Loading...
11-21-2002 LAS CRUCES AREA TRANSIT (RoadRUNNER) TRANSIT ADVISORY BOARD MEETING MINUTES The Transit Advisory Board (TAB) meeting was held on November 21, 2002 at Conference Room "A", City Hall, 200 N Church St., Las Cruces, New Mexico Members Present: Charles Harvey, Chairman, Mike Baumann, Jonah Garcia, Jesus Frietz, and Chris Ray Members Absent: Mike Elrod, and Catherine Peterson Others Present: M Bartholomew, Transit Administrator; Mary Ann Flenniken, Administrator Secretary and Earl Torres, Operations Supervisor CALL TO ORDER Mr Harvey called the meeting to order at 3 00 p m Roll call was taken A quorum was present for the meeting MINUTES J Garcia moved to approve the minutes of September 19, 2002 as presented Seconded by C Ray Motion carried M Bartholomew announced that City Council approved the JARC Transportation Plan, which will now be contracted out. The existing JARC Program is winding down The RFP for the vans was sent and the bid will be reviewed in January for six new vans. Earl Torres reviewed the NTD Statistics for the quarter M Bartholomew stated that we are reviewing ways to get a true ridership count. E Torres made a brief verbal report on the function of the newly formed Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Committee This committee is composed of the Fire, Police Highway and Transit Departments The Board questioned the lack of help in Dial-A-Ride A question was made as to if more training is needed on Trapeze or do we need more employees M Bartholomew announced that Shelly Modell, Senior Programs Administrator, stated that she would look into obtaining funds to help with employing a Dial-A-Ride scheduler There was discussion about the scheduling of the Fixed Route and Dial-A-Ride M Bartholomew invited the Board to tour the Transit facilities to give them the opportunity to see how scheduling is handled and to review the operations of the facilities. After much discussion regarding the JARC program and some suggestions from the Board a motion was made by J Garcia to "recommend to the City Council that the Transit Advisory a Board feels that the (JARC program) this is an important program and that it needs to be continued". Seconded by M. Baumann. Motion carried. M. Bartholomew reminded the Board that the City Council has already expressed by resolution that no City money used for this program. M. Bartholomew is reviewing the new route realignments with the new ARCView program that was recently installed on his computer. The City Council agenda is full for 2002 and the proposal for the new route realignment will not get to the Council until after the first of the year. A letter needs to be written to the Mayor regarding a reappointment for Mr. Elrod. In this letter the Board is also requesting that Mr. Ray retain his membership on the Board. Staff will work with NMSU and DABCC to recommend a person for these two positions. We will not have to worry about replacement of other Board members until 2004. The 2003 calendars were passed out showing the Advisory Board meeting for 2003. The Board is invited to attend the Open Meeting Act training. This training will be on December 18, 2002 from 9 — noon, at City Council Chambers. M. Bartholomew stated that he obtained information at the Conference in Las Vegas on buses and bus shelters. There was discussion by the Board about advertising on the transit shelters and the buses. The Southwestern Transit Association meeting will be held in Albuquerque February 2003. The agenda does not include any item specific to the Advisory Board. However, M. Bartholomew will look at the budget to see if it is possible to send a Board member. If anyone is interested in attending this meeting, please contact M. Bartholomew. There was discussion regarding transit maintenance and the budget. The Board requested that E. Torres report back to the Board at the next meeting as to the status of the fleet maintenance. There was no Old Business to discuss. ADJOURNMENT The meeting adjourned at 5:00 p.m. Prpared by: Approved by: Mary An F nniken, ecretary Charles Harvey, Chairman Date: { Transit Advisory Board- Minutes of 11-19-02 2 t } Citv of Las Cruces LAS CRUCES AREA TRANSIT ADVISORY BOARD MEETING NOTICE & AGENDA A meeting of the Transit Advisory Board will be held on Thursday, January 16, 2003 at 3:00 p.m. The meeting will be held in Conference Room A, City Hall, 200 N. Church St, Las Cruces, New Mexico. I. Call to Order and Roll Call. II. Review and Approval of Minutes of November 21, 2002. III. Unfinished Business A. Information on City Policy for bringing Board Recommendations to Council k IV. New Business A. NTD Packet Items B. 2003 Legislative Issues in Transportation C. Status of Route Realignment D. Status of proposed service to Mesilla E. Results of ride count sample by route F. Update of vehicles RFP's and JARC RFP G. Proposed meeting location for March meeting. s t V. Adjournment F p If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this meeting, please contact us 48 hours before the meeting at 541-2500/Voice I or 541-2541/TTY. f Q CD c c k CD CD CD CD � � � � � � v cow -I � m � � � � � � o CD 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 c � fy cn mm mm mm omo nmmmmmmmm � w � w w �I O N -� @a r0W -4OMwN -� Z � v a C: 9 CD O C: Q o a, v CD vi 0 N CL CD PIP h c ::r y OL W om y _ tD cr cn a � CD `< a a0 N CD CD0 0 < C. :r CL 0) CA) Ow CJt > t0 W p.- N) NNCA C V• \ \ \ o OD o � fD CD 01 CONOACA00wl< O o 0 0 0 0 0 0 CD CD O OAc omw -� O cr CD ��,f Q CD O O Q N O 7C a a (n C CU j O N C � vCD 3 Ow -1N ACrN0)w > O . � N � � � � � CL O ACA CAA -A6 0) O i a Oo 0 oOo 0 000 ) 0 — N o 0 0 0 0 o S � CO � � \ \ \ \ \ \ \ 0 O 0 zr 0 w c v N o N CD m -� O CA lD Cn N7 lD (D l< Cl) 0 CD (n a). � ^ TT 0 c COO Ch CT A O C." M -4 't CL Q' C"p N < N oC) `G D CD O m N y Ca ,�} fl1 09 CDCA CL 0� sli nai c C N c 0 CL 0 (D mZ � N . . . a) N Cn 0) NDWwwCD000CotCotoo n' CDo CD cn -j N 0, 0 A CL v C co N N O OzC 0 " Co U) Cit a � Cu �D D o 0 0 0 0 o a � V) ... _ 0 o N v � Z O N D V CO O N N c" '� � D AAAD AAA ADDA CL 0000 coo G) G) G) G) co 0000 000 w Cr �° � m .. �m- m TO m0 C/) wwWCA) CO CD CD vx v D < C: 00 w O w v, CD U) tom -0 CD WO N CD f f w °3 � a Ncn CD CD a v SQA � Q � o o � a N w a. o .� rn N CL CL CD i Ol Cn Cn Ch -4 •a Z z o O p m Z < - W —� O A CD OD Cr O> W N Cil Ch Co CD W co 00 CJS O 't\ Co CD Q O CA A -1 W Cr Cr Co O CJI O A " CD 3 -w 3 l7 N N O O O n p cni v 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o CD e. a m as CD Nj 3 a O co O OD 0' to N co O CO -I W CD -I W — O O CD 0 N OD U7 W A A A V O cn W V = C o CL a \ d 0 CD M W X000 WC71lb. i o e o 0 0 0 0 A Z � O N < ' W O CO CD OD CD N N A Co co W Co 00 !a O y Cr n N CD V O U7 -Aa ;l Cr w O O O -� a N —{ + O i A X000 W C" Z, i O O O O O O O O CD ((^^ w VJ`_ 3 OD OD CD � N O 0 O cn O cn e o Dzie 59248✓ I Prepared By i SII 2 3 4 5 — '� � IIS r II II I ! .s I SII i II i � � it II II All II � TEENE ! � I as I� 2 III ! ! II III !�- IIIIIIII Il I i � II IIII '«� II � bkM IN� 4 III �I�II� i llliill II . 11111 I 1111111 II ' � VIIII ► I II 5�II>r r•.r Y'V~mss" 1�yg _ �; h, 7 taF f }E t3 a� �- )) Y'"s k 6 �wm jJ Iau:c.+rc. !Fsaw _ !! � _ .YJ 444"`s_Fza.:a tI sr#�'3 Iw� y Jtir;: �r• rx4� h h . 'I I. 9 %�3 OPIUM r , ,rf j�r��.3kid Lt 9 {h ,—1 .._ :,.. i. .: , -, rk_:�. , " 10 i II ota II I I I �f shl y II� i t cl I I I I II I I I �tl�lol II V I I I II I I !�o 11 � I {{rr I t I ISI II I I IIII !! 1( „ .'fit t � ��,.>:~{ !-1•�:. '�-[ - '` rvk r } > t z u z 121 1-is }II i �ibf^ II AllL 11` 1111[ 1 IfI II (IIIhI II Iillill II iill �I> II IIII II1� 13NO = ..: 11:_- II ` •, !i s f_ ,_ �'k. k....�r�wl r ! .. 1414 1 .� 15 161tg Is II II Ilhhl�I II 1111111 I VIII II III III II IIIIIi'I I! III ! I ! I 11116 ,$ 17 19 !! IIIIigll. !! ! ! ill ! ! !! I ! ! i I II III ! II 11 11113 11 111111 III18 2011 I II1 x€l ��.,r _t : fix ! !rat �Li (Z !..� r +^ 6� ! 111 II ! I !1181Iz, it ! II ! I ! ! ! 1111 ! 11 III VIII19 fiIt` 120[1 I21 22 21 2 23rC�`� ,x{.� z -� ��- ¢ ��- 11, {F I I I I I 1I I II IIII ItI.�Iu I !! III III 11 111 I�' !! 11111 I 1 T te-ek 24 ..,.,. t 1.,, '1123 lot it ! ► I�I�� r ! !.!_ I 111 24 Ilea < 25 [4( fir# F 3, ^ Y 26 {rS .fF T P 3 �y I za� 25 a 27 2s,! IiI I! !! ! ! ! 1 3 � �t"I' 1 4 '> �+ 28V�II V I I I I I I 11 H i l l II 1 1 1 1 1 1 II I I�I I I I IIh I i-=l 27 a pt 7} 29n tea x' i�i� � 1 �'s']]�" tJyx� ` ty(4 rho [S 3 Iw F ! !I 28 = Bill ... -,.JS� ._'_"..--=d �.k= ta.. 'terF,. ,._. zt .<; f r r 29_ m II I I 111 11 11 I I i-I-+ i 31 SON. }. r � Is �; � 3 *. 1 I ! I I! N I ! -�(�� I III ! 0 .. .I~ :1y�'._,A.i a..H-�... 3� �.I,.%�h{([ FI div t �4�. �F�� fi,-cc�ie ,3Ykx4�:.: I 113 II....�,..J.r. vrr': r ,... 3211 ! II I ! ! IIII II Illiili !! illlll III II I II ! IIII !! 111 ! IIl1331 2 11 `. :,� �. €.; I 1 .1.,..:`.II•.. 1 !."r :C J� 1.!=`._Iy` .__[ � 3r ..I., t�::,:1 33 II II II ! I I {! ! III ! !! VIII II III ! ! ! II 1111111 1I 35 hl�..^ t °.�`5, %� [I .I �� y 1ISO`"^` 1�4. t._: J r + c. `7'" f ! 1 t , { 3611 IY;II i_(t I:RI #{ I.• f:� Yf 1..1 �1 �_ # [� ! � II ! - _. 13� kd .38 37r� f l I I �� 11 I: I! HIM !!!36 I _...I...:! ! 1 I ! I (! I ! ! ! ! I !! ! I I ! ! ! 11 ! �..:v.l.'_I., 38 3° Iy I ?. E� �+ t o i r ! ! 1 ! ! lu 38 t I � =1_. ..I :fi 1 ;a�3a 40ill I I� II ; 111 ! 11 II 1111111 II 111111 II IIiIIII II I I }IIi II Iiiill I� 4o IrIr r 11rr p`c ! } t ( I it in�I I 4 I.,r Ii F L { �' h I I'� ( f ( .!,,:� I ci I 10 ANIBRIDGE 58246 Prepared By Apprpred By .2 3 it �E�u� I it II � II 5 II 6 1I II IIY` I II outt c, li II ale II II' jog [.--p II �ic?s'Yr�A 3 �� ,. ...�I a.,„ 1_ .t...: � -:::I`T,~'; � F ( f 11:.:3.: 11 �.-r` i <:f-+, 1^Srl_,' r ��� 1 2II IIIi� � 111111 l l illlI� II 1111111 II I II �1' II IIIi � I III2 3 I T > �} MON- 44 ....kN�,i. 3 ���". ti 's. t �, r x' .�,�--fir'""-.,." r� .� p�-a s y'�s �•L_ Fr 4r {J- II I I I f I I II �� I -: 1 611 1 1I I I li$I II I I I I II III < <hI li 111 111 7r€ r i7hyc _" .PaLJGy z � , ��a` a` ' r fes" :II I I ISI 1 I 16 ��''v... �.� 7 8I I 1110ta 1 11 1Itloq� 1 11 11111 III I cls I iIi I I II IiI� k� II IilIII 9 I s 10 T LU 11 1 1 Ii bb1 11 I I III 10 12IrI—r II II I I � I�I II 1 (1 1 y 1 1 1 III III I hili I11 I I11111 11 1 I I II I I I I 11 11112 131.;'I I- , il 13 14 II II II I I lililil� II 111111 II I I i l III IIII I I II III TI it 11 1111 II !4 F 16 1__I t li I I la II _I I I i l l l l l l l It II III III II I I I I �N it IIIIII ..-` 1 ':. �7 r ��r':I ,_. .. t.a��k:.- ? �._s � tl .,.� I• � ^S t. ;>�a, }-yf-:...15 .�� 18 II I I I IIIIII 1118 �:. 20 I � klq II20 221 1r�S.1cz"���ktruxf..rla .. k �f� 435 't t 22 it to�'a II I Il I �� II IIII ! III I I I l�Iz II III III it III I I II I i l I i_._ I li 22 a 23i 24 1I `s, f I7yIIII� ,4.r:ns..os.,fra:L ,z...�vM+r �II jJI 1 2 3 24 M t �Yocn25 Z'26I.qr� 25 11126 27�� It s..k-_>.—..,. ',.->fl" �r i.+l��,���...�. �s �?'� �A � G �:s;d��`y" �•� �lsl.� c:a.� F I Y; ,{., --��� -14r�,y>,�,�11 -�•F _ � �' � a� �,�. �.•� �-� . �� ���• LW,T� krGG �>;���I..� �a.rl .!'.�,r�.,_ ,� - 28 I.i..'�Y"+§ $hF IiI is t Zs,,t¢T a,.°�'�..,,ts.4, II I 1m.'i a'(I I1K I��1.I�W�, = fI I: Sa II I II I._.I •._"1,�-..i.tI I I.r I I �— �w I1I�c�°IFi...�t}"rIY�I 6T"F4YII ;I;�,;�1j{I yI G��L`Nb.I4,'{.i""`t�aS liI�7I�•,>�..3°-�I�t��3: 27 2829 £i , Id T-1 II III3029 30 31 ,.• asp`"�"§a�t �.•��„r, i � (_ ,+74 1 �+ ,} � [ sx- s�F •E�S EN _r, i 11 32 L.. I 1 I./�I �{!k.i. r '_•.+..<,�-.��.,:IFfT1- 4 !1r?�r�}` I } I _� 1 !(� e rI 31h UI IIq 32 Sp 1Z3 4 * 3334II II it ( IIIIII II ( I IIII I ( IIII II III II H III I ( it 1111111 1134 I 1 351 x.r 36 I !i II III IF Ii Iil11IIIIIII -..IIIIIIL,.Ii. !I iI ; I .L.� 35 37 ! S K k ]I 1 f 1 t t t 11 I I I II 36 1 d 1111 k.?k1'- I �.I Itl3 11 .{_. 1 7 38 II I 1► II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 111 I I II 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 III I i l II �.� I. .�� .lr1 138 401 I I _ l~ref r,I£r 1 ::ii•_ I.. �k;. r.I. _;::k at_ r I I. 1 .. ...I::: i Ililtlll1111111IIIIII � IIII1111111IIIIIIIIII11II1111140 [i �. DIAL-A-RIDE DATA November 2002 December 2002 ADA Trips- 843 ADA Trips- 826 Senior Trips 3049 Senior Trips 2879 WTW Trips 157 WTW Trips 152 Senior Denials- 6 Senior Denials- 3 ADA Denials - 0 ADA Denials - 0 City of Las Cruces CMP 96.2 Effective Date:l1/21/94 I Resolution 95-151 Revised: �� ` W" QUFW&F0R,C1TY CC 1 AEON I. APPLICABILITY This policy applies to all City Council Appointed advisory board and commissions. II. POLICY: It is the policy of the City Council that they be advised of all formal requests for City Council action by members of advisory boards/commissions. III. PROCEDURE: I. All requests for City Council action must be endorsed by a majority of the members of the board/commission. Upon receipt of the appropriate minutes, the request(s) will be excerpted from the advisory board/committee minutes. Such requests will be forwarded to the City Manager by letter from the Chair, with a copy of the minutes. The City Manager will forward such requests to the City Council for consideration. 2. This policy will apply only to recommendations from boards/commissions to which residents) are appointed by the City Council. It is not intended to prohibit any individual who serves on a board/commission from having input into any other areas of discussion where any resident may have input. James A. Ericson, City Manager Date Contact:Maggie Hart Mid Region Council of Governments 505-247-1750/mhartnmrgcog.org Regional Transit District Act • Would allow local governments to cooperate on regional transit projects • Would allow two or more municipalities, counties,pueblos, tribes, or other local governments to form a Regional Transit District • Requests an appropriation of state matching funds to aid local governments with the costs of establishing an RTD and the costs of developing a transit service plan. In Practice: o Each local governing body would decide,by resolution, to participate in a RTD. o Local governments would sign an intergovernmental agreement to establish an RTD, set boundaries, determine Board representation and voting strength, and establish by-laws and administrative structure. o Legislation would not prescribe administrative details,but would give local governments flexibility to decide what structure best meets the needs of the region. o RTD governing boards would be composed of local elected officials or their designees,who are appointed by their respective jurisdictions. o RTD would develop transit service plan (TSP) and budget for region. TSP would detail level of service provided to each community and costs. o The New Mexico Department of Transportation would serve as the repository of the matching fund, and would provide administrative review of RTDs. The NMDOT Secretary would certify that all criteria have been met for creation of an RTD and the Transportation Commission would review transit service plans. o Additional tax authority, dedicated to RTDs,would be given to participating jurisdictions, not to the RTD itself. o Dedicated tax authority will provide the long-term revenue required for transit operations. o Each local government that joins an RTD must submit to its voters any request for imposition of a transit-dedicated tax o Only those communities that approve the transit tax will have voting members on the RTD Board of Directors. o Legislation would allow communities to opt-in after initial RTD establishment, and would allow participating communities to opt-out after bonds have been retired. 2003 STPP PROJECTED TIMELINE FOR TEA-21 REAUTHORIZATION TIMEFRAME ACTION January • New Mexico Legislative Session begins • 108th Congress convenes, Administration to submit TEA-21 renewal plan to Congress • STPP TEA-21 Renewal Blueprint release • STPP Bridge Maintenance Decoder release February • House T &I expected to introduce TEA-21 renewal package (Senate has not set schedule but wants final bill by Sept. 30) • STPP CMAQ Decoder release • Week of Feb. 17th-Recess and District Work Period March • New Mexico Legislative Session ends • House Subcommittee action on renewal bill expected • STPP Sprawl &Health report release • March 5-7 League of American Bicyclists Bike Summit in Washington, D.C. • March 7-11 National League of Cities Summit in Washington, D.C. • March 9-12 APTA Legislative Conference in Washington, D.C. • March TBD STPP Grassroots Summit in Washington, D.C. April Congress passes budget resolution for FY'03 May Full House T&I Committee expected to pass bill June • House and Senate floor action July • Committee leaders hope to begin conference committee by summer and reach agreement by Sept. 30 expiration date August • District Work Period September • Se t. 30 - TEA-21 Expires (Note: District Work Periods are the ideal times to plan visits and events with Members of Congress) For More Information Contact:Maggie Hart Mid Region Council of Governments 505-247-1750/mhart@..mrgcog.org Regional Transit District Act • Would allow local governments to cooperate on regional transit projects • Would allow two or more municipalities, counties,pueblos, tribes, or other local governments to form a Regional Transit District • Requests an appropriation of state matching funds to aid local governments with the costs of establishing an RTD and the costs of developing a transit service plan. In Practice: o Each local governing body would decide,by resolution, to participate in a RTD. o Local governments would sign an intergovernmental agreement to establish an RTD, set boundaries, determine Board representation and voting strength, and establish by-laws and administrative structure. o Legislation would not prescribe administrative details,but would give local governments flexibility to decide what structure best meets the needs of the region. o RTD governing boards would be composed of local elected officials or their designees,who are appointed by their respective jurisdictions. o RTD would develop transit service plan (TSP) and budget for region. TSP would detail level of service provided to each community and costs. o The New Mexico Department of Transportation would serve as the repository of the matching fund, and would provide administrative review of RTDs. The NMDOT Secretary would certify that all criteria have been met for creation of an RTD and the Transportation Commission would review transit service plans. o Additional tax authority, dedicated to RTDs,would be given to participating jurisdictions,not to the RTD itself. o Dedicated tax authority will provide the long-term revenue required for transit operations. o Each local government that joins an RTD must submit to its voters any request for imposition of a transit-dedicated tax o Only those communities that approve the transit tax will have voting members on the RTD Board of Directors. o Legislation would allow communities to opt-in after initial RTD establishment, and would allow participating communities to opt-out after bonds have been retired. NEXT STEPS (a 2003 STPP PROJECTED TIMELINE FOR TEA-21 REAUTHORIZATION TIMEFRAME ACTION January • New Mexico Legislative Session begins • 108th Congress convenes, Administration to submit TEA-21 renewal plan to Congress • STPP TEA-21 Renewal Blueprint release • STPP Bridge Maintenance Decoder release February • House T &I expected to introduce TEA-21 renewal package(Senate has not set schedule but wants final bill by Sept. 30) • STPP CMAQ Decoder release • Week of Feb. 17th- Recess and District Work Period March • New Mexico Legislative Session ends • House Subcommittee action on renewal bill expected • STPP Sprawl &Health report release • March 5-7 League of American Bicyclists Bike Summit in Washington, D.C. • March 7-11 National League of Cities Summit in Washington, D.C. • March 9-12 APTA Legislative Conference in Washington, D.C. • March TBD STPP Grassroots Summit in Washington, D.C. April • Congress passes budget resolution for FY'03 May • Full House T&I Committee expected to pass bill June • House and Senate floor action July • Committee leaders hope to begin conference committee by summer and reach agreement by Sept. 30 expiration date August • District Work Period September • Sept. 30 - TEA-21 Expires (Note:District Work Periods are the ideal times to plan visits and events with Members of Congress) 1 CITY OF SANTA FE,NEW MEXICO 2 RESOLUTION NO. 2002 - 3 INTRODUCED BY: 4 COUNCILOR MIGUEL CHAVEZ 5 6 7 8 A RESOLUTION OF SUPPORT FOR THE REGIONAL TRANSIT DISTRICT ACT THAT 9 ESTABLISHES A METHOD FOR COUNTIES, MUNICIPALITIES AND TRIBAL 10 GOVERNMENTS TO ESTABLISH REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION DISTRICTS AND 11 PROVIDES AN APPROPRIATION FOR START-UP COSTS FOR SAID DISTRICTS. 12 WHEREAS, the City of Santa Fe is committed to encouraging alternative modes of 13 transportation; and 14 WHEREAS, public transportation is key to the quality of life and economic opportunities for 15 New Mexicans; and 16 WHEREAS, multi jurisdictional public transit systems work to reduce the congestion of single- 17 occupant motor vehicle traffic by providing transportation options for residents; and 18 WHEREAS, reducing traffic congestion works to decrease automobile accidents on freeways 19 and streets; and 20 WHEREAS,regional public transit would reduce noise and air pollution; and 21 WHEREAS, regional public transit would extend the life of New Mexico's existing roadways 22 by easing the traffic burden; and 23 WHEREAS, there is an increasing need to coordinate public transit services and systems of 24 different jurisdictions and levels of government; and 1 I WHEREAS,local units of government lack a mechanism to create and fund regional networks of 2 safe and efficient pubic transit services; and 3 WHEREAS,legislation at the state level is needed to enable the establishment of regional transit 4 districts capable of providing regional transit services; 5 6 7 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY OF SANTA FE that the City of 8 Santa Fe supports passage of by the State of New Mexico's 46"' Legislature during 9 the Second Session,2003. 10 PASSED,APPROVED and ADOPTED this day of ,2002. 11 12 CITY OF SANTA FE: 13 14 15 LARRY A.DELGADO,MAYOR 16 ATTEST: 17 18 19 YOLANDA Y.VIGIL,CITY CLERK 20 21 22 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 23 24 25 ,CITY ATTORNEY 2 New Mexico 2003 Safe Routes to Schools Legislation Creating Safe Places for New Mexico's Children to Walk and Bike to School New Mexico has one of the highest child pedestrian fatality rates in the United States. Here in New Mexico,pedestrian injury remains the second leading cause of unintentional injury-related death among children ages 5-14.1 It is time for New Mexico to invest in pedestrian and bicycle safety for our children! Why Do We Need Safe Routes to Schools Legislation? New Mexico is below average on yet another national list: pedestrian and bicycle fatalities in traffic accidents. Many New Mexico communities, especially those surrounding our schools, lack sidewalks,bike paths, street crossings, and other elements necessary for safe walking environments. • New Mexico, with 120 pedestrian fatalities in 2000 and 2001, has the nation's highest pedestrian fatality rate. Nearly 14 percent of all traffic deaths were pedestrians, more than the national average of 12 percent, and just a slight decrease from the state's pedestrian fatalities in 1998 and 1999.2 Many more are injured. • New Mexico ranked 6th highest in the United States in terms of bicyclist fatalities in 1999, much higher than the national average. In 1999, bicyclist fatalities represented 2.2 percent of all traffic fatalities in New Mexico.3 • In Albuquerque, 22.4 percent of all traffic deaths were pedestrians, also much higher than the national average. A total of 48 pedestrians died in Albuquerque in 2000 and 2001. Las Cruces, at 20.2 percent, also had a higher rate of pedestrian traffic deaths than the national average. Santa Fe's rate was 12 percent.4 Children that walk and ride bicycles are at risk from unsafe streets 1. Children who walk and ride bicycles are among the groups that are at more risk from unsafe streets. "Pedestrian injury remains the second leading cause of unintentional injury-related death among children ages 5-14."5 Parents are concerned that traffic creates an unsafe environment, so children walk and bicycle less. 2. Almost 11 percent of all pedestrian deaths nationally are children. New Mexico's fatality rate for children is above the national average. The national rate of child pedestrian deaths has declined in the 1990s, but analysts believe it is in large part because children walk less.6 3. Native American children are at great risk; 25 percent of the state's child pedestrian fatalities are Native American.' 4. Many of New Mexico communities lack sidewalks, bike paths, street crossings, or other elements that are necessary to provide safe routes to schools.$ New Mexico's cities often move vehicular traffic on wide arterial streets with legal traffic speeds of 35 to 40 miles per hour. The pedestrian and bicycle fatality rate increases with vehicle speeds: pedestrians hit by a car traveling at 44 miles per hour have a 17 percent chance of survival. At 31 mph, the survival rate is almost four times greater, at 63 percent.9 tiINV-NM 14i14t I/ 5. Of 724 bicycle collisions over a three-year period in the City of Albuquerque, adolescents and young adults had disproportionate numbers of collisions: 7 to 15 year olds had 164 collisions (23 percent). A primary reason for not riding a bike was that people feel the streets and drivers are too dangerous.10 Children are less active, risking their health and well-being. 1. The Surgeon General observed that 78 percent of children are not active enough, measured as a minimum of 30-60 minutes of activity plus 20 minutes of vigorous exercise a day." New Mexico's Department of Health recently reported, "As a state, we need to find ways to reverse the trend toward increasing rates of obesity... we need to promote healthy diets and regular exercise."12 2. Children in all age groups are gaining weight. One in five children is overweight or at risk of becoming overweight. One in three teenagers are overweight or at risk. These rates reflect a 50-100 percent increase in 10 years.13 Obesity prevalence more than doubled over 25 years among adolescent males and females.14 35 percent of children watch five hours or more of television a day.15 Sedentary behavior, along with eating habits, and socioeconomic status are causal factors of obesity in children and adolescents.' 3. Children who breath polluted, smoggy air are much more likely to develop asthma. Asthma is now the leading serous chronic disease among children. The more we drive our vehicles to schools and other destinations, the more vehicle miles driven, leading to more smog.' Children are losing their independence. 1. Fewer children walk and bike to school. Parents fear for their children's safety due to dangers from high-speed traffic and crime. By 1995,research found that only 10 percent of all trips to and from school are on foot, a decrease of 40 percent since 1969.18 More traffic is induced as parents drive their children to school. The more unsafe our streets become, the less likely children are allowed to walk or ride bicycled. "We have overlooked and undervalued waking for too long, and as a result waking ahs become more dangerous," says National Safety Council president Jerry Scannell. Yet, "walking to school together is a great way to teach and role-model safe pedestrian behavior.9519 2. Children cannot acquire traffic skills critical to their own safe mobility if they don't experience their neighborhood and school area on foot. They remain unfamiliar with their neighborhood and isolated from people and the environment.20 3. When restricted by bus or parents' schedules, children who cannot walk or bike miss out on after school programs.21 4. As schools are located on the edge of communities, the distance is too far for children to walk, and the provision of safe sidewalks and other safety features is uncommon. STPP-NM 12/12/02 2 r Accidents create huge costs to the community but little attention is Raid. 1. "In 2001, 463 New Mexican pedestrians were struck by motor vehicles, resulting in 77 fatalities and 386 injuries.22 The overall cost to the community for these fatal and non-fatal crashes was estimated at$65,300,000.23 2. In New Mexico,with the highest pedestrian fatality rate in the nation, the state's spending on pedestrian projects amounts to only 0.9 percent of our federal transportation dollars.24 What does a Safe Routes to Schools program do? Safe Routes to Schools revives walking and biking to schools as safe and valued activities for children! It creates partnerships between schools, families, local officials and Public Works staff, police, and state highway officials. In small and large communities, Safe Routes programs can install engineering solutions— physical improvements in the public right-of-way—that reduce speeds, narrow crossing distances, and improve children's' visibility and safety. A variety of approaches are used; the `four E's' used by Safe Routes partners are engineering, enforcement, encouragement and education.25 But engineering solutions are key; they reduce physical hazards and remove barriers. Participants in focus groups around the state who were involved in local pedestrian safety efforts identified funding as the major barrier to safety efforts.26 What are the benefits of bicycle and pedestrian safety projects such as Safe Routes to Schools? Slower speed zones lead to reductions in pedestrian and bicycle casualties.27 Walking and biking lead to healthy, alert children. They positively affect academic performance and skill development. Studies have shown that a child's mood is improved for up to two hours following exercise.28 Safety projects are cost effective: bicycle and pedestrian safety projects have been rated by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) as six times more cost effective than more traditional highway safety improvement projects.29 Parents, friends and entire communities get involved in traffic safety programs, fostering a sense of responsibility. Children and their parents can conduct"walkability audits"that measure how easily and safely a walk to school is. Many parents are vehicle drivers too; they become part of the solution, changing their driving habits in neighborhoods. Federal funds are directed to local communities for their Safe Routes to Schools programs. CTnn NIKA 17/17/(17 S Mark Fenton of the Partnership for a Walkable America summarizes why all New Mexicans should support Safe Routes to Schools: "Walking is still the fundamental mode of transportation, no matter where we go—in a car, on a bus, or a plane,we always end up walking."30 Children and adults will benefit from improvements in the vicinity of schools, and will be encouraged to walk or ride bicycles. How can state government sumort Safe Routes to Schools? The Safe Routes to Schools legislation directs New Mexico's Highway and Transportation Department to use transportation funds to make it easier for children to bike and walk to school. States receive Transportation Safety Set-aside funds from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), and they have a great deal of discretion on how to spend those funds. These funds can be utilized for a Safe Routes to Schools program. The funding of engineering changes—sidewalks, crosswalks, traffic signals—is the most costly of the programmatic activities in a Safe Routes program, and Safety funds can be designated for these improvements. State Departments of Transportation that administer the funds have opposed using Safety Set- aside funds in Safe Routes programs, due to the re-allocation of funds that would result.3' However, the New Mexico Traffic Safety Bureau of NMSHTD should support Safe Routes legislation with such funding; they have identified reducing fatalities and injuries resulting from pedestrian crashes as a priority.32 States' Safe Routes to School programs do not raise taxes. As illustrated in California and Washington (see below), they can utilize funds received each year from the federal government. Do other States Have Safe Routes to Schools Programs? Yes! Safe Routes programs in California and Washington utilize federal safety money for engineering projects. 1. "A wide range of traffic calming and traditional pedestrian safety approaches are eligible for funding" in California." Requests for funds from local communities far exceeds the amount of funding available; in California's first year of the program, $130 million was requested for the $20 million available.33 2. The state of Washington passed a bill allocating $5 million for"Traffic Safety Near Schools." Capital improvement projects are eligible for state grants. In the first year (2000), applications for$12 million were received.34 Four states have passed legislation approving a dedication of funds to Safe Routes to School programs; eight states along with New Mexico, have legislation planned or before their legislature.35 STPP-NM 12/12/02 4 1 Center for Injury Prevention Research and Education, UNM Department of Emergency Medicine,"Executive Summary, New Mexico Pedestrian Safety Plan,"1996 2 STPP,"Mean Streets,"2002 3 Center for Injury Prevention Research and Education, UNM Department of Emergency Medicine,"Executive Summary, New Mexico Pedestrian Safety Plan,"1996 4 STPP, Mean Streets, 2002 s STPP,citing National Safe Kids Campaign, Report to the Nation on Child Pedestrian Safety, 2002 6 STPP, Mean Streets, 2002 ' Center for Injury Prevention.Research and Education, UNM Department of Emergency Medicine,"Executive Summary, New Mexico Pedestrian Safety Plan,"1996 8 New Mexico SAFE KIDS press release,October, 2002 9 California Safe Routes to Schools Initiative,"Safe Routes to Schools,"2001 10 City of Albuquerque, Comprehensive On-Street Bicycle Plan, 2000 11 California Safe Routes to Schools Initiative,citing Surgeon General's report, 1996 12 New Mexico Department of Health,"The State of Health in New Mexico 2000 Report" 13 California Safe Routes to Schools Initiative, citing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 14 American Association of Obesity,citing CDC, National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Ogden et. al. JAMA 2002;288:1728-1732. 1s California Safe Routes to Schools Initiative,citing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 16 American Association of Obesity, http://www.obesity.org/subs/childhood/prevalence.shtml 18 Andrea Broaddus, STPP, November, 2002, citing University of Southern California decade-long study STPP, Mean Streets citing Federal Highway Administration,"Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey,"1995 19 Center for Injury Prevention Research and Education, UNM Department of Emergency Medicine and New Mexico SAFE KIDS, press release, October, 2002 20 California Safe Routes to Schools Initiative,"Safe Routes to Schools,"2001 u Ibid. 22 New Mexico Traffic Crash Information, 2001. UNM, Division of Government Research. NM Traffic Safety Bureau—Transportation Programs Division, 2001 23 Center for Injury Prevention Research and Education, UNM Department of Emergency Medicine,"A Comprehensive Pedestrian Safety Program for New Mexico" 24 STPP, Mean Streets, 2002 2s Transportation Alternatives,"The 2002 Summary of Safe Routes to School Programs in the United Sates," 2002 26 Center for Injury Prevention Research and Education, UNM Department of Emergency Medicine, "Executive Summary, New Mexico Pedestrian Safety Plan,"1996 27 California Safe Routes to Schools Initiative,"Safe Routes to Schools,"2001 28 Ibid.,citing Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada 29 STPP-California,AB1475 Fact Sheet 30 M 1999 ark Fenton, Partnership for a Walkable America,at the Safe Routes to School Conference, Sacramento,CA, 1 31 Transfer,"Safe Routes To School: Congressional Hearing Held," STPP, Feb. 19, 2002 32 Center for Injury Prevention Research and Education, UNM Department of Emergency Medicine,"A Comprehensive Pedestrian Safety Program for New Mexico" 33 Transportation Alternatives,The 2002 Summary of Safe Routes to SchOol Programs in the United Sates, 2002 34 Ibid. 3s Ibid. CTnn KIRA JI -IYI 1 • 1/ " c � Working for People: Public Transit Legislation Supporting Balanced Transportation Choices in New Mexico Transit works for people. It builds a healthy economy, connects people to jobs,reduces household spending on transportation, and allows more people the freedom to travel. Transit is an increasingly necessary component of livable communities and of economically healthy regions. It fosters strong neighborhoods, and is a public service that can be a lifesaver in emergencies. Transit creates healthier communities. Transit reduces negative impacts on our environment, and that is economic development! It reduces traffic congestion, air pollution, and the amount of energy required for private automobiles. Reductions in air pollution allow people at risk from harmful pollutants to live healthier lives. Transit encourages economic growth, real estate development and public investments. 1. For every dollar we invest in running public transportation systems in the US,business sales are boosted by three dollars.A$10 million dollar investment to build the system can boost sales annually to $30 million, and create more than 300 jobs. Another$10 million dollar investment to run the systems creates nearly 600 jobs.' 2. Purchase of a ten-dollar bus pass boosts the local economy by$35,while a ten-dollar fill up of gasoline leaks $8.50 out of the local economy.Z 3. With increases in ridership on transit systems around the country, including Albuquerque's, transit agencies are encouraging and partnering in the development of active,walkable neighborhoods around stations and where transit routes connect.3 This attracts commercial investment and adds to the values of properties. 4. Transit systems reduce traffic,thus extending the life of existing roads and stretching local and state road maintenance dollars. Transit moves people to their jobs and other destinations. 1. New Mexicans receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)must enroll in work and work-training programs. Only 20%of those families have regular access to an automobile.4 2. In northern New Mexico's "Enchanted Circle,' TANF recipients may own cars—as many as 67%in Taos,but only 48% in Mora.' However,the proportion of owners with reliable cars which can be repaired and insured may be considerably less. Some transit routes exist for welfare-to-work recipients in the area,but ten different routes are recommended to adequately serve workers and employers.6 3. A survey conducted in the 1900s revealed that people in Rio Arriba and Santa Fe Counties consider transportation to be the greatest obstacle to working in Los Alamos.7 The Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce recognizes that transit is a business development issue; it is not simply a social service issue. Los Alamos businesses' greatest problem is staffing,the key reason cited as the lack of alternative transportation from other communities.8 STPP-NM 12/12/02 1 Transit saves on the transportation portion of the household budget. Effective public transit systems reduce private transportation spending.Money saved can be spent elsewhere in the household budget. 1. New Mexican households spend an average $8,211 per year, 19.2 percent of total spending,on private transportation. That's worth$5.57 billion each year.9 Money spent on the purchase of vehicles, insurance,gasoline and related goods mostly leaves the state. 2. A typical family in the US can save an average of$3,000 annually on auto expenses if they live in an area with many public transportation options. 3. A motor vehicle costs$4,800 to$10,000 a year to own and maintain in the United States; taking public transit costs$200 to$2,000. 4. Rural residents without access to a reliable car pay dearly to get to work. In Sierra County, some farm workers pay up to 50 percent of their$42 daily wages for transportation to the fields of Hatch. They pay the equivalent of a 50 percent tax because they desperately need their jobs.10 Transit allows people to live independent lives. `Transit dependent' groups in New Mexico include the youth,the elderly,people with disabilities, low-income families, and the unemployed.The number of people in these groups will increase at a rate higher than the overall population growth in New Mexico. 1. More than 564,000 New Mexicans—or 31%-are under 19 years of age.More than 94,000 people—or 5.2%—are over 75 years old." 2. More than 200,000 of the adult population(ages 21 to 64) in New Mexico-21%—have a disability.12 3. 92,000 New Mexicans who are over age 64 have a disability—nearly 45%0.13 4. 45,686 households (6.7%)in New Mexico do not have a car—equal to 120, 154 people.14 5. By 2025, the number of people in New Mexico over 65 is projected to grow by 46%to 441,000.15 6. Access to medical services is an issue for low-income residents and welfare recipients in rural New Mexico.16 Nationally,riders travel a billion miles every year on the 1,100 rural transit systems. For the 30 million rural people who are elderly, or earn wages below the poverty line, or live with disabilities,public transportation services are their connection to jobs,health care, and friends." Transit alleviates traffic congestion and reduces travel times. Public transportation helps lessen traffic on highways and local roads,reducing commuter times. Transit is a key component of efficient transportation systems. As stated in a study of regional transit in the middle Rio Grande region, "It is not possible to build enough roadways to solve all the area's current or future congestion problems."18 1. The 12-mile section of U.S. Highway 84/285 between Santa Fe and Pojoaque carnes 40,000 vehicles per day. This includes 2,500 Los Alamos Laboratory employees.19 The Santa Fe Trails transit system initiated a pilot regional transit service in 1997 to serve communities north of Santa Fe. It supplied rides to an average of 1,200 passengers per day in its first week, increasing to a high of 1,500 in the second week, and removed a daily minimum of 750 cars from the highway and local "choke-points.i20 STPP-NM 12/12/02 2 Transit reduces air pollution that can lead to smog and health problems. People who take transit instead of driving vehicles help to reduce air pollution. Without more transit systems and intermodal forms of transportation, air pollution will only get worse. 1. The Albuquerque region is expected to experience increased air pollution by 2015 with increases in automobile use, despite recent projects and plans to increase roadway capacity. Commuting delays are forecast to increase from six minutes to 20 minutes of every hour spent commuting by 2025.21 The current trend"will limit the region's ability to attain air quality conformity and Albuquerque's air quality will once again deteriorate."zz 2. Public transportation prevents emissions of more than 126 million pounds of smog-causing hydrocarbons and 156 million pounds of disease-causing nitrogen oxides.23 It also greatly reduces emissions of nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide,hydrocarbons,benzene,methane, aldehydes and VOC's. 3. Ozone-related health problems put one out of every three people in the US at risk. Children, adults with respiratory or cardiovascular disease and the aging population are those most vulnerable.24 Transit systems save energy and reduce our dependence on oil, much of it imported from the highly unstable Middle East. Public transportation is essential in reducing oil consumption. More energy is used for transportation in the US than any other activity:25 1. Nationally, public transit systems have reduced gasoline consumption by 1.5 billion gallons a year.26 "For every passenger mile traveled,public transportation is twice as fuel efficient as private automobiles."27 Transit fosters strong neighborhoods. Public transit makes it possible for more people to participate in and contribute to the community, its services and activities. People who take the bus are likely to walk during part of their trip,which helps create pedestrian friendly areas. A multi-modal system of transit, sidewalks, and the right mix of vehicle and bicycle ways can add up to a better quality of life in the community. Transit can provide transportation services during times of natural disasters and other crises. Public transportation systems have assisted commuters,residents,volunteers and emergency personnel during natural and man-made disasters in New York City,Washington,DC, Chicago,and communities in North Carolina,Florida,Tennessee and California. Resiliency and redundancies within a transportation system is most valued when emergencies occur.28 A community is only as livable as the diversity of its modal choices. In other words,the health of our citizens is literally reflective of the choices we offer, or don't offer, in getting around. Where are the transit systems in the state? Individual cities, towns,tribal nations and private companies operate public transit systems throughout New Mexico. Programs are differentiated depending on the target population and size of the community. All receive federal funding. STPP-NM 12/12/02 3 • Three, soon to be four,programs are based in cities with populations greater than 50,000. • Twenty programs move people in rural communities (less than 50,000). • Fifty-two programs serve elderly and disabled individuals. Twenty-five programs help people in the state's Welfare to Work program get to work and home. How are New Mexico's transit systems paid for? Federal Transit Administration (FTA)dollars pay for the bulk of transit systems in New Mexico, with a match of local dollars. The Public Transportation Programs Bureau(PTPB) of NMSHTD administers FTA funds for public transportation. New Mexico is one of four states in the country that does not expend dedicated State dollars for transit projects. New Mexico's Public Mass Transit Act prohibits the state from spending more than$50,000 in federal matching funds on rural transit systems.A 1975 law set this maximum expenditure. In 1997 and in 2001, the New Mexico State legislature passed bills that would have eliminated and raised the funding `cap.' However, at the urging of top Highway and Transportation Department Officials, Governor Johnson vetoed the legislation. STPP will help promote legislation in the 2003 Legislative Session to eliminate this funding cap. Why should we have Regional Transit Districts? As New Mexico grows, our economies become more regional than local. Many people travel from their homes in one community to their workplaces and medical appointments in another. Yet,most existing transit systems do not cross jurisdictional boundaries. Regional Transit Districts(RTDs) would solve that problem by allowing public transit systems to serve multiple communities. Existing New Mexico law does not support long-term cooperation between local governments on public transit projects, and currently does not permit Regional Transit Districts. RTD legislation introduced in 1997 died on the Senate floor in a session-ending filibuster by Senator Bill Davis, and similar 1998 legislation died in committee. The proposed legislation before the 2003 session will enable the creation of RTDs across New Mexico. Local governments could decide whether to participate in an RTD. Each local government would submit to its voters any request for a transit tax. What would be the benefits of Regional Transit Districts? With broader coverage in routes and schedules, regional transit would provide more New Mexicans and visitors with transportation solutions. 1. The majority of 63%of Albuquerque residents support the creation of a"regional transit authority"when it was considered in 1997. The majority of supporters would also favor an 29 increase in gross receipts tax to fund an authority. 2. Governor-Elect Bill Richardson has stated that he supports regional transit and will support enabling legislation for Regional Transit Districts.His plan to promote balanced transportation system states, "Through these regional authorities, we will provide improved mobility, economic opportunity and environmental quality."30 STPP-NM 12/12/02 q • I rI RTDs mean more money for New Mexico FTA funds are derived from congressionally mandated fuel taxes paid at the gas pump.Yet, during the 1990s, a larger share of the funds deposited into the Federal Transit Account was returned to states with large urban populations. New Mexico is a donor state, depositing more transit dollars into the federal treasury than are returned.31 Regional transit districts would bring those dollars back to New Mexico. Other advantages of RTDs are efficiencies in managing and operating transit programs, a greater ability to coordinate funds from various sources, and less competition for funding." Where has Regional Transit been considered? Due to the concentration of jobs in towns and cities and the historic or recent location of residences in rural and semi-rural areas,the need for transportation options between workplaces and homes has become apparent. Studies on the need for regional transit systems or more transit routes that cross local jurisdictions have been conducted in the Albuquerque region,Dona Ana County,the "Enchanted Circle"(portions of Taos, Colfax and Mora counties), and in the Santa Fe/Espanola/Las Alamos area. 1. A study of the Albuquerque region reveals a strong regional commuter market is not served by existing transit. Origin-destination patterns that would support a regional system are indicated. For example, 30 percent of all workers in the region are employed in six activity centers in the Clty.33 2. The Regional Transportation Taskforce was formed in Los Alamos, Rio Arriba and Santa Fe Counties in 2002 to establish comprehensive regional transportation in North Central New Mexico. Convened and facilitated by the Northern Pueblos Regional Planning Organization and the Regional Development Corporation,the group also receives support from the New Mexico Municipal League.34 1 American Public Transportation Association,"Local Coalition Workbook,"2001 Z Michael Replogle,Transportation Director, Environmental Defense Fund 3 Progress,"The Transit Renaissance,"Dave Burwell and Hank Dittmar,October 2002 4 ATR Institute, University of New Mexico,"Moving Forward: A Transportation Toolkit for Welfare Reform,"2000 5 Ibid. 6 ATR Institute, University of New Mexico,"Enchanted Circle Transit Study,"2001 7 Los Alamos County/Tri-Area Association for Economic Development,"Los Alamos County Labor Survey,"1994 8 J] Maier,Testimony before the NM Highway Commission,August, 2002 9 U.S. Department of Labor,"Consumer Spending Survey,"2000; U.S. Department of Commerce,"2000 Census of Population" 10 ATR Institute, University of New Mexico,"Public Transportation: A Priority Link in Moving People to Work," 1998 11 U.S.Census Bureau, BBER files DP-1, DP4 " Ibid. 13 US Census Bureau, BBER files DP-1, DP-2 14 U.S.Census Bureau, BBER files DP-1, DP4 1s 2025 projection, 2000 Census of Population 16 ATR Institute, University of New Mexico,"Public Transportation: A Priority Link in Moving People to Work," 1998 17 American Public Transportation Association,"The Benefits of Public Transportation,"2002 18 MRGCOG, Regional Transit Authority Service Plan, 1998 19 Bill Richardson for Governor campaign speech, 2002 STPP-NM 12/12/02 5 20 ATR Institute, University of New Mexico, Background Report for the 20P NM First Town Hall,Integrated Regional Transportation,special report:The Santa Fe Trails Public Transit System by Terry Nefos, 1997 zl MRGCOG, Metropolitan Transportation Planning Scenario,April 2002 22 MRGCOG, Regional Transit Authority Service Plan, 1998 23 American Public Transportation Association,"Local Coalition Workbook,"2001 24 Ibid. 25 American Public Transportation Association,"The Benefits of Public Transportation,"2002 26 American Public Transportation Association,"Local Coalition Workbook,"2001 Z7 American Public Transportation Association,"The Benefits of Public Transportation,"2002 28 Ibid. 29 UNM Center for Opinion Research,"Albuquerque Citizen Satisfaction Survey, 1997 Assessment of Policies and Services" 30 Bill Richardson for Governor press release,Oct. 14, 2002 31 ATR Institute, University of New Mexico,"Public Transportation: A Priority Link in Moving People to Work," 1998 32 ATR Institute, University of New Mexico,"Enchanted Circle Transit Study,"2001 33 MRGCOG, Regional Transit Authority Service Plan, 1998 34 31 Maier,Testimony before the NM Highway Commission,August, 2002 STPP-NM 12/12/02 6 Transit Providers in NM CITY ENTITY SUBGRANTEE OR PROGRAM 1 3037 5310 5311 5309 5307 TITLE TRANSPORTATION PROVIDER TITLE eY,., ..:.:.: : ..fer..::::.. ;:.:.: Artesiaa9p�rattde:i(P1dt2 :>:` :>; 31ti SaeoF: >.;::;::.. .......`>': .'::'. occiiro. ntallttr:..ou .:.:::........................:...:.:..:: ,.,. ... . :... ............ x:::.;::,.,,, B de NhAt:. :. : . Las Ltirras ;. aienc�a Caur3ty latenc�a Cosi1It nCY .:,::..... Albuquerque Adelante Development Center,Inc. 5310 Santa Fe Ayudantes, Inc. 5310 Angel Fire Village of Angel Fire Angel Fire Transit 3037 5311 Mid-Rio Grande Belen City of Belen RSVP 5311 Hatch Ben Archer Health Center 3037 Carlsbad Municipal Transit Carlsbad City of Carlsbad System 3037 5311 Carlsbad Carlsbad Mental Health 5310 Clovis Area Transit System Clovis City of Clovis (CATS) 3037 5311 Brimhall Coyote Canyon 5310 Cuba Village of Cuba 550 Express 3037 Artesia Door of Opportunity 5310 Albuquerque Easter Seals 5310 Espanola City of Espanola Espanola Transit 5311 Espanola City of Espanola Senior Center 5310 Red Apple Farmington City of Farmington Express 3037 5311 Fort Bayard Fort Bayard Medical Center 5310 Fort Sumner Fort Sumner Housing Authority 3037 Gallup City of Gallup 5310 Albuquerque Go-Fors Inc. 3037 Corre Caminos Silver City Grant County Transit 3037 5311 Hobbs City of Hobbs Hobbs Express 5311 Shaa'srk a' Laguna Pueblo of Laguna Transit 5310 5311 Espanola Las Cumbres Learning Center 5310 Las Vegas City of Las Vegas Meadow Express 3037 5311 Las Vegas Las Vegas Medical Center 5310 Artesia Lending Hands 5310 Silver City Life Quest Inc. 3037 Silver City Life Quest Inc. 5310 Los Alamos Bus Los Alamos Los Alamos System,Inc. 5311 Los Lunas Village of Los Lunas 3037 5311 Gallup Na'Nizhoozhi Center(NCI) 3037 Window Rock Navajo Nation Navajo Transit 5311 Carr'izozo New Horizons 5310 NMJC ACCEL Hobbs New Mexico Junior College Program 3037 Source:PTPB,NMSHTD/1212002 1 IIQIiJi� rlllVl\.iCIJ 111 IVIYI CITY ENTITY SUBGRANTEE OR PROGRAM 3037 5310 5311 5309 5307 TITLE TRANSPORTATION PROVIDER TITLE TW Santa Fe Open Hands 5310 Albuquerque PB&J Family Services,Inc. 5310 Artesia Pecos Valley Senior Center 5310 Community Portales City of Portales Services Center 5310 5311 Farmington Presbyterian Medical Services 3037 5311 Questa Village of Questa 3037 RedRiver Red River Miners Transit 5311 Los Valles Transit Espanola Rio Arriba County System 3037 Pecos Trails Roswell City of Roswell System 3037 5311 Albuquerque St. Martin's Hospitality 5310 Farmington San Juan College 3037 Bemalillo Sandoval County 3037 South Central Council of Elephant Butte Governments(SCCG Hatch) 3037 South Central Council of Elephant Butte Governments(SCCG Socorro) 3037 Taos Town of Taos Chile Line 3037 5311 Taos/Colfax County Community Taos Services,Inc. 5310 Tohatchi Area of Opportunity and Tohatchi Services,Inc. 5310 Albuquerque ITransitional Living Services,Inc. 5310 Las Cruces Tresco,Inc. 5310 Los Lunas Valencia Counseling 5310 Alamogordo Zia Therapy Center,Inc. 3037 5310 5311 Zuni Zuni Entrepreneurial Enterprises Entrepreneurial Zuni (ZEE) Enterprises 3037 5310 5311 Rlamogoido;. .. ..:.;... .::Aiamogotifo 5entos 53111 .... }Uarnogordo.:,,.., Betty DareGood&arnaritan Center :.. .... ; .. -,;,531Q Sitter Gty Bordet Aea Mehtal Health;5vcs ; 531x Taas Brtdges:P..:rofeef tor:EdGoation ...;' r.. 53 ki3 Albuquerque. _:. Casa Angep�a..:. 5310, Taos.... Casa Gofazen.. .... 53Ei3- . i�Jamogordo: .. . ouneltiigCenEeY lnc 63113, Las Cwees . : ..:.. [Iona) a.Gounty.<... 5310. .<. Taos DreaffiTPOWProtect .. 5310 Clovis .. ENIbERSH 5310:.;:.. . Ntora . k6etpingljands 531{3 Espanota Hoy A....ltsm: 5310 Ist:eta :53113 Gasa.............. LagUna Rambow.Nurstng 5310 Gallup MORE. ;I:. 53 k0 Farb on,:::: N1NNhA:S®mors..,.. ;5310 Glovts P1a1ns R:egtonak.M;edtcal Center 53113 Santa Fe Poloaque:Pueblo > 51a Source:PTPB,NMSHTD/12/2002 2 Transit Providers in NM CITY ENTITY SUBGRANTEE OR PROGRAM 1 3037 5310 5311 5309 5307 TITLE TRANSPORTATION PROVIDER TITLE (WTW) ................. .......- ....... .. .... :Pe. .................. .......... ..... ............... ....... ... ............ ........ ... 4.... ...... .... X ............ IN .......... ....... 5340 Ranc#ios de ....... ............ Taos' .... ......... ................ ........... ... ...... ......... ... ..................... .......... ............. ............ Rod k Routh .. .......... ... Albuquerque . ..... Stsa . .........V......H.....i...k. ... r x0 Urp.o...t Taos Tab County,AR G......... .... ... _xxv .5310: :.X..X..X... XY :....... .............. ...... .* .. .... .. ...... ... ........... ..................... ......... X.. Al" ......... ...... ............... ..... .... ...... .... ...................... ...... ........ .. ............ .......... ........... ........ . . .... ........ . .... . ..... ... X t a .......... ........... ......... .......... . ....... ............ . ............ . ... ..... . . ...... . .............. . -A . ...... .. .......... ......I.... ........... ..... a......... ............ .......... .......... Source:PTPB,NMSHTD 12/2002 3 � o Rp A BR �? � y GPs �� Lo \ G IV, P� -v �G y � �0 00 FZ O N r yp O Z COL 5� NROY F IRw N � � 6 Y Y 2 T IVIZ R. �O Sq G It TFF Off, O S� Z , 'A v c �- Q- Fz O � G � '� .i i NatQG1'f� �L TH,l�xS Rp Z B \O P E pyo • o' oG H 5" � n l r F FI � TERRA OF, TRIVIZ.A ANNE O � TFF SENN R•6.096 p9a 9 GH0 S AC RD N O RD T /� R GT N RD R R D S Z � i J 101 Q -70 N ? r r*A \ \ 1 �1 A\VY \ 1/ \\ / / \_ \���.\ O 0 1//J V � � �� N v � Nti c FSO G F� P s � oR �� v �� Q �<G MP � SPO � cn , � ��� OP�'� P�� � s �� ��p �2 � � c�,� 2� O'A 2 �I P �, R� E� _�.0 � G � � P .� .�� ti G � � .9 �_ °;,,� P O � � G S d �� � �,, ��"°' �� N �� ,�w AS �� J v � �P OOe N � � � ���� +.m�-nv�rn QQ � ,, n,� C 4, .'1 '' P. � —1 '" 0 � MPOO � 2� � , . .Qp M � P z ��� � Nip. � y < gFZ� m O� o Q� � s� p�P ��� G� O �� O � v2R �� � �� .G �� � Q�� 2i ? c � 2 � �2 ''�i ��. l.. . � S N � O � r0 O G m G 05 cn D 4d10 O � � S O O � O \ D � O v � i S . GR MPO . D DR. EIP H GREY P E 00 P E � O / o -o FPR � o • 1 O O O� O <O n O-o O �F o q o o d O m 5� c � d O d N yOti-51 TELSHOR BL CALLE PARAISO OUNT-B LD 2 c UFFEY ST S� so-a�� N in PORTER DR 2 N G N H ANF 2� NNnci Ht0 C Z G) C1 -V1 \ �Ma -day-.E ..'N"', gp�'Ivv M10 ........... IL r �� mak; � .. � r•,'� � �': vigt,�L� o�, (" q -' L. ._•� r G... �V � � A� �� A \1�?,� � �V��A�.�p�- �s-l�� 4{t1 � �����D_'_� 4 4 ,rte\�- \9 �-; � l f,•� '' r�� IS�pVD '��ti�}�tr�•-'t' yy-L l O - 1rt �_�� ";� 1� - -_-`•z 12 1 � o \ 'a tPi if �c?S'\ � < `_ s c9��,""���111 1 --�'�_�- Z-1-1. �1. + `1 -'\ �. �;,4>•, _ ��a \ _ L � 1v 1._�xNt� Y�fox��_:sn tt�c 1� S r L 1 p% " 14�Yy4 xvbY Vt-i m`;�-iat `.gyp \t� .-- q G \ �+t'��. 1 t�-Phi.-$ 4�.�' \f• ~•y h}v' NS uto-r- \x le- _1 - s Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report RY 2002 Original Submission 01//07/200: Street 1 City of Las Cruces Fiscal Year 6/30/2002 Street 2 P.O. BOX 20000 City Las Cruces State NM ZIP Code 88004 2380 URL w%w.las-cruces.org FTA Recipient ID 1580 Acronym RoadRUNNER Are you requesting a 9 or fewer vehicle waiver? N Organization Type Public agency or authority that directly operates all transit service(not a State DOT) Institution Type Unit of City or Municipal Government Primary UZA Las Cruces,NM-253 Service Area Mileage 50 Service Area Population 73,539 Secondary UZAs Vehicles Operated in Annual Maximum Service by Mode and Type of Service Bus/DO 9 Demand Response/DO 9 Describe Capital Investment for modes not currently in service: Seller Filing Separately(by mode and service): Bus Mode/ Comments User Date Service ID Form Mode! Issue Issue Issue Service Type # Status Issue Description Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report RY 2002 Original Submission 1/7/2003 Contact Type CEO Honorific(ex Mrs,Capt,etc) Mr. First Name Michael initial Last Name Bathoiomew Professional Title Transit Administrator Mailing Address Line 1 City of Las Cruces Mailing Address Line 2 P.O. BOX 20000 City Las Cruces State NM ZIP Code(Ex:22222) 88004 2380 Phone(Ex:(555)123-4567) (505)541-2500 Ext(ex: 1234) Fax(Ex:(555)123-4567) (505)541-2545 Email(Ex:ntduser@ntd.com) mbartholomew@las-cruces.org Notes Contact Type NTD Contact Honorific(ex Mrs,Capt,etc) Mr. First Name Earl initial Last Name Torres Professional Title Transit Operations Supervisor Mailing Address Line 1 City of Las Cruces Mailing Address Line 2 P.O. BOX 20000 City Las Cruces State NM ZIP Code(Ex:22222) 88004 2380 Phone(Ex:(553)123-4567) (505)541-2500 Ext(ex: 1234) Fax(Ex:(555)123-4567) (505)541-2545 Email(Ex: ntduser@ntd.com) earlt@las-cruces.org Notes Contact Type Safety Contact Honorific(ex Mrs,Capt,etc) Mr. First Name Earl Initial Last Name Torres Professional Title Transit Operations Supervisor Mailing Address Line 1 City of Las Cruces Mailing Address Line 2 P.O. BOX 20000 City Las Cruces State NM ZIP Code(Ex:22222) 88004 2380 Phone(Ex:(555)123-4567) (505)541-2500 Ext(ex: 1234) Fax(Ex:(565)123-4567) (505)541-2545 Email(Ex:ntduser@ntd.com) earit@las-cruces.org Notes Contact Type Security Contact Honorific(ex Mrs,Capt,etc) First Name Initial Last Name Professional Title Mailing Address Line 1 Mailing Address Line 2 City State ZIP Code(Ex:22222) Phone(Ex:(555)123-4567) Ext(ex: 1234) Fax(Ex:(555)123-4567) Email(Ex: ntduser@ntd.com) Notes i Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report RY 2002 Original Submission 1/7/2 a b c d Part A.Sources of Directly Generated Funds Funds Expended Funds Expended Funds Earned on Operations' on Capital During Period Passenger Fares for Directly Operated Service DR 34,784 MB 190.28 01 Total All Directly Operated Modes 219,309 5,755 225,064 Passenger Fares for Purchased Transportation Service MB C 02 Total All Purchased Transportation Modes 0 0 0 03 Park and Ride Parking Revenue 0 0 0 04 Other Transportation Revenues 0 0 0 Auxiliary Transportation Revenues 05 Concessions 0 0 0 06 Advertising Revenue 0 0 0 97 Other 0 0 0 08 Total Auxiliary Transportation Funds 0 0 0 09 Non Transportation Funds 0 0 0 10 Funds Accrued Through a Purchased Transportation Agreement 0 0 0 Funds Dedicated to Transit at Their Source Dedicated Taxes 11 Income Taxes 0 0 0 12 Sales Taxes 0 0 0 13 Property Taxes 0 0 0 14 Gas Taxes 0 0 0 15 Other Taxes 0 0 0 16 Bridge,Tunnel and Highway Tolls 0 0 0 17 Other Dedicated Funds 0 0 0 18 Total Funds Dedicated to Transit At Their Source 0 0 0 19 State and Local Government 0 0 0 20 Contra Account for Expenses 0 0 0 21 Net Contributed Services 0 0 0 22 Subsidy Amount 0 0 0 23 Total Directly Generated Funds 219,309 5,755 225,064 Model Comments User Date Service ID Sources of Funds--Funds Expended 3 Funds Earned(F-10) CANCEL EDT6049 10/22/02 In response to issues regarding DO revenue.The numbers given are accurate. I do not know why the 2001 EDT6049 10/24/02 database has all the Nulls MB revenue includes$58,130 subsidy from Associated Students of New Mexico State University for EDT6049 10/22/02 running the Aggie Shuttle. J Ii'-a Ls lis-ir_f� r-a. r'a+■za`ir :-,i. -. -: - Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report RY 2002 Original Submission 117/2 a b c d Part B. Federal Government Sources Funds Expended Funds Expended Funds Earned on Operations on Capital During Period Funds received from FTA 01 Capital Program Funds 0 0 02 Urbanized Area Formula Program Funds 606,762 23,018 629,780 03 Other FTA Funds 0 0 0 04 Total FTA Funds 606,762 23,018 629,780 05 Funds Received from Other USDOT Grant Programs 16,239 0 16,239 06 Other Federal Funds 0 0 0 Describe 07 Total Federal Funds 623,001 23,018 646,019 Mode/ Comments User Date Service ID Sources of Funds--Funds Expended 8 Funds Earned(F-10) CANCEL EDT6049 10!22102 In response to issues regarding DO revenue.The numbers given are accurate. I do not know why the 2001 EDT6049 10/24/02 database has all the Nulls MB revenue includes$58,130 subsidy from Associated Students of New Mexico State University for EDT6049 10/22/02 running the Aggie Shuttle. J Form Mode/ Issue Issue Issue Service Tyne # Status Issue Description J IA i is 011ie A enc ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-Ro g y adRUNNER Report RY 2002 Original Submission 1/7/ a b c d Part C.State Government Sources Funds Expended on Funds Expended on Funds Earned Operations Capital During Period 01 Funds allocated to transit out of the general revenues of the government entity 0 0 C Funds dedicated to transit at their source Dedicated Taxes Rate 02 Income taxes 0 0 0 03 Sales taxes 0 0 0 04 Property taxes 0 0 0 05 Gas taxes 0 0 0 06 Othertaxes 0 0 p Describe 07 Bridge,Tunnel and Highway Tolls 0 0 0 08 Other Dedicated Funds 0 0 0 09 Total Funds Dedicated to Transit At Their Source 0 0 0 10 Other Funds 37,024 0 37,024 Describe State Welfare to Work Grant 11 Total State Funds 37,024 0 37,024 Mode/ Comments User Date Service ID Sources of Funds.--Funds Expended&Funds Earned(F-10) CANCEL EDT6049 10/22/02 In response to issues regarding DO revenue.The numbers given are accurate. I do not know why the 20CEDT6049 10/24/02 database has all the Nulls MB revenue includes$58,130 subsidy from Associated Students of New Mexico State Universibj for EDT6049 10/22/02 running the Aggie Shuttle. Form Mode/ Issue issue Issue Service Type # Status Issue Description as t d ■a `a+ es Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Trans it-RoadRUNNE R Report RY 2002 Original Submission 1/7/ a b c d Part D.Local Government Sources Funds Expended on Funds Expended on Funds Earned Operations Capital During Period 01 Funds allocated to Transit out of the general revenues of the government entity 500,000 0 500,000 Funds dedicated to transit at their source Dedicated Taxes Rate 02 Income taxes 0 0 0 03 Sales taxes 0 0 0 04 Property taxes 0 0 0 05 Gas taxes Transfer from City's Gas tax fund 920,000 0 920,000 06 Othertaxes 0 0 0 Describe 07 Bridge,Tunnel and Highway Tolls 0 0 0 08 Other Dedicated Funds 0 0 0 09 Total Funds Dedicated to Transit At Their Source 920,000 0 920,000 10 Other Funds 736 0 736 Describe Other reimbursed expenses 11 Total Local Funds 1,420,736 0 1,420,736 �.s Mode/ Comments User Date Service ID Sources of Funds--Funds Expended&Funds Earned(F-10) CANCEL EDT6049 10/22/02 In response to issues regarding DO revenue.The numbers given are accurate. I do not know why the 2001 EDT6049 10/24/02 database has ail the Nulls MB revenue includes$58,130 subsidy from Associated Students of New Mexico State University for EDT6049 10/22102 running the Aggie Shuttle. Form Mode/ Issue Issue Issue Service Type # Status Issue Description 4. Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER` Report P,Y 2002 Original Submission 1/7/ Applied to Applied to Not Designated Total Capital Operations 01 Carryover from Prior Period 0 0 0 0 02 Total Funds Earned During the Period 2,323,088 03 Total Funds Available in Current Period 2,323,088 04 Funds Applied to Operations During the Period 2,300,070 05 Funds Applied to Capital During the Period 28,773 06 Funds Applied to Principal Payments 0 07 Total Application of Funds in Current Period 2,328,843 08 Funds Carried Over to Next Period 0 0 90,689 90,689 Model Comments Service User Date ID Sources of Funds--Funds Expended&Funds Earned(F-10) CANCEL EDT6049 10/22/02 In response to issues regarding DO revenue.The numbers given are accurate. I do not know why the 2001 EDT6049 10/24/02 database has all the Nulls MB revenue includes$58,130 subsidy from Associated Students of New Mexico State University for EDT6049 10/22/02 running the Aggie Shuttle. Form Mode/ Issue Issue Issue Service Type # Status issue Description `iS,V�K5I1V Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report RY 2002 Original Submission 1/712 a b c d e f g h Mode Service Guideway Systems Stations Facilities Rolling Stock Other Vehicles Other Total 1 DR DO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 ME PT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 tilE DO 0 0 0 0 0 18,568 10,990 29,558 Total 0 0 0 0 0 18,568 10,990 29,558 Mode/ Comments User Date Service ID Uses of Capital(F-20) New database—no 2001 data causes the"NULL"error to show up? EDT6049 10/24/02 Form Mode 1 Issue Issue Issue Service Type # Status Issue Description Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report R`(2002 Original Submission 1/7/20 a b c d e Vehicle Vehicle Non-Vehicle General Total Modal Operations Maintenance Maintenance Administration Expenses 010 041 042 160 Total Total Total Total Expense Object Class Labor(501) 01 Operators'salaries and wages(01) 228,448 0 0 02 Other salaries and wages(02) 50,980 24,875 0 228'448 0 35,177 111,032 03 Fringe Benefits(502) 87,870 6,678 0 8,103 102,651 04 Services(503) 0 0 0 0 0 Materials and Supplies(504) 05 Fuel and lubricants(01) 24,103 0 0 0 24,103 06 Tires and tubes(02) 2,483 0 0 0 2,483 07 Other Materials and supplies(99) 0 49,638 0 5,501 55,139 08 Utilities(505) 0 0 0 3,979 3,979 09 Casualty and Liability Costs(506) 0 0 0 6,000 6,000 10 Taxes(507) 0 0 0 0 0 13 Miscelaneous Expenses(509) 0 0 0 20,087 20.087 14 Expense Transfers(510) 0 0 0 0 0 15 Total Modal Expenses 393,884 81,191 0 78,847 553,922 16 Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990(ADA)-Related Expenses 89.181 Model Comments Service User Date ID Form Mode/ Issue Issue Issue Service Type # Status Issue Description IT '�- yrs •.iv v�..1.1MM v•.�IfiM ..:.. '.--. '.-,:". Agency JD: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report RY 2002 Original Submission 1/7120 a b c d e Vehicle Vehicle Non-Vehicle General Total Modal Operations Maintenance Maintenance Administration Expenses 010 041 042 160 Total Total Total Total Expense Object Class Labor(501) 01 Operators'salaries and wages(01) 519,296 0 0 0 519,296 02 Other salaries and wages(02) 59,206 74,625 0 105,433 239,264 03 Fringe Benefits(502) 154,356 20,034 0 24,286 198,676 04 Services(503) 0 0 0 0 0 Materials and Supplies(504) 05 Fuel and lubricants(01) 94,820 0 0 0 94,820 06 Tires and tubes(02) 14,438 0 0 0 14,438 07 Other Materials and supplies(99) 0 148,914 0 14,692 163,606 08 Utilities(505) 0 0 0 11,937 11,937 09 Casualty and Liability Costs(506) 0 0 0 18,000 18,000 10 Taxes(507) 0 0 0 0 0 13 Miscelaneous Expenses(509) 0 0 0 55,821 55,821 14 Expense Transfers(510) 0 0 0 0 0 15 Total Modal Expenses 842,116 243,573 0 230,169 1,315,858 ,d Mode/ Comments User Date Service ID i Form Mode/ Issue Issue Issue Service Type # Status Issue Description Agency lD: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report Ry 2002 Original Submission 1/71 a b c d e Vehicle Vehicle Non-Vehicle General Total Operations Maintenance Maintenance Administration Expenses Expense Object Class 010 041 042 160 Labor(501) Total Total Total Total 01 Operators'salaries and wages(01) 747,744 0 0 0 747,744 02 Other salaries and wages(02) 110,186 99,500 0 140,610 350,296 03 Fringe Benefits(502) 242,226 26,712 0 32,389 301,327 04 Services(503) Q 0 0 0 0 Materials and Supplies(504) 05 Fuel and lubricants(01) 118,923 0 0 0 '118,923 06 Tires and tubes(02) 16,921 0 0 0 16,921 07 Other Materials and supplies(99) 0 198,652 0 20,193 218,745 08 Utilities(505) 0 0 0 15,916 15,916 09 Casualty and Liability Costs(506) 0 0 0 24,000 24,000 10 Taxes(507) 0 0 0 0 Q Purchased Transportation(308) 11 In Report(01) 0 0 0 Q 12 Filing Separate Report(02) 0 0 Q 0 0 0 13 Miscelaneous Expenses(509) 0 0 0 75,908 75,908 14 Expense Transfers(510) 0 0 0 0 0 15 Total Modal Expenses 1,236,000 324,764 0 309,016 1,869,780 16 Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990(ADA)-Related Expenses(DR Only) 89,181 Reconciling Items Cash Non-Cash Total Expenditures Expenditures Expenses for 17 Interest Expenses(51 1) 0 Period 0 p 18 Leases and Rentals(512) 0 0 0 19 Purchase Lease Agreements(514) 0 0 0 20 Related Parties Lease Agreement(515) 0 0 0 21 Depreciation(513) 173,567 0 173,567 22 Amortization of Intangibles(513.3) 0 0 0 23 Other Reconciling Items(516) 0 0 0 24 Total Reconciling Items 173,567 0 173,567 25 Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 0 0 0 (ADA)-Related Expenses(DR Only) 26 Total Expenses from Published 2,043,347 0 2,043,347 Reports Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report RY 2002 Original Submission 1,7120 a b Passenger Stations Number of Stations Number of Facilities Number of Multi-modal Stations 01 Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990(ADA)accessible 0 02 Americans with Disabilities Ac:o`1990(ADA)non-accessible 0 03 Total Stations 0 0 04 Number of Escalators 0 O5 Number of Elevators 0 Maintenance Facilities a b c d Number of General Purpose Facilities Owned Facilities Leased from Leased from a Total Another Private Entity Public Agency 06 Serving Under 200 Vehicles 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 07 Serving 200-300 Vehicles 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 08 Serving More than 300 Vehicles 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 09 Number of Heavy Maintenance Facilities 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 10 Total Maintenance Facilities 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 Mode/ Comments User Date Service ID Form Mode I Issue Issue Issue Service Type # Status Issue Description AdWr Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report RY 2002 Original Submission 1/7/20 Maintenance Facilities a b c d Number of Genera!Purpose Facilities Owned Facilities Leased from Leased from a Total Another Private Entity Public Agency 06 Serving Under 200 Vehicles 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 07 Serving 200-300 Vehicles 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 08 Serving More than 300 Vehicles 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 09 Number of Heavy Maintenance Facilities 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 10 Total Maintenance Facilities 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 Mode/ Comments User Date Service ID Form Mode/ Issue Issue Issue Service Tyne # Status Issue Description vii C i� a "_^-4 e • {} O ^O' O G m m N m m0 ': S✓ �d I ( m M { C < C C C < C 0o 0 zzzzzzz IW _0 - `r CD CD 0 f v 0000000 4 Fi'i 0000000 aw, G v ' i m w� D D D D D o_ (v' � a CD v s r O 00 COD COD CD W OC 0 O O A W Cb tD A e n .;< OCA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 c fQ CL O (3 N CD G) Q cn C) c l(D I� n n T 0 -1 -I T o m 7 Xw rn m o 0 - a - o - ? A W W W W W C. C z 0 CT C)t CT CT Ut CJt z -• 0 _ 0 0 0 0 0 0 z z IN t y CD mD C W N N IV W N n t7 �. _ m m D c A z m ICDW N N -' N W -+ N030 m m 'T a v D to m vD M m�Dmm3Z a to Tanmo ci3 _ 0 _ O O O O OO O d a n a'IC rr� Qo' m Iti v f Sm D" r..p S ^ 0 <T3c N 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m tc a N m m so v O O G7 0`° N T T D T T T T C a Q m N � m m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m n O c� V e A N O O Cit Ut W � � 9 m y 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m p .Q C �m _0 (D ,vy A A A A S O ^_�m m <3 -t Op ? V V m V (itVD1 a s?u W O A W W N co W m n o �p m 3� _ m o N O V W A co N <m m CA Dc 3 0-o > iD I� N 3 � V W N (Jt N W -+ 7 O 0 z CL o ,c T d O i CII W W CD 07 W Q (•�'o C C C C C C C W C o D �� � tt? (n 0000000 Cw a Q a U c aZi � D > D D D D Zn I � 3 r N -+ O (D co (D (D (D co L m N O co CO O (D (D (D O (D O) V D) Ui A N o 0 0 0 0 0 o c m (c D a- v rA a ICD � a 0 � p7 � m m oa s m CD I� < z co $� D o a -I v co 0 0 � O O O O co A Z _ c Z 0 N N 0 A m _ 00 (D c I7 � y m N < Z C ICD ?A� V ... m m •-a m _ T � m m D sD�a3 fA n m m Q m C int i CO W O O O W a m o n 3 J a—m oz a 11D '' � mDa � M, O p Fr Fr o a O N< a D 3 n m c m ItoN O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a a w D m 7 W — r Qpa w nm <� 3a N 0 oel O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (p 3 N a o O �c O m m c T T T T T T T ®'� O v � i m f N r< fA (T (T O0 N m m m n O 7 �a o(l) N W W N N (D (D v v -•m co co 0 U1 N U1 N a .Q -•7 n_ W o y A -4 W; W W _(p O a W W W c V N CD oro V r O A W CT CD ¢o R. y m � w 31 m o m ' >; CVn (D W N N (00 d o r y 04 CO W <T N V co co A (D w W N O w D (p (T O V A ()i O <m m DU) t1 NW10;lernet eporfiin - - Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report Year: RY 2002 Original Submission 1/7/2 a b c d Maximum Service Vehicles 01 Vehicles operated in maximum service 9 02 Vehicles available for maximum service 11 Periods of Service Average Average Average Annual Typical Typical Typical Total Weekday Saturday Sunday 03 Time service begins 0630 0900 04 Time service ends 1915 1800 Service Supplied 05 Number of Vehicles in Operation 9 1 0 06 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 627 83 0 163,242 07 Total Actual Vehicle Hours 60 8 0 15,624 08 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 428 50 0 111,112 09 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 50 6 0 12,988 11 Charter Service Hours 0 12 School Bus Hours 0 Service Consumed 13 Unlinked Passenger Trips 186 17 0 48,060 14 Passenger Miles 0 0 0 154,848 15 Americans with Disabilities Act of 0 1990(ADA)Unlinked Passenger Trips Service Operated(Days) Weekdays Saturdays Sundays Annual Total 16 Days Schedule Operated 254 48 0 302 17 Days Not Operated Due to Strikes 0 0 0 0 18 Days Not Operated Due to Officially 0 0 0 0 Declared Emergencies Mode/ Comments Service User Date ID Form Mode/ Issue Issue Issue Service Type # Status Issue Description r� N © interna# Reporting; Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name. Las Cruces Area Transit-R..oo a.«dRUU.N.NN.ER Report Year: RY 2002 Original Submission 1/7/2 a b c d e f g h Maximum Service Vehicles 01 Vehicles operated in maximum service 9 02 Vehicles available for maximum service 17 Average Weekday Periods of Service Average Average Average Annual AM Midday PM Other Typical Typical Typical Total Peak Peak Weekday Saturday Sunday 03 Time service begins 0630 0910 04 Time service ends 1920 1810 Service Supplied 05 Number of Vehicles in Operation 9 7 0 0 0 0 0 06 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 1,390 702 0 374,329 07 Total Actual Vehicle Hours 117 55 0 32,812 08 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 1,349 676 0 363,364 09 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 109 53 0 30,660 10 Total Scheduled Vehicle Revenue Miles 1,233 852 0 360,714 11 Charter Service Hours 0 12 School Bus Hours 0 Service Consumed 13 Unlinked Passenger Trips 2,447 1,003 0 678,588 14 Passenger Miles 8,154 3,589 0 2,274,052 Service Operated(Days) Weekdays Saturdays Sundays Annual Total 16 Days Schedule Operated 258 50 0 308 17 Days Not Operated Due to Strikes 0 0 0 0 18 Days Not Operated Due to Officially 0 0 0 0 Declared Emergencies 19 Days Not Operated Due to Strikes 0 0 0 0 Directional Route Miles Total Average Monthly 19 Exclusive Right of Way 0.0 0.0 20 Controlled Access Right of Way 0.0 0.0 21 Mixed Right of Way 0.0 22 Total 0.0 0.0 Mode/ Comments User Date Service ID Form Mode/ Issue Issue Issue Service Type # Status Issue Description Agency!D:' 6049 Agency Mame. Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report PY 2002 Original Submission 1 a b c d Employee Work Hours Actual Person Count Labor Classifications Full Time Part Time Full Time -Part Time Operating Labor Employees Employees Employees Employees 01 Vehicle Operations(010) 12,192 7,248 6.0 4.0 02 Vehicle Maintenance(041) 940 0 1.4 0.0 03 Non-Vehicle Maintenance(042) 0 0 0.0 0.0 04 General Administration(160) 4,064 0 2.0 0.0 05 Total Operating Labor 17,196 7,248 9.4 4.0 06 Total Capital Labor 0 0 0.0 0.0 07 Total Labor 17,196 7,248 9.4 4.0 777, Mode/ Comments Service User Date ID Employees(R-10) DR DO THESE ARE THE CORRECT VALUES NTD6049 12/20/02 Form Mode! issue Issue Issue dr Service Type # Status Issue Description Agency ID: 6049 Agency Name: Las Cruces Area Transit-RoadRUNNER Report RY 2002 Original Submission 1 a b c d Employee Work Hours Actual Person Count Labor Classifications Full Time Part Time Full Time Part Time Operating Labor Employees Employees Employees Employees 01 Vehicle Operations(010) 29,120 21,840 14.0 12.0 02 Vehicle Maintenance(041) 2,764 0 2.6 0.0 03 Non-Vehicle Maintenance(042) 0 0 0.0 0.0 04 General Administration(160) 8,320 0 4.0 0.0 05 Total Operating Labor 40,204 21,840 20.6 12.0 06 Total Capital Labor 0 0 0.0 0.0 07 Total Labor 40,204 21,840 20.6 12.0 Mode/ Comments User Date Service ID Employees(R-10) MB DO THESE ARE THE CORRECT VALUES NTD6049 12/20/02 Form Mode/ Issue Issue Issue Service Type # Status Issue Description `• o N � o 0 in N Q G G H O M O O N G C N N y r: d N�#I N d to 1 W Z � Z cn o n C14 (N v co i. N 0 16 LL N U N O T N O C y N rn y m O L ¢ zLL d i U 7 m U = CU c e � m N = fl7 O N N R g c Z, aN LL c tl R m O o c LL LL cm �_ Cc, ; Q LL ..�,, dCL E m •m N S O « 0 N G m a a R 0 a, r - Q L m Q N N O N f6 C Ol N O O N } 2' y N d ui � N COO s m a o 0 0 0 O o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 f1 d m r C a •� b fi O O O q O O O O O O O O OLO M y Q r O O � o cc U � w - U o F w J IL d d N J cc t0 � � a # . O 4. w y O R is LL Q d e6 d T m 6> IL Q Z.64 y dU d LL 0 c M 'n � _ N ti C � 7 rn c o o w w °' w_ o C m m Q ti o ? m N N N s R ° o `m v L m ui o S a a� t o , m t o o c m C7 ut U m Y O O a a o 0 o n o 0 0 0 0 0 co C U O Q O O C Q O O O O O r Qm LO