match, 15%allocation to local Community Housing Development 5 Organizations (CHDOs) 6 7 Jim Carpenter asked the public participants what they thought the priority housing needs were in Las 8 Cruces and in their neighborhood. He also asked them what they thought the priority community 9 development needs were in Las Cruces and in their neighborhood. 10 11 Public stated the following housing needs 12 Home rehab/include mobile homes-justice on the current exclusion of mobile homes from 13 rehab grants 14 Revamp codes regarding modular homes 15 Gated community 16 Demolition of abandoned properties that contribute t local crime 17 One parent family housing 18 Plan for further development 19 Proper sequential numbering of addresses and marked streets (emergency crews/others get 20 lost) 21 More affordable low income housing (citywide) 22 23 Community Development Needs 24 Street improvements (paved roads, hot asphalt on Reynolds, paving Jefferson) 25 Storm drainage/flood control (improved drainage for Dunn)/sewer 26 Availability of natural gas 27 Codes enforcement 28 Parks (buffer areas)/playground facilities/pool 29 Recreation center improvements 30 Funding for collaborative youth organizations 31 Sidewalks (paved) 32 Community policing 33 Las Cruces Police Department sub-station 34 Graffiti removal 35 Add more fire hydrants (add more water links) 36 More police/fire personnel 37 A place for latch key kids to go for after school care 38 Street bumps - speeding on Hacienda and it is a danger for children and adults 39 Street light to lower crime (mixed opinion on whether or not lights are needed, almost all 40 at the meeting would go for decorative low lights) 41 Public transportation access and improvements 42 To preserve the current lifestyle and wildlife 43 Assistance in noise abatement from the highway 3 1 911 service 2 3 Jim Carpenter stated that the annual funding (approximation) FY2002 is as follows 4 CDBG Program 1.25 million 5 HOME Investment Partnerships Program $ 540,000 6 Estimated Total $1 8 million 7 8 Jim Carpenter then gave a break-down of how the City spends HUD grants 9 Housing $936,000 10 Payment Saver 11 Home Rehabilitation 12 Individual Projects 13 Infrastructure $299,000 14 Street improvements 15 Street lighting 16 Public facilities 17 Planning and administration. $232,000 18 Homeless and HIV/AIDS programs $135,000 19 Public facilities $95,000 20 Other- $95,000 21 Youth and anti-creme programs 22 Employment training -23 -, --- 24 -_24 David Carpenter explained that the Payment Saver Program is a down payment and closing cost 25 assistance program. It is administered by New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority The city plans 26 to allocate$460,300 of 2002 HOME and CDBG funds. It is available to first time homebuyers with 27 incomes under 80% of median(2000 median was $30,375) 28 29 A citizen asked if this program would assist a person owning land with a mobile home on it, but 30 would like to move the mobile home and build a home 31 32 David Carpenter stated that was not what this program was for However, they have used the 33 program for first time homebuyers buying existing lots with existing mobile homes on them. 34 35 The citizen asked if a person already had a mobile home and wanted to buy a modular home,would 36 that be considered first time. 37 38 David Carpenter stated that was a gray area that the bank could answer Sometimes a mobile home 39 is considered personal property (single-wide) and some times real property (double-wide) 40 41 The citizen asked who changes the rules on mobile homes 42 43 4 I David Carpenter stated the City Council and Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA) The City 2 generally dictates the rules to MFA. However, there maybe some instances where the MFA says 3 they cannot do something because it would be too complicated to change the program. 4 5 A citizen asked statistically, what percentage of mobile homes are in Las Cruces. 6 7 Jim Carpenter stated approximately 12%. 8 9 A citizen asked if 75% of the people qualifying as low median are all in mobile homes, then 10 shouldn't they be considered, especially in certain areas. 11 12 David Carpenter stated that was why there was a need for the door-to-door survey to identify the 13 neighborhoods that are low-moderate income areas. 14 15 A citizen asked why the City excludes mobile homes. 16 17 David Carpenter stated that at this point, he could not give a clear reason. However, from a 18 historical perspective,there has been an exclusion of mobile homes. Mr Carpenter stated he would 19 have to research it. 20 21 David Carpenter explained that home rehabilitation provides loans and/or deferred loans for 22 restoration of homes to a safe and sanitary condition. Goals are to assist low-income families with - 23 -extending the usefuT Iife of their homes,and to prevent and reverse neighborhood deterioration and 24 blight. It is administered by City Community Development Department. Only low-income 25 households are eligible After rehabilitation,the value of homes must not exceed 95 percent of the 26 median purchase price of single family homes in Las Cruces(2000 median was$91,200) $250,950 27 of HOME funds was allocated to this program in 2002 Current regulations do not authorize the 28 Home Rehabilitation Program that the City has to be used on manufactured or mobile homes. It is 29 for site-built homes only This is not preempted by HUD This is a historical regulation that the 30 Council has put in place previously and it has not changed. 31 32 David Carpenter explained that infrastructure projects include street improvements, street lighting, 33 property acquisition, site improvements and soft costs for community facilities. Such has been the 34 case with the A. Fielder Memorial Safehaven and the Eastside Community Center $299,000 in 35 CDBG funds was allocated to these projects in 2002. 36 37 David Carpenter explained that other projects include 38 Construction of homes for low-income,first time homebuyer families(Community Housing 39 Development Organization set-aside of$78,000) 40 Weatherization of homes ($50,000) 41 Homeless programs (soup kitchen, day care, transitional housing, medical supplies) 42 Public facilities(improvements to library,service center for disabled,employment assistance 43 center) 5 J 1 Youth programs (mentoring, safehouse, service coordinator) 2 $743,450 in HOME and CDBG funds were allocated to these projects in 2002 3 4 Jim Carpenter then separated the public participants into groups and asked them what strategies, 5 currently used by the City, should remain in place or expanded, what strategies should be reduced 6 or eliminated, and what new strategies should be adopted. Mr Carpenter asked the public 7 participants to prioritize among these strategies. 8 9 Public stated the following strategies 10 Current housing- $936,000 (reduction) 11 - Payment $aver Program 12 - Home Rehab 13 Expand to include mobile homes 14 Infrastructure 299,000 (increase) 15 - Street improvements 16 - Public facilities 17 Planning and Administration 18 - Cooperate with non-profits and other communities 19 Public facilities $95,000 (increase) 20 Homeless of HIV $135,000 (decrease) 21 - Push new funding of initiative for non-profits to allow them to address 22 needs 23 Other (youth,anti-crime, training) - increase funding to include a non-profit facility 24 Master Plan 25 Plan ahead to work priorities first and ask the residents if they are doing anything 26 Plan and fund infrastructures before building roads, etc to support future growth needs 27 Must change criteria for income and types of housing, to include mobile homes 28 Eliminate the city's strategy to reduce, ignore, and eliminate mobile homes 29 Change criteria for home improvement to include singlewide mobile homes. Some have 30 broken windows/doors (basic needs), roofs that leak 31 Affordable additional housing for below median income 32 Tax credits to build low income housing 33 Cost of building permits are too high and no accommodation to pay 34 Identify other funding sources for street improvements and sidewalks, etc if we don't meet 35 criteria 36 Adopt strategy to assist the poorest homeowner -the mobile home owner 37 Adopt a plan that makes street surfacing and addressing a priority 38 39 High priority- 40 Street paving (speed bumps)/drainage 41 Mail boxes and street addresses 42 Sewer 43 Home improvements for low income homes (including mobile homes) 6 I Moderate priority 2 Natural gas accessibility 3 Businesses,fobs 4 Grocery store 5 Low priority 6 Police/codes enforcement (noise and trash) 7 Fire hydrants 8 Lighting 9 911 map 10 Public transportation 11 No priority- 12 Homeless assistance 13 Real estate developer welfare 14 Library/public improvements 15 Youth programs 16 17 Jim Carpenter then thanked the public for their participation. 18 Forum ended at 7.25 p.m. 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 7