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May 17, 2016 B&P1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 MESILLA VALLEY METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES ADVISORY COMMITTEE The following are minutes for the meeting of the Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Advisory Committee of the Mesilla Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) which was held May 17, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. in Commission Chambers at Dona Ana County Government Building, 845 Motel Blvd., Las Cruces, New Mexico. MEMBERS PRESENT: George Pearson, Chair (City of Las Cruces Citizen Rep) Ashleigh Curry (Town of Mesilla Citizen Rep) Harold Love, proxy - Jolene Herrera (NMDOT) Mark Leisher (DAC Citizen Rep) James Nunez (City of Las Cruces Rep) Lisa Willman, proxy - Gabriel Rochelle (Bicycle Com Rep) Samuel Paz (Dona Ana County) David Shearer (NMSU - Environmental Safety) Lance Shepan (Town of Mesilla) MEMBERS ABSENT: Andrew Bencomo (Ped. Community Rep) (arrived 5:06) STAFF PRESENT: Tom Murphy (MPO) Andrew Wray (MPO) Michael McAdams (MPO) Zach Taraschi (MPO) OTHERS PRESENT: Aaron Sussman, Bohannan Houston Albert Thomas, Bohannan Houston Andy Hume, CLC Becky Baum, Recording Secretary, RC Creations, LLC 1. CALL TO ORDER (5:02) Pearson: So it's 5:02 and we have a quorum present so I'll go ahead and call this meeting of the MPO Bicycle/Pedestrian Facilities Advisory Committee to order. Um, why don't we go down the dais and introduce everybody, why don't we start at the end with Harold and say your name and who you represent. Love: Harold Love, New Mexico DOT. I'm proxy for Jolene Herrera. Nunez: James Nunez, City of Las Cruces. Willman: Lisa Willman. I'm serving as proxy for Gabriel Rochelle. Curry: Ashleigh Curry, Town of Mesilla Citizen Representative. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Shearer: David Shearer for NMSU Representative. Billings: Maggie Billings, Bicycle Community Representative. Paz: Samuel Paz, Dona Ana County. Shepan: Lance Shepan, Town of Mesilla. Pearson: George Pearson, City of Las Cruces Representative, and we have one more member looking for a chair. Leisher: Mark Leisher, the Dona Ana County Citizen's Rep. Pearson: Okay. 2. APPROVAL OF AGENDA Pearson: And first order of business is the Approval of the Agenda. I'll hear a motion to approve the agenda as presented. Shearer: I move to approve the agenda. Curry: Second. Pearson: There's a motion and a second to approve the agenda. All in favor, "aye." MOTION PASSES UNANIMOUSLY. Pearson: Any opposed? That approves the agenda. 3. APPROVAL OF MINUTES 3.1 April 19, 2016 Pearson: We're on to Approval of the Minutes for April 19th. Do we have some discussion on the minutes? I recognize Ashleigh. Curry: Thank you. I'm looking at page 8-9, line 3; it says University, it should say Union. Looking at page 21-22, line 33 says arrow; it should say lane. Page 26-27, line 28; it says facility, it should say fatality. Line, Page 29-30, line 14; it says hear a comma, I think it should say hearing none. That's all. Thank you. Pearson: Staff catch all those? Murphy: Yes sir. 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 Pearson: Any other comments on the agenda? Curry: Minutes. Pearson: Minutes, yeah, thank you. Um, I'll hear a motion to approve the minutes as amended. Curry: I'll put forth a motion. Pearson: Second? Shearer: Second. Pearson: Having a motion and a second to approve the minutes as amended, all in favor, "aye." MOTION PASSES UNANIMOUSLY. Pearson: Opposed? 4. PUBLIC COMMENT Pearson: And we move on to our next item, Public Comment. This is an opportunity for the public to comment. Do we have any members of the public that wish to come forward and address us with whatever their issues are? Seeing none. 5. DISCUSSION ITEMS 5.1 Missouri/Roadrunner Study Corridor Presentation Pearson: We'll move on to Discussion Items. Item 5.1: Missouri/Roadrunner Study Corridor Presentation. McAdams: Yes, we'd like to introduce Representative Aaron from, Sussman from BHI, Bohannan Huston to present the Missouri Avenue study. AARON SUSSMAN GAVE HIS PRESENTATION. Nunez: I have a question. You mentioned about the roadway suitability or something along those lines a few slides back. Did you consider the lighting along those paths because I'm not familiar with the lighting, how far it goes on some of these roadways close to the high school. 3 I Sussman: That's a good question. The short answer is no. The lighting is not a factor 2 in the bicycle suitability analysis nor is it a component of the level of service 3 but that is something that we could explore and certainly consider as part 4 of the, this set of recommendations for any of the preferred alternatives, is 5 that there be adequate lighting. 6 7 Nunez: The only reason I mention that or, or uh thinking about it is I wouldn't've 8 unless you'd mentioned the change in analysis of whatever the term you 9 used was um the, again towards that end of your presentation about, I was 10 just trying to think of what highschoolers could commute along that path. 11 And then the other part of your study, or what I was thinking was, is I saw 12 the red path along again I don't remember the name of the road that's close 13 to A Mountain there for a lot of people to be able to use that on their way 14 maybe to A Mount, A Mountain. I think that's a pretty popular destination 15 and because you pointed out this path that the only thing that you pointed 16 out is the destination is just, well other than enjoyment of going along those 17 roads is the high school. So what else is out there as a, as a goal or a 18 destination until it's developed more? 19 20 Sussman: Sure. Let me, so, speak to that final point. From a more local standpoint, 21 and really when we're talking about the bicycle and pedestrian access I think 22 sort of local access to the high school is, is more critical as, as critical as 23 anything. Providing the connections to Sonoma Ranch Boulevard is very 24 important from a regional connectivity standpoint. That's probably most 25 critical to motor vehicles. Though there are alternatives that exist obviously 26 along the existing roadway infrastructure, some of those paths are not 27 necessarily the most direct. One of the reasons why Missouri Avenue was 28 included not just in the long-range planning documents but as a, for the 29 alternatives for the study is that it's one of the few east -west corridors in Las 30 Cruces obviously that traverses the entire city. So that's, um extending that 31 connection and improving the regional motor vehicle connectivity is an 32 important part of that. But in terms of localized access, connections to the 33 high school from a bicycle and pedestrian standpoint I think would provide 34 an awful lot of benefit. 35 36 Nunez: All right. Thanks. 37 38 Curry: Well, yeah. I just, I don't have a question. I just have a comment. I think 39 it's great that you've done the level of service on it and I really wish that you 40 could just do that for our whole bike suitability map because I feel like that's 41 really hitting the nail on the head and I think that MPO and, and BPAC, we 42 should really look at, at doing that across the board for our next bike 43 suitability map update because I really think this is much more accurate 44 than, than what we have right now. So I just wanted to say thank you for 45 doing that assessment and it's maybe fuel for thought for our future map. 46 0 2 2 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Sussman: So um first of all thank you for um, for the comment. We are the, the level of service analysis is based on um a tool that was developed as part of the Transportation Research Board National Cooperative Highway Research Program. It's a publicly -available set of algorithms that can be used to calculate level of service. We, we'll make the offer at a future BPAC meeting, we're working with the Mesilla Valley MPO to conduct a workshop to utilize that tool. Again it is publicly available so we're building a tool that will allow the user to enter the individual uh conditions along a particular roadway. It's great as a diagnostic tool because it gives a sense of the existing conditions and also if, if conditions were, were improved in, in any number of different ways how the level of service might change. So we will make that offer available and we're happy to, the next time that we present to this Committee, follow up um and share any further analysis that we conduct to that effect. Curry: Thank you. 18 Shearer: I just have a few little questions on the level of service. What's the difference 19 again between the darker green and the dark green? 20 21 Sussman: The, so the, I'm, apologize for not kind of going through this in maybe as 22 much detail as I should have. The level of service from a bicycle standpoint 23 goes from A to D in this map, A being the, the highest quality infrastructure 24 is in the dark green. The lighter green, the kind of maybe highlighter green 25 is a level of service B, yellow is level of service C, and red is level of service 26 D. To give a sense for what a level of service D condition looks like, we're 27 talking about Roadrunner Parkway to the north of Lohman Avenue ... 28 29 Shearer: Right. 30 31 Sussman: Where I believe the traffic volumes are in the low 30 thousands, there's two 32 lanes in each direction, there are no bicycle lanes, no bicycle facilities so if 33 you were a bicyclist um it's probably not the most pleasant facility to bike up 34 and down. So it's technically possible but probably not advisable, whereas 35 a level of service um A such as the quality of the infrastructure near the 36 Farm and Ranch Museum, you're talking about five- or six-foot lanes, I think 37 a two- or three-foot bicycle buffer. The traffic volumes are not particularly 38 high. So all of those considerations function together. One of the reasons 39 that you'll see for example that Missouri Avenue is a level of service B as 40 opposed to a level of service A is the presence of, of on -street parking and 41 that can cause conflicts of course, um and so um that's a reality of going 42 through a neighborhood, that you're trying to accommodate lots of different 43 uses and needs but that conflict is, is one reason why that level of service 44 is lower in that particular location. 45 46 Shearer: Thank you. 5 1 2 Pearson: So on the level of service for bicycles do you consider topography at all? 3 Because like Missouri has that uphill piece there that can make it tougher. 4 5 Sussman: The short answer is no. I, 1 would consider that to be a, sort of an additional 6 consideration because now you're talking about not necessarily the, the 7 comfort level in terms of safety but in terms of the, the ease of use and ease 8 of use is not necessarily a consideration in this particular approach. 9 10 Pearson: Because when you're designing an, engineering a facility like, like Missouri 11 Avenue has that same kind of thing. On the downhill side you might just 12 make it a shared lane. On the uphill side you might make it a bike, a full 13 bike lane. 14 15 Sussman: Right. 16 17 Pearson: On the bicycle option, the Number 6, you had, can you bring up, where, you 18 just have the, the big blue line extending from Missouri all the way out to 19 Sonoma Ranch. Have you given any other consideration about maybe 20 dropping down on the backside of, on the west side of Centennial with being 21 able to connect more than one place there, maybe provide connection along 22 the Farm and Ranch Museum area or something? 23 24 Sussman: The short answer is no, but not because that's not an option but because 25 again this is more of a concept that has emerged ahead of the initial, ahead 26 of the consideration of alignments. So I think the next step in that particular 27 approach is to look at how to sort of maximize the connections so if you are 28 interested in improving the connections to the Farm and Ranch Museum for 29 example, that would be a necessity. Otherwise you're not providing any 30 change beyond the existing conditions. 31 32 Pearson: Right. 33 34 Sussman: So that's a very good question and that's something that we'll make sure 35 that um we consider as we, we flesh out this particular alternative more. 36 37 Pearson: Cause that, considering the destinations and how you want to connect 38 through them with the AdobeHenge in there that might become a focal 39 center and you don't necessarily want to drive all the way around in order 40 to get to it. You might want to just come out, connect from Dripping Springs 41 straight across to it someplace. 42 43 Sussman: Okay. Thank you. 44 45 Pearson: Any other comments? 46 on I 3 4 5 G 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Paz: I've, I have a comment. Is there any considerations to the level of service but for pedestrians? Sussman: That is possible through the tool that we have, that we have available. We have not done that to date but that is possible. Pearson: Okay. Anybody else? Thank you for the presentation. It's very informative and we like your maps. Sussman: Okay. Thank you. Thanks again. Shearer: Quick question. What's the timeframe involved here with your study? Sussman: Sure. We will present our um preferred alternative or preferred alternatives in a public meeting probably sometime this fall and our timeframe is to complete the Phase A study, the current study by the end of the year. And let me mention since you asked, if there are any additional questions or comments our a -mails are on, on the slides and then you may also contact us through one of the handouts which has each of the alternatives laid out for comments. We're, very much welcome any additional feedback that you may have. Thanks again. 5.2 City of Las Cruces Downtown Presentation McAdams: Thank you very much Aaron. And now we'd like to introduce Andy Hume to discuss about things that are going on in downtown -related circulation. ANDY HUME GAVE HIS PRESENTATION. Shearer: Well, excuse, was there, was there going to be medians on Water and Church Street like ... Hume: No sir. Shearer: No. All right, just yellow paint, okay. ANDY HUME CONTINUED HIS PRESENTATION. Leisher: I had a question about the back -in parking. Hume: Sure. Leisher: Is, are there example facilities that use that currently, in that configuration? Hume: Yes. 7 I Curry: Tucson. Leisher: In Tucson? Hume: There are, I, 1 believe Tucson, um I think Denver, Indianapolis. They're [� actually coming more and more popular ... 7 8 Leisher: Okay- 9 Hume: From the standpoint that a) you can get more parking than parallel, and it's, I 1 it's got a lot of safety benefits. I? 13 Leisher: So they don't see a lot of misuse of the facilities by left-hand turners parking 15 0 Hume: Well... 17 18 Leisher: In those slots? 19 20 Hume: There is some, I, as, as I mentioned on the slide there's going to be, need 21 to be some driver education but at the same time there's also a level of 22 enforcement because you're parked in the wrong direction, you're parked 23 against the flow of traffic. And so from an enforcement standpoint there's 24 going to need to be that along with the education. 25 26 Leisher: Okay. Thanks. 27 28 Love: Andy, was any, has any thought been given to a roundabout on the south 29 end? 30 31 Hume: Actually a roundabout was modeled and actually worked quite well. 32 However when we looked at um the, when we looked at proposed 33 redevelopment opportunities, roundabouts take a, an immense amount of 34 right-of-way and so when we're balancing redevelopment opportunities with 35. the benefits of a roundabout, it really fell in the direction of having a, a four- 36 way intersection. 37 38 Pearson: Ashleigh. 39 40 Curry: Andy, I have a, a question for you. I was a little confused by kind of how 41 you ended with the, the bike lane piece. Um, so you talked about the new 42 bike lanes that were put in by NMDOT on Main and then you know 43 continuing south of the, south ... 44 45 Hume: Hopefully. 46 I Curry: Hopefully at some point. And you talked about right now not having bike 2 facilities, being a share, you know share the road situation but then 3 ultimately maybe acquiring right-of-way to ultimately put in bike lanes again. 4 5 Hume: That, that option would be considered if we get additional right-of-way, yes. 6 7 Curry: So what I'm hearing is that ultimately you'd really like to see bike lanes. 8 9 Hume: I think bike lanes would be a good addition in the downtown area on Church 10 and Water. 11 12 Curry: So why not do it now? 13 14 Hume- Because right-of-way acquisition is incredibly expensive and the, the money 15 that we have right now has to go to the current phase that we have. lb 17 Curry: Okay. I understand that. So why not do it, the Option 2 where you have 18 parallel parking and bike lanes rather than back -in parking? 19 20 Hume: See if I ... 21 22 Curry: I think early on you showed us a, Option 2 ... 23 24 Hume: Yep. 25 26 Curry: That had bike lanes as well. 27 28 Hume: Yep. Here we go. I think that, well I'm, I'm going to, I'm going to, I'm going 29 to cheat on my first answer and that's what the Tax Increment Development 30. District Board went with as far as our options go. That's my cheat answer. 31 So what I'll do from, from a, that's an excellent question and I grapple with 32 that all the time, because I've had so many conversations with this Board 33 and individuals separately about inconsistency in bicycle facilities and you 34 know a, a good example is Triviz. We couldn't get bike lanes but share the 35 road on both directions was not really the way to go, especially on 36 southbound when you're going up hills and stuff like that, and so we went 37 with a, an asymmetrical facility. But from the standpoint of consistency it 38 tied in on the north end with bicycle lanes and it tied in on the south end 39 with bicycle lanes. It wasn't a, it wasn't a facility that just sort of began and 40 ended with no rhyme or reason to it and staff's perspective is that right now 41 that would be the situation, that we sort of would have bike lanes all of a 42 sudden appear in Church and Water and then disappear with no connection 43 to either end and so that was the, that was a big reason why. 44 45 Curry: But I thought that there were bike lanes now on North Main Street. 46 9 l 4 {i 1 lEf I] 1 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Hume: North of Picacho. Curry: Right. So north of Picacho, so which portion, so it, to me it sounds almost inconsistent that you have the bike lanes north of Picacho then coming into Water and Church with no bike lanes. Hume: Well but we also have a very large stretch between Picacho and the roundabout that'll also not have bike lanes. Curry: And so that's another question. Why would you not put in bike lanes in front of City Hall? Hume: I am, I am grappling with that on final design. I, I, 1 . - - Curry: Please put in bike lanes. Hume: I'm going to try. Curry: That, I mean just, that's a, a piece that I bike a lot and it would be really nice, especially coming out of the roundabout and I think people are, their heads are a bit dizzy and then they don't realize that there's also a bicycle there. So it'd be a really nice place to have a, you know. Hume: Let me, let me ask a question of the Board on this cause this was another aspect, it, this is sort of bringing back the, the conversations that we had. One of the things in, that, that we sort of grappled with too is the proximity of on -street parallel parking and the, and the bike lane being so close and they, essentially halfway into the door zone. We do, we don't have room to, to, to give a wider bike lane or a wider parallel parking lane so that was a, sort of another aspect so you're, you're going along, you're right next to traffic cause the bike lane I believe is only four feet. It's a, it's a minimal sized bike lane, and you're right next to the door zone of vehicles going, you know that are parallel parked. So you know that sort of factored in, again I'm trying to pull from my knowledge from my MPO days and a, and having talked with cyclists about being that close to parallel parking as well so that was, that was another aspect as well. I, I'm not ruling it out. I'm just saying the, the, the TIDD preferred Option 1. Curry: Right. Hume: In final design there may be other things that, that fall into the mix that ... Curry: Well and, and I think the truth of the matter is I feel really comfortable, Main Street is a really lovely street to bike down cause it's 15 miles an hour so you can just kind of take the lane and enjoy that scene, I mean really there are multiple options here so I don't think it has to be ... 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3.1 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 Hume: True. Curry: Super important because there is a way through with a, with a really nice bike -able area. Hume: And, and a, a question I'll ask, you know you, you Mr. Chair, I mean I, 1 realize this is a discussion item but if there is some sort of consensus that comes out of it that you would like to provide direction to me through final design, I'm not going to guarantee that it'll actually necessarily happen but we can introduce it into the discussion of final design. So if there is a consensus that maybe Option 2 which is that option, the other, you know what the other thing I'll, I'll mention too is there's like 60 fewer parking spaces available and you know with redevelopment in the area especially of a lot of the parking lots, parking is going to become increasingly a premium, so that was another consideration. Pearson: Right. The parking lots at Water and Griggs area, those have been dedicated to private ownership at this point, right? Or possibility of development that, but those get removed as public parking. Hume: Correct. Actually all the public parking lots are identified for future redevelopment so ... Pearson: Right. Hume: That's, that's just one of them. Good questions though, that's, that, we, we really, we really, I can tell you, I'm, I'm not exaggerating when I say we spent multiple meetings grappling with this issue. I've not even, that's not an exaggeration. Nunez: Mr. Chair, Mr. Hume. Think, I, 1 think you asked the key questions and, but I did have some other ideas before you brought out these key ones that, that we're talking about now. But the, what I was thinking of was, is the, the direction of, I, I, 1 do like the green, the dark green that shows where your, the paths that, I don't know if you've seen some of those that some of the places have come with to show and direct paths for the bicycle. I mean here you, you, we, we, we paint the lines and we paint them white and we show, but, but when I'm thinking of this I was thinking about the callecitas. This, well let me just ask the question. I was still wondering what the plan is for the Farmer's Market and how you would end up, cause you didn't get into it too much. Actually you've, you talked about it and then I was thinking about how you gonna develop those callecitas or you gonna to try to be, I, it's not the principal route for the bicycles or maybe it is but pedestrians are for, is it more for parking for the, the people who actually have businesses i there that are going to have additional parking along those callecitas? 1 2 guess I'm asking a few questions at once but ... 3 4 Hume: So this is an artist's rendition of, of the callecita we looked at at, between 5 Coas and Woolworth. So let me see if I can, I can answer your question. 6 We are, we are not immediately proposing any vehicular traffic or parking. 7 We are proposing that they remain right now at least open to walking and 8 biking, bicycling only at this point. Obviously there has to be access for 9 emergency vehicles and so on and so forth. 10 11 Nunez: No the ... 12 13 Hume: The, the ... 14 15 Nunez: That image helps a lot. 16 17 Hume: Yeah. 18 19 Nunez: I, 1 missed that. 20 21 Hume: Okay. Well no, no, no. I didn't show you the image. Yeah, that's, that was, 22 that, I, 1 sort of, I sort of kind of glossed over the callecitas to, to talk more 23 about Church and Water but um basically what we want them to become 24 are active spaces. So if you have, and in this particular example you can 25 see, um it may be difficult to see but this is a doorway in the side of what is 26 Coas. Perhaps this is a coffee shop or a little cafe, somebody can you know 27 get their coffee, come outside, sit, there may be opportunities for, like right 28 now the Main Street Bistro has the outdoor seating. Some of you probably 29 have been there before. They actually rent that from the City so, so that 30 there are opportunities to lease those spaces, maybe if you want to have 31 like a little outdoor cafe where you serve alcohol, you have to have that 32 fenced off. But basically what we want them to do is we, we want them to 33 be spaces where people meet and greet and gather. Let me, let me see if 34 1 can answer really quickly your Farmers and Crafts Market question. 35 Saturday they're going to stay where they're at. They have like over 300 36 vendors and so they're not really, we don't really have space for them to go 37 anywhere else. On Wednesday they will, they will probably occupy the 38 plaza. 39 40 Nunez: Very good, thanks. And then um kind of a sub -question, I was trying to 41 visualize, I'm sure you're handling it with the engineers or whatever but the 42 drainage through there, I'm kind of curious how it is. Is it okay? Is it a 43 drainage issue? Well you, well go ahead. 44 45 Hume Yeah. There, there's, there are drainage issues. It's sheet flow, I mean it's 46 so, yes, it's, probably everybody knows it's basically pretty much flat in that 12 I area being the river bottom, or former river bottom. So um you know we're 2 going to have to, as we work through this, actually if, if memory serves the 3 design that the, um that is being proposed by a local architect is the area 4 that sort of looks like the river going through that, which it's supposed to 5 signify the river was going to be slightly tapered so that water will probably 6 go through that area um predominantly so it'll leave the other, the rest of the 7 area a little drier. We were also looking for opportunities for green 8 infrastructure in these areas as well, storm water capture and the like. 9 10 Nunez: Very good. Thank you. 11 12 Pearson: Any other Committee Members? 13 14 Willman: Have you considered parking that would be away from the curb so, um I just 15 finished a book by Janette Sadik-Khan. She was the planner that 16 redesigned the New York City streets and her idea was to put the parallel 17 parking eight feet from the curb and put the bike lane between the curb and 18 the parking and then the two drive lanes. Is there a possibility of doing 19 something that radical? 20 21 Hume: The, you know the, what you're talking about is very similar to what is done 22 all over Europe, called a cycle track. It's very similar to that where you, 23 where you have that additional buffer away from traffic but you also have 24 some separation from the pedestrian traffic. Um I would have to say at this 25 point in time again given the right-of-way constraints that we have, probably 26 not, but as we look forward to hopefully getting additional right-of-way we 27 want to make sure that we provide the best possible environments, 28 particularly for pedestrian, the, this was a very interesting conversation I had 29 with the engineers working on the project. If you design for pedestrians first, 30 everything else will be great. You won't have to worry about a single other 31 thing. Design for pedestrians first. So with that in mind that's sort of the 32 way that we're trying to approach this entire project. That particular item 33 has not come up in discussion but I can certainly bring it up in our, in our 34 final design discussions. 35 36 Willman: Thank you. 37 38 Shearer: You mentioned 25 mile an hour at times, but I think at times I thought you 39 also said 20 mile an hour. Is there a consideration for that speed limit? 40 41 Hume: That's one of the things that we're looking at is a lower design speed so that 42 the design speed is actually 20 miles an hour instead of 25. Just even that 43 five mile an hour difference would make a huge change in the pedestrian 44 and bicycle environment, and also a huge environment in people who want 45 to sit along an outdoor cafe and, and enjoy the evening. I'd, I don't know 46 again if you, if you've been to Main Street Bistro it's really the best example 13 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Shearer: 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 that I have, the only example I have. When cars are actually going 15, you can carry on a conversation just fine. When they're even going a little bit faster than that the wheel noise goes up, the engine noise goes up, and it's very hard to hear the person sitting next to you. So uh anything that we can do in that, in that sense to uh work with a lower design speed is what we're going to be shooting for. Okay. You're also changing the circle as you go towards the south end. Are there going to be additional traffic lights on Lohman and Amador or ... Hume: There will not be additional traffic lights on Lohman and Amador. Those will, those lights will remain. The, there were two scenarios in the, in the traffic study. There was the "Opening Day" scenario which will happen probably mid-2018 and then there was the, the "20 or 25 Year" scenario. In the "Opening Day" scenario there will be stop -controlled intersections as, on Bowman as you come to Main. Main will be the through street at Bowman kind of like it is now and then you would have stop control coming in. Eventually we may need to do a four-way stop at that intersection but we're, we're really working hard to try and remain, keep people um in the same conditions that they're used to driving at this point in time and that will, we think "Opening Day" that that will be the configuration. Shearer: Okay. Billings: I just have a quick comment. I think this is really wonderful. I bike downtown frequently and I think that with Las Cruces or not Las Cruces Street, Main Street being so bike -accessible I'm not too worried as a bicyclist about Church and Water being super -accessible so I think that the more parking would make more sense just because if you don't have that parking then people will start parking in places like that anyway and will just block bike access. So I think that it's a really good option but I don't think that bike access on Church and Water is too horribly important. Hume: Okay. Thank you. Pearson: Right. I think, when I first saw the design for the bicycle I saw a door -zone bike lane and so that worried me. As an experienced cyclist I know that well that means I'm going to have to ride out on the lane line next to traffic anyways and inexperienced cyclists are going to be in danger of being doored by the, the doors so this, doing the traffic calming with the back -in parking and because of the destinations involved too and the choices, that all makes sense to me that Church and Water with the Option 1 that was selected is a, a good, good choice and maybe look at the 20-mile-an-hour design. The parts that concern me a little bit more are North Main Street roundabout section where just as you described we have a wonderful new facility, NMDOT bicycle facilities on Main Street and then what happens. I 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 think it's very important that we do bicycle design of some sort, accommodation for bicyclists up to the roundabout, whether that means traffic calming, whether that means bike lanes, whatever. We need to consider that that's where the bicycle, that's going to be the problem area for bicycles. Hume: As a former rider through there, completely agree with you. Pearson: So if you need some support from this Committee on that, I think we could probably come up with that. Hume: Okay. Thank you. Pearson: The other area that hasn't really been talked about that concerns me is Las Cruces Avenue. The M, Transportation Plan includes the Hadley Avenue Bike Boulevard, so that extends all the way from Triviz to Motel Boulevard in concept. And that's all it is, is right now is in concept. And right through downtown on Main, on Las Cruces Avenue is where you're going to have bicyclists because it's going to be the only choice for connectivity. That's how, I ride it twice a day when I'm going to work because that's the only choice. And that was one of the main reasons, connecting the two neighborhoods. It'd be wonderful if the City considers, does the bike boulevard aspects of the design whether, I know maybe the Hadley Boulevard, Bike Boulevard they can't implement it yet but if they do the design work and make the decisions that this is where this should be, it seems like it's going to end up at Mesquite and Mesquite's going to go down to Las Cruces and cross through until it connects back up to Hadley. And if we implemented that as part of this design process it seems important to me. Hume: Thank you very much for that comment Mr. Chair and, and that actually was a comment that MPO provided to us as well in the preliminary design process. Um, one thing that I'll ask and, and this is a perfect opportunity to ask this. What would you suggest different than the, the typical design that would, that is being offered here? Because usually a bike boulevard does not have specific bike lanes. It does have narrower travel lanes. The other part of this is that the sidewalks are going to be widened so the entire, the actual roadway part of the right-of-way is going to be dramatically narrowed from what it is today. And, and Mr. Chair I would be happy to take back any ideas that you would have that would help better implement that. Again it, it falls within the context of the entire plan bringing people to downtown rather than through downtown. Pearson: Right. Well riding it as it, in its current configuration there's generally not parking, people are generally not parking in the parking on Las Cruces Avenue. That of course changes on market days. 15 1 2 Hume Sure. 3 4 Pearson: But during the typical times that I'm riding through there there's enough 5 wiggle room and then you get to the four-way stop at, at Main Street and 6 La, Las Cruces Avenue. Um, depending on how wide you want to make 7 those sidewalks I would take consideration of maybe no parking on Las 8 Cruces Avenue from, between Church and Water. 9 10 Hume: Okay. 11 12 Pearson: I had thought previously that Main Street is 15 miles an hour, Las Cruces 13 Avenue should be 15 miles an hour between Campo and Alameda or 14 something like that. 15 16 Hume: Okay. 17 18 Pearson: And that'll also accommodate, use traffic calming for bicyclists but that's 19 where not being an engineer we do need a ... 20 21 Hume: Sure. 22 23 Pearson: Good design philosophy on how to handle that but that's, accommodating 24 bicycles on Las Cruces Avenue and the Hadley, the North Main and 25 roundabout sections of the project I think are the two things that you really 26 need to concentrate on. 27 28 Hume: Absolutely. I, 1 appreciate those comments. One of the things that I'll, I'll 29 submit to you all, I know Silver for instance is a bicycle boulevard in 30 Albuquerque. What we can do is we can take a look at that and see you 31 know what design elements are different than what we're proposing for Las 32 Cruces there may be other more, more refined designs that are available. 33 So we'll work with MPO as well as with the um engineers on the project to, 34 to refine that. 35 36 Pearson: Okay. Any other ... 37 38 Curry: Yes. Andy I have, I have just one thought. This is, um it's maybe easier to, 39 to see it in sort of a sketch but this is one of the things that they do in the, 40 I've seen in, done in Zimbabwe in Africa is that the parking is, is in the middle 41 of, in the middle of the street and so you'd have cars, bicycles, pedestrians 42 and then that parking is accessed from either side here and I don't know 43 how much width that takes but you'd fit in a lot of parking because it is similar 44 to the, not to the parallel but to the back -in parking, that you just line the 45 middle of the street with parking. 46 16 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Hume: Okay. Curry: And then you have a travel lane, bicycles, and they're not anywhere near the cars parking. They're between the cars driving, I don't know. Have you ever seen anything like that? Hume: Um, I have never seen something like that. So we'll take a look at that and see what, maybe that option would be available. Curry: I don't know. I, it, it just seems like then cars can access that center parking from either, from either direction and it keeps the bicycles really out of anything to do with parking. Hume: Okay_ Leisher: But then the passengers have to cross traffic to get over. Curry: Yes, they do. And if you're going at 15 miles an hour that's okay. Leisher: Yes, could be. Curry: But that's true. Yeah. Pearson: And my other comment that may not be directly part of the project or not but bicycle parking in the downtown area. We need sufficient bicycle parking. I, anecdotally of course but having attended the Zombie Walk and the, the New Year's Eve celebration, coming home from those, walking through the callecita area, there's a pile of bicycles just kind of in the corner there cause there's no place else to park. So we need appropriate bicycle parking it seems. My suggest, my thoughts are that every business should have room for two or four bicycles so, to be parked. When I go to ... Hume: Okay. Pearson: Go to the Enterprise Center where you have your presentations I end up parking on the bike, on the, on the seating, the ... Hume: Okay, Pearson. The benches there because there's no bike parking and the mentality of the cyclist is, "I'm riding my bicycle. I want to be able to park close to my destination." Hume: Sure. Pearson: And that "close" means within viewing distance of the destination. 17 1 2 Hume: Mr. Chair. I, 1 appreciate those comments very much. There, there's a, 3 there's a couple of schools of thought on that. One is do you put a, a parking 4 spot in front of every single business or do you cluster them at various points 5 along the way. I think that's, that's something that I would love to work with G if, if there's maybe some individuals who'd like to provide some input on that 7 or, or help out with some of that. The other thing is how, it, it, it's, it's 8 somewhat a similar situation as we get into with automobile parking. How 9 much do we provide, at what points in, at, at, where, where do we provide I t) them, and you know I, I, 1 think, I think it would be a really cool thing is we, 1 I if we could for special events bring out parking that is movable ... 12 13 Pearson: Right. 14 15 Hume: To, to an extent. It's like heavy, you're not going to actually take the bikes 16 with you. But because if, a lot of times if you go down during the day there 17 are no bicycles parked. When we have special events a lot of bicycles are 18 parked. So is there some opportunity for flexibility? So those are sort of 19 two schools of thought that are going on right now um and I'd be, I'd really 20 enjoy input if possible from ... 21 22 Pearson: Right. One ... 23 24 Hume: A, a, a Membership of this Committee. 25 25 Pearson: A thought is the, the bike corral kind of thing that's portable, it just takes up 27 a bike's ... 28 29 Hume: Sure. 30 31 Pearson: Parking space instead of one car you've got room for 12 bicycles to park. 1 32 had another thought but now I don't remember. 33 34 Billings: I think the bicycle corral would be a really good idea or my vote for bike 35 parking, for permanent bike parking would be parking at every business, 36 just a few bikes because you, or like a few spots because just generally you 37 don't want to leave your bike too far from where you are because it gives 38 somebody more time to you know. You get worried about people stealing 39 or something. So on NMSU's campus they have sort of a similar thing, like 40 there are bike, there are places to park your bike outside of every hall, 41 lecture hall and I think that that works really well so I think something like 42 that downtown would be really nice. 43 44 Pearson Right. I think the other thing that I thought of, I'd seen the demonstration 45 that that also extends to the motorcyclists because I've seen parked on the 46 sidewalk in front of the Main Street Bistro's the motorcycles all lined up. 18 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 I7 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Hume: Yeah. Pearson: So that should be bike parking instead. Hume: Fair enough. Pearson: Any other comments? Thank you. Hume: Thank you all very much. McAdams: Thank you Andy, thank you Andy for that wonderful presentation. 5.3 Committee Training - Committee Responsibilities McAdams: And let me go to my, mine right now too. Pearson: So we're at Committee Training - Committee Responsibilities. MICHAEL MCADAMS GAVE HIS PRESENTATION. Nunez: Mr. Chair. I was, you did mention the vehicles. Is, do you guys deal with the rail? McAdams: We, well, indirect, not rail as far as rail transportation you know, you know inner, inter -city like, no we, in interactions like that we look at how, like for example the railroad crossing, bike trails and you know the bike lanes the DOT generally deals with those through, and (inaudible) cities do. We're dealing, we have liaison with the RTD, that's talking about the commuter rail, it's (inaudible), you know we provide support but we're not in direct, you know in that study as far as directing the study. But I think we do in, and we have the other things like trucks, we, one thing we're looking at is the travel demand modeling and (inaudible) travel and that's very important. So we have a lot of responsibility being, and I guess I could get, multimodal also includes rail I think and also trucks as well. Okay. Nunez: All right. Thanks. McAdams: You're welcome. Pearson: Any other comments? Okay. Thank you for that. McAdams: Thank you too. 6. COMMITTEE AND STAFF COMMENTS 19 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 !1 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 3.3 34 35 3.6 37 38 39 44 41 42 43 44 45 46 6.1 MPO Staff Update Pearson: We're on to Item 6.1: MPO Staff Update. Murphy: We don't have any updates. 6.2 Local Projects Update Pearson: Local Project Updates. City of Las Cruces. Nunez: I was looking at our list and just as I reported last month is uh we're mainly doing maintenance. So it, and we're pretty much done with a lot of those roads as many of you have, may noticed. So they're just restriping those and they're, they haven't really changed any of the striping actually. We think we discussed that last month also. And then they are building the dam trails. They're on that project. I don't know if any of you've seen any of that progress but I know they started that construction. Pearson: Yeah. Maybe we could get a map of that by the time that that project's completed. Nunez: I know I've seen the drawings, you mean a map? Oh, I see what you're getting at I think. Go ahead, can you expand on that? The map, you talking about the, kind of the bicycle maps ... Pearson: No, just of the ... Nunez: Saved for the ... Pearson: Project for the, the dam trail ... Nunez: Oh, okay. Pearson: Things, facility cause I, well, well I think I saw it during the TAP application process but by the time the project's done and we're ready to announce that it's open, have a map so that it shows where to go, how to get to it. Nunez: Okay. Good. Pearson: Okay. Town of Mesilla have any updates for us? Shepan: No sir. Pearson: NMSU? Okay. 6.3 NMDOT Projects Update ►W1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Pearson: NMDOT. You have to turn it on. Love: Okay. I, 1 can give you what I, 1 know off the top of my head. 1-25/Missouri, contractor's looking, pushing to complete that project by the end of this month, substantial completion. 1-25, no 1-10 over Union and Ramp E the bridges replacement; contractor's looking at completing that project by the end of June and then Mountain States is currently continuing the paving on 1-10 basically from up at the Love's, the Airport interchange all the way to the Texas state line. That work is continuing, that pavement preservation work. Pearson: And that work's mostly being done at night? Love: Yes. And, and we just had a, which probably everybody'd be interested on this Committee, we just had a kickoff meeting for our study on US-70/Main Street from Solano all the way to 1-25 and one of the things we're looking at is whether it needs to be six-laned or the feasibility of six-laning it. So that's a study that just, just got, we just had a kickoff meeting and of course we'll be looking for all the public input and, and input from committees like this. And that's it. Pearson: Okay on the Missouri project now that it's, the lanes are mostly done, notice that it's quite narrow. I wonder about if we need some "Bicycle May Use Full Lane" especially on Triviz or if there, have any comments on, on that. Because at some point that's going to get turned over to the City also so I don't know if it's an NMDOT issue or a City issue to look about that. Love: Um, I'm not quite sure what you mean by "narrow." Pearson: Well, Triviz heading north for example, it, as you cross Missouri it's probably a 12-foot travel lane between the, the curb and gutter. Love: Yes. Pearson: And so that's not enough room for a bicycle and a vehicle to share. Love: I, 1 think it was the understanding to my, correct me if I'm wrong, that the multiuse path was for bicycles and pedestrians. Pearson: But there's an in -the -road facility that picks up immediately after that area so you're going to have people, bicycles in the roadway there. So I wonder, I'm wondering about warning drivers that bicycles belong. Love: I'll, I'll pass that on to the project manager. 21 1 Pearson: Okay. Andy. Hume. Mr. Chair. Um that stretch of Triviz is going to be under City operations and so that's something also that the City can look at if, if that's, if there's a warning sign that's needed at that point. Pearson: Okay. 7. PUBLIC COMMENT Pearson: Okay. So now we're on to item seven: Public Comment. Any further public? Go ahead. Hume: Real quick, the City of Las Cruces is looking at the potential for a TAP funding project. One of the ideas that we're looking at is a bike sharing program. We're just very much in the initial discussions of that and we want to make sure to cooperate with anything that NMSU is doing, especially looking at connecting NMSU with downtown. So just wanted to let you all know that, that we're working with our, our colleagues over at NMSU so. Pearson: Okay, good. Yeah, I think one of the things through my Facebook pages or whatever is the ideal is you pick your bike share stations now as part of the design of whatever infrastructure you're adding to the area so that's very opportune time now I think for that. Okay. I guess, do we have any other Committee comments, Committee Members? Ashleigh. Curry: I wanted just to note last BPAC meeting we talked at length about the City Loop Trail and it was brought to our attention from the MPO that the Town of Mesilla and the County were at an impasse with working with EBID and so what we had previously seen as an option, specifically going north -south through the Town of Mesilla, um we had liked the options that were being proposed in earlier meetings that we could use the EBID laterals, and we were told at the last meeting that we could not use that and that was no longer really an, on the table as an option. And so I met with the Town of Mesilla with one of the Trustees and with the Mayor and also with Debbi Lujan and they, there was a misunderstanding there. They said that they were very happy to work with EBID, they really hadn't looked into it in detail but I did get an e-mail yesterday from Linda Flores that she had got the contract between the City and EBID to look over herself and would take it to the Mesilla lawyers just to kind of make sure that the Town of Mesilla would like to continue to use that as an option. And I know that the MPO staff is aware of this but I just wanted to make the rest of the BPAC Committee aware of that. And I have had e- mails trying to set up a meeting with the County with Chuck McMahon the Assistant Manager and we haven't yet met but um I did mention it also at the Bike Month Proclamation in front of the County Commissioners that we 22 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 would like to revisit the idea and not have this topic closed off, to be able to use the EBID laterals and they said that that was part of their long-range plan as well and so they didn't seem shut off to that. So I think that there was a miscommunication at some point along that, but I'd really like to make sure that we don't move ahead with the City Loop planning without, without considering the EBID idea. I think several Members of the Committee at, I think last time really felt that the loop isn't complete if it's in -road, if it's using in -road facilities where theoretically we would be able to use laterals like the City's used for the Outfall Channel and the La Llorona and the Triviz pieces. So I just, I, 1 know that some people are aware of that but just to bring it to the attention of the Committee that that, that I did have that discussion with the Town of Mesilla. Thank you. Pearson: Right. And I did feel that maybe we should revisit the Trail Plan, maybe what we adopted or suggested, forwarded as a suggestion from, recommendation from this Committee was constrained by the thought process of where we could build something. I think we should do the Trail Plan without those constraints and say, "Where, where would the ideal Trail Plan be?" And then later we can come back and visit, revisit real life but um I think without, we need a Trail Plan that would be the best view from this Committee and from what citizens could use because promoting bicycles we, you know we've got the, what was our phrase for the, the advanced cyclists. But it's, those people'd be out there on the bicycles no matter what, it's the people that, "Well I don't want to go out on a bicycle because it's dangerous." And these are the kinds of facilities ... Curry: Enthused and confident. Pearson: That, enthused and confident. We want the unsure and untrustworthy of motorists kind of thing, we want them to get on their bike and start riding their bicycles and once they do they'll, they can move into the more enthused and more confident category. Any other Committee Members have a comment? The other thing I wanted to ... William: George, Pearson: Okay, go ahead. Willman I've got a question for Mr. Love. I have, I host cross-country bicycle tours pretty regularly and the Adventure Cycling route goes from, up Highway 28 and then north on um 85 up to Hatch. So most of my guests are on that route, but there's about 25% of the bicycle riders that come into town from the west or they're going west along 1-10. And I have heard stories from every single one of my guests about pieces of steel that are on the side of the road, so there, there is no other road to ride on so they're on the shoulder 23 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 of 1-10 and it is littered with debris. So my question is: How often is that shoulder swept and is there a way to possibly prioritize that maintenance? Love: That's the never-ending problem we have with our roadway facilities, especially the interstate is keeping it free of debris not only litter but also keeping it, because we are aware that the, you're allowed to bicycle on the rural interstates. So, so that is one of the things that's part of our maintenance and it's, it's just, we're always playing catch-up. It's just a, we, we just don't have the money and enough sweepers and enough manpower to keep it up the way it probably should be kept up. Willman: Thank you. I have another question. Pearson: Okay. Willman: Mr. Nunez, I um ride the Missouri bike trail multiple times daily and it's really quite uncomfortable going over those ridges that are abutted against the concrete that was, is all of the um I guess drainage infrastructure. So my question to you, is there a chance that there could be a project to smooth out those bumps? I mean they're really an aggravation. Nunez: I think even Andy could help. I've been at the City for a little over a year now. I know that our maintenance crew handles a number of things and I think a couple months back they were even addressed and Mr. Murphy helped with the scheduling of the sweeping of the streets. But in terms of the actual reforming of the asphalt around the drainage structures, I don't believe that question's come up since I've been coming. But maybe Andy can help me field this one, but that's with our, oh go ahead Andy. Hume: Mr. Chair, Lisa. Are, are there specific stretches where that's a problem, on Missouri between various streets or ... Willman: It, it's on Triviz between Missouri and Picacho. Or no, actually I would say it goes all the way north up to the turnoff to get to the outflow channel. So it's between Missouri and the outflow channel. Billings: And if I could add, Espina also has that problem horribly, and that's a really popular bike route and it's just like it's really bumpy in the same way. Hume: Okay. Billings: So it's the same problem. Hume: And, and just so I'm clear, did you mean Missouri or Triviz? Willman: The trail is along Triviz. I'm describing the multiuse path ... 24 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Hume: Triviz, okay. Willman- Between Missouri ... Hume: Got you. Willman: And the outflow channel. Hume: Okay. I just wanted to make sure I was in the right spot. Curry: It's, it's where the concrete meets the asphalt. Hume: Sure. And, and so the, basically what's happened is the concrete has sort of lifted up. Pearson: The asphalt, not ... Curry: The asphalt. Willman: The asphalt. Hume: Or the asphalt, yeah okay. Yeah that's, that's, that happens in 100-degree weather so that, what we can do is we can bring that to the attention, now um the multiuse path is operated by Parks so we may need to coordinate between Parks and Streets on that one. As far as Espina goes that would be Streets. What we can do is we can make a note of, of some of those things and have Streets go out there and take a look at it. We had a similar situation actually on NM-28 quite a number of years ago. The, it was the opposite case where the, the collar, the, the, the concrete collar around it was set too low and so what they did was they tapered that, the approach and the, and the, the, the approaches on both sides so there is a machine that can sort of grind down the, the asphalt if we get some, um Espina between ... Billings: I think it's between Lohman and Amador and just where the University picks up. Hume: Oh perfect, oh excellent, yes, comment form. If you can, if you want to scan and e-mail that either to the MPO or to me directly or to James, however you want to route that conduit, let us know and we can forward that information on to um, to the appropriate department. Pearson: Okay. Willman: Thank you. 25 I -' Pearson: Okay. 4 Murphy: My staff yelled at me for not uh mentioning that during the staff comments. 5 What we're going, what we're starting to do is we're going to be bringing out the comment, comment form that it be picked up at all MPO meetings. And 7 it's really designed to address specific concerns like this. If you have a you 8 know, a specific item of concern on a facility um you can fill out the details of that and that'll give us a, you know time to um follow up with the correct 1 ty agency whether it's City Parks, City Streets, County Engineering, whoever. 1 1 That, that way we can get, get the responsible agency to give, give a very I2 direct answer I guess, you know even you know DOT if Harold wasn't here, 13 you know we could've had that down on that comment sheet. So we want 14 to do is be able to provide you that outlet that you can, that you can get a, 15 get a response. We'll have a record of it and then uh we'll be able to forward 16 that off to the proper agency. 17 18 Pearson: Do you have a specific e-mail address that you want to use? 19 20 Murphy: You can send that at the mpo@las-cruces.org or any one of the MPO staff 21 will ... 22 23 Pearson: Okay. 24 25 Murphy: As well. 26 27 Pearson: Yeah. You might add an e-mail address when you update your form. Okay. 28 The other comment on things that are happening tomorrow night is the Ride 29 of Silence in Mesilla. So everybody's encouraged to attend that. I think it's 30 a very good event where we can honor the cyclists that have been lost or 31 injured, through no fault of their own often. And also on Saturday at 10:00 32 at City Hall is the Mayor's Bike Ride. So that's hopeful to be a fun event. 33 34 8. ADJOURNMENT (7:12) 35 36 Pearson: And I'll hear a motion to adjourn. 37 38 Curry: I'll put forth a motion to adjourn. 39 40 Shepan: (waves hands) 41 42 Pearson: Lance says he, he seconds. All in favor, "aye." 43 44 MOTION PASSES UNANIMOUSLY. 45 46 Pearson: We're adjourned. 26 1 2 3 4 Jp 5 6 6 Chairperso 7 27 28