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05-03-2000ConsolidatedPlanPMtg PUbuO HEARING ON CONSOLIDATELi r-LAN ACTION PLAN FOR 2000/2001 BRANIGAN LIBRARY MAY 31 2000 Don Fahrenkrog , Neighborhood Development Director, called the public hearing to order at405pm There were two staff members from Neighborhood Development present and seven members of the public Mr Fahrenkrog, explained the three sections of the Consolidated Plan which includes the Pian/Needs section, Strategy, and Action Plan. He also stated that this information was available at the Branigan Library, City Clerks Office, Neighborhood Development Department and the Internet. Summary information was provided for the public. Mr Fahrenkrog stated the purpose of this hearing was to give the public a formal opportunity to comment on the Consolidated Plan/Action Plan for 2000/2001 Mr Fahrenkrog then opened the floor to the public to voice their concerns. SUMMARY OF COMMENTS ARE AS FOLLOWS: Paul Borunda - Mesquite Resident Would like to see CDBGfunds used forflood control in his MesquiteNilla Mora area because he borrowed money to have his house remodeled and has to pay an additional $367 00 per year on flood insurance Stated for the record, "What about us?" Why isn't our area removed from flood zone? We need ongoing projects to end flood problems Would like to know how much money the City has used on flood.control Stated for the record that the City has spent millions on flood control and the oldest part of town still remains in the flood zone Would like to know how much money the City spent on Gallagher Pond Stated that Gallagher Pond and extension will not remove his neighborhood from the flood zone He stated that he lived 125 yards from Gallagher Pond and still in flood zone so why should he accept everyone's else's water Rose Garcia -Tierra Del Sol Director Stated that the flood issue be notated for the record and priority be given on this issue Stated thoL d letter of priority be sent to HUD iu, approval Stated that she wanted Mr Borundas' comment be written down for the record as follows, "What about us?" Why isn't our area removed from flood zone? We need ongoing projects to end flood problems Stated that in the future can Neighborhood Development consider a different terminally instead of using the word distressed for the Mesquite area. Commented prior to hearing, that the people do not want to attend "Neighborhood Police Meetings" because they did not feel comfortable talking with Policemen Louise Tracey - La Pinon (Sexual Assault Recovery Services) Director Stated that there was no feedback from the Neighborhood Development Department on how the Proposals were rated/ranked Also wanted to know how it was decided Stated that La Pinon Program was a great program in need of funds and wanted to know how to do better next time. Margaret Markhan - Las Cruces Resident Stated that Mr Borunda had a legitimate concern and that the flood zone was a critical issue Stated that all flood areas through the older part of town be reviewed. Stated for the record that she was not treated right and did not receive correct, specific information that she requested on the Home Rehabilitation Program in regards to the total amount past due, uncollected payments on Home Rehab Loans, revolving funds and total amount of money owed to the City on Home Rehab loans She also stated that a letter was sent to the City on this issue Steve Trowbridge - City Councilor, District 4 Herculano Ferraiez - Mesquite Resident Discussed the 100 year flood and stated that we need for the City to be protected as a whole Deonn Arnold - SANE (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner) Project Director There was a short discussion on the following issues. Flood control issues Land acquisition and Affordable housing Mesquite area revitalization (BAG) Mayor's Business Advisory Group Mobile homes, prefabricated homes, and stick built houses. The City Wide Public Hearing adjourned at 5 10 p m. 2 ACTION PLAN 2000 The mission of the U S Department of Housing and Urban Development(HUD)is"to help people create communities of opportunity " One of the expressed goals is to develop a viable urban community by providing decent housing and a suitable living environment, and by expanding economic opportunities, principally for low and moderate income persons. To this end, the City prepares a Consolidated Plan. The Consolidated Plan serves as both the City's planning document and its application for funding under any of HUD's major entitlement programs. These programs include Community Development Block Grant(CDBG)and the HOME Investment Partnership Program. The City's approach to addressing local needs and goals is described in the City of Las Cruces 1998-2002 Consolidated Plan The Plan identifies housing and community development needs, sets priorities, develops a strategy,and proposes action.The first two sections of the Plan,needs and strategy,were approved by Council in May of 1998 for the five year period of 1998-2002. These sections of the Plan represent a five year planning document. The Action Plan section is approved for a one year period of time. The City's 2000 Consolidated Plan, Action Plan, as approved by Council, establishes specific projects and funding levels for the 2000/2001 fiscal year With input from Council at the April 10, 2000 Work Session and recommendations from the Health and Human Services Advisory Committee,the 2000 Consolidated Plan,Action Plan section,was drafted In accordance with HUD regulations,the Plan was made available to the public for a 30 day review and comment.The Plan must be submitted to HUD by May 15, 2000 The Action Plan presented for final approval contains one change from the original draft. $30,000 of additional unspent prior years funds were included to increase available funding for street improvements. PUBLIC SERVICES $179,700 Housing Authority $25,000 Big Brother/Big Sister $25,000 Court Youth Center $38,620 FYI -Youth Supervision $20,777 Community of Hope $40,000 FYI -Youth Safe House $15,000 Hacienda Del Sol $15,303 ADMINISTRATION City Administration $282,300 HOUSING $762,950 Home Rehabilitation (sewer line connection) $210,000 Weatherization (CAA) $89,000 Payment Saver $180,000 CHDO 15% set-aside(required) $70,350 Property Acquisition (affordable housing) $195,600 School House Project(public schools) $18,000 PUBLIC FACILITIES $756,521 ADA improvements, existing sidewalks $75,000 San Pedro $318,469 Sidewalks $363,052 Idaho, Solano-Luna Nevada, Solano- Rio Grande Arizona, 1/2 Solano- Rio Grande Luna, Idaho-Colorado Espanola, Idaho-Colorado Pecos, Boutz- N. End GRAND TOTAL $1,981,471 NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 528-3105 http.//www.las-cruces.org/housing.htm The mission of City of Las Cruces Neighborhood Development Department is "to help people create neighborhoods of opportunity " One of the expressed goals is to develop a viable urban community by providing decent housing and a suitable living environment and by expanding economic opportunities, principally for low and moderate income persons Recognized as an entitlement city by the U S Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Neighborhood Development Department administers HUD Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME Investment Partnership Program entitlement funds The CDBG program deals with general urban needs such as housing, neighborhood revitalization, improvement to community facilities and infrastructure, and activities or services aiding low and moderate income families The HOME program focuses only on housing issues The City's approach to the addressing local needs and goals is described in the City of Las Cruces Consolidated Plan The Consolidated Plan serves as both the City's planning document and application under any of HUD's major entitlement programs such as CDBG, HOME and Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) The ESG program provides resources to operate and to improve the quality of emergency shelters Although the City's Consolidated Plan is required to address homeless or ESG Program issues,the City is not a direct recipient of ESG funds These funds are accessed through the State The Consolidated Plan identifies housing and community development needs, sets priorities, develops a strategy, and proposes action The Neighborhood Development Department is charged with drafting the plan for public consideration and City Council action The Plan was prepared using U S Census data on housing characteristics for the Las Cruces Metropolitan Area, surveys of residents, citizen input from public meetings, information from public and private providers of services, recommendations from the Community Development Advisory Committee and direction from the City Council The Consolidated Plan is composed of three major sections These sections include 1 Needs 1998-2002; 2 Strategic Plan 1998-2002; and 3 1999 Action Plan The first section of the Plan inventories housing and other needs in the community The second section establishes five year goals and priorities that are being addressed by the City The Third section includes the specific activities that the City will undertake for the current year The activities undertaken each year must address the priorities as established in the Strategic Plan The essence of the Plan is captured in the Executive Summary The City is required to update the plan by following a detailed citizen participation process The process continues when the draft plan is presented to the community and City Council The City Council reviews the plan approves it in final form The draft plan is subject to change and modification by Council The Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) is the federal government's primary means to support local efforts in the regeneration and stabilization of neighborhoods CONSOLIDATED PLAN The CDBG and HOME programs further the goal of reinventing government by incorporating public input. The instrument to accomplish this goal is the City's Consolidated Plan Eligible Programs For project to be eligible for inclusion in the Consolidated Plan (Action Plan section) programs 1 Must meet one of the national goals, and 2 Must fall under one of HUD's list of accepted activities, 3 Must be consistent with the Consolidated Plan Priorities City of Las Cruces 1998-2002 Consolidated Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Neighborhood Development Department (505) 528-3105 Recognized as an entitlement city by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the City of Las Cruces is required to develop and submit a Consolidated Plan The Consolidated Plan serves as both the City's planning document and its application for funding under any of HUD's major entitlement programs These programs include Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnership Program and Emergency Shelter Grant(ESG) The CDBG program deals with general urban needs such as housing, neighborhood revitalization, improvement to community facilities and infrastructure, and activities or services aiding low and moderate income families The HOME program focuses only on housing issues The ESG program provides grants to operate and to improve the quality of existing emergency shelters and to increase the number of developing shelters for the homeless Although the City's Consolidated Plan is required to address homeless or ESG Program issues, the City is not a direct recipient of ESG funds These funds are accessed through the State The mission of the U S Department of Housing and Urban Development(HUD) is"to help people create communities of opportunity " One of the expressed goals is to develop a viable urban community by providing decent housing and a suitable living environment,and by expanding economic opportunities, principally for low and moderate income persons To this end,the Plan identifies housing and community development needs,sets priorities, develops a strategy, and proposes action The Community Development (CD) Office of the City is charged with drafting the plan for public consideration and City Council action To prepare the draft of the plan, the CD Office used U S Census data on housing characteristics for the Las Cruces Metropolitan Area, surveys of residents, one conducted as recently as 1997, citizen input from public meetings, information from public and private providers of services, recommendations from the Community Development Advisory Committee and direction from the City Council NEEDS Between 1980 and 1990, Las Cruces experienced a 38%growth in population and saw the number of households increase by 17,000 During this same period, there was a marked increase in numbers of people experiencing housing problems, which is defined as paying more than 30% of their income for housing or living in dwellings which are overcrowded or lack adequate plumbing For low and moderate income renters, problems related to housing increased by 75%from 1980 to 1990, mostly due to inadequate income Since housing costs and income grew at the same rates, it is estimated that most low and moderate income households pay more than 30% of their income for rental housing Nearly half pay more than 50% of their income for rent. A disturbing decline also was observed in the number of residents who own their homes, ownership rates fell from 60% in 1980 to 56% in 1990 One-quarter of home owners in Las Cruces experience housing problems, much of it related to percentage of income spent on housing Nearly 70% of very low income people spend more than 30% of their income on housing costs The factors of economics, race, and ethnicity also reveal need Of the very low income minority households in Las Cruces, 71% of renters and 66% of homeowners experience housing problems Distressed neighborhoods result when families live in inadequate housing conditions Dwellings deteriorate and become unsafe places to live About 650 renter-occupied units in Las Cruces are estimated to be substandard, and more than 500 owner-occupied units fall in this category At the present time 248 low income homeowners are on awaiting list for the City's Home Rehabilitation Program As neighborhoods are increasingly distressed, they become undesirable areas in which to live or invest in economic development, creating a downward spiral for the families who live in them Citizens from these neighborhoods who have met with City representatives report associated problems of crime, litter, traffic hazards, and disaffected youth Inadequate infrastructure is also a concern, including lack of parks, sidewalks, roads, and street lights, ineffective storm drainage, and inadequate or unaffordable utilities Homelessness is one of the symptoms of housing problems in the city Estimates of the numbers of people who do not have a fixed, regular, and adequate night time residence vary widely and are difficult to document. Based on national statistics, Las Cruces may have 218 homeless people at any single point in time Estimates from local advocates range from 650 to 2,000 Families constitute most of the City's homeless population Eighty-nine percent of the households are unemployed Ten percent are employed full or part time, and the balance are retired Subpopulations of homeless people include those with long-term mental illness,those with alcohol and drug addictions, and youth who are not yet emancipated but live outside their parents' homes Although there are transitional living facilities for these subpopulations, the capacities are very small and emergency shelter services are not readily available for their special needs In addition to shelter, homeless people's needs include case management, food, transportation,education,job training,jobs, child care, medical and behavioral health care, and permanent housing In 1997, Las Cruces residents ranked the importance of multiple services, facilities or needs through a survey Their responses were analyzed for differences according to whether they fell into the low income or not-low income group Highly important to both economic groups were the following youth centers and programs, recycling, water, job creation, attracting more industry, and helping small businesses get started Some differences between groups occurred Highly important to the low income group were crime awareness and health services Highly important to the not-low income group was job training In the category of housing, low income housing construction was more important to the low income group whereas homeless programs and facilities were more important to the not-low income group STRATEGIC PLAN Priorities. As part of an effort to draft a strategy, the Community Development Advisory Committee established priorities based on needs In the area of housing, affordable home ownership was designated as a high priority for very low income people and as a medium priority for low and moderate income people Affordable rental housing for large households was a medium priority for very low and low income people and a low priority for moderate income people Affordable rental housing for small households was designated as a low priority With regard to homelessness, emergency and transitional shelters and permanent supportive housing for persons with special needs were given a low to medium priority Other categories of homeless programs were seen as lower priority In addition to housing needs, priority community development needs were considered by the Advisory Committee Those designated as high priority were youth centers, parks and recreation facilities, street and sidewalk improvements, flood drain improvements, sewer improvements,transportation improvements,and accessibility needs Medium priority was given to child care centers, health facilities, handicapped services, youth services, employment training, crime awareness, and planning The priority needs as included in the Plan are attached Strategy A proposed strategy has developed from the prioritization of needs Increasing and maintaining the City's affordable housing stock, revitalizing distressed neighborhoods, and a focus on serving youth and families are major segments of the plan There is an inescapable correlation between home ownership and the quality of a community Studies show that communities where the ratio of home ownership is high experience lower crime rates, increased voter participation,greater volunteerism, improved student performance in school, and in general fewer social problems Therefore it is good public policy for the city to promote home ownership The affordable housing strategy brings together many segments of the community to promote opportunities for first-time home ownership among low income people In addition, it addresses the need of maintaining and improving the existing homes owned by low and moderate income families Under the plan, nonprofit housing organizations such as Tierra del Sol and Habitat for Humanity, for-profit builders, lenders, the Housing Authority of the City of Las Cruces (HACLC), and the City will form partnerships to construct new affordable homes or purchase, rehabilitate and resell existing homes Through the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority program, partnerships between lenders and the City will be promoted, and eligible home buyers will benefit from 0%second mortgages for assistance with down payments, closing costs, and reduction of principal balance To focus efforts within low income neighborhoods, it is proposed that the City designate a distressed neighborhood encompassing the Mesquite Street/Original Townsite Historic v District and extending as far north as Madrid Avenue and as far south as Idaho Avenue Within this area, the neighborhood would be improved one block at a time The City would purchase the vacant or abandoned property where available and would offer families on the block priority in receiving weatherization, home rehabilitation,or reconstruction services on their homes Their participation would be voluntary The vacant property would become the site of affordable new home construction by private contractors and/or nonprofit housing organizations Through the new Infill Development Process, the City would expedite and reduce regulations for construction of affordable housing benefitting low income families, first time home buyers, and/or persons with disabilities A neighborhood specialist would work with community groups to empower them to address the needs they have identified Entitlement and other City resources would be directed toward solving problems of crime, traffic hazards, code violations, and litter Services for youth will help prevent the growth of gangs The anticipated result is the creation neighborhoods which can attract economic development as well as be safe and environmentally pleasant places in which to live Increasing homeownership and maintaining the quality of existing homes should positively impact affordable rental housing The City will continue to make Community Development Block Grant and HOME funds available to nonprofit housing corporations through existing subgrant and contract processes and will generally support their applications for funding from other entities With regard to homelessness, the City has participated in the building or renovation of the three major shelters,the Gospel Rescue Mission,the Mesilla Valley Homeless Shelter, and La Casa, Inc. With a past emphasis on structures, the more immediate concern would be continued operational funds The City recognizes the need for "safety net" services and will continue to make Community Development Block Grant funds available to organizations providing service for homeless through existing subgrant and contract processes and will generally support their applications for funding from other entities The City strongly supports the need for ESG funds from the state for local shelter and service operations The city's affordable housing strategy integrated with a focus on distressed neighborhoods and youth provides the city with a plan for undertaking the expressed mission and goal for community development. 1 CI'T'Y OF LAS CRUCES INTER-DEPARTMENTAL MEMORANDUM TO Jim Ericson, Interim City Manager n '4 FROM. Don Fahrenkrog, Neighborhood Development Director 3 6 SUBJECT Public Comment, Consolidated Plan 2000 F EN DATE May 5, 2000 Two public hearings were held to accept comments on the 2000 Consolidated Plan on May 3 at 4 00 p m., and May 4 at 6 00 p m At the May 3 meeting 7 members of the public, one City Councilor and 2 staff members attended. At the May 4 meeting,2 members of the public attended and 1 staff member A copy of the two sign in sheets are included. At the May 3 meeting there were a number of comments. Notes of those comments are attached. None of the comments appeared directly related to the issue of the 2000 Consolidated Plan. At the May 4 meeting there was general discussion about representation at public meetings, Housing, the City budget, the new City Manager, and grants verses loans. None of these issues relate to the 2000 Consolidated Plan. In response to the specific request for comments, the response was that there were no problems with the Plan. The public comment period forthe Plan began April 15,2000 and continues through May 15,2000 The public need not attend a public meeting to comment on the Plan. Comments may be phoned or mailed to the City anytime during the comment period. No additional comments have been received to date alt's NA M F_ Lt kj CA 0 .2 1 Lf 5 ic 12 — IV 7/ -o se-- 910 e. doh a-i S.7110—A ec/ Ilya elf t L pl rAo�-j Y/9 uj. ,S,�n,5 (L:. PUBLIC HEARING - MAY 4, 2000 6.00 - 700PM BRANIGAN LIBRARY - DRESP ROOMS AIB (PLEASE PRINT) NAME ADDRESS TP-HONE NUMBER �8 (2, `TAW\ 5 ✓7- G'c�-