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CIAC 11-17-16City of Las Cruces° P E O P L E N E L P I N 6 P E O P L E Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Minutes for the Meeting on November 17, 2016 1:30 p.m. Utilities Center Conference Room 218 Committee Members Present: Ronald Johnson, Chairman William Beerman, Vice -Chairman Gilbert Lujan, Committee Member Jerry Nachison, Committee Member Eugene Suttmiller, Committee Member City Staff Present: Carl Clark, RESTS Administrator Sonya Delgado, Parks and Recreation Director Eric Enriquez, LCFD Chief Eric Martin, Facilities Management Administrator Carolynn Rouse, Office Assistant Senior Alma Ruiz, Office Manager Senior Jaime Montoya, LCPD Chief Chair Johnson: Called the meeting to order at approximately 1:32 p.m. 1. Acceptance of the Agenda: Chair Johnson: We have an agenda before us, have we all reviewed it? Can I have a motion to approve it? Suttmiller: I so motion. Chair Johnson: I have a motion. Second? Beerman: Second. Chair Johnson: I have a second. All in favor? Aye. Suttmiller: Aye. Beerman: Aye. Nachison: Aye. Lujan: Aye. The Agenda was Accepted Unanimously 5-0. Page 1 of 28 Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 2. Acceptance of the Minutes: a. Regular Meeting of October 20,2016 Page 2 of 28 Chair Johnson: We have the minutes of October 20t". Well, let's first have a motion before any comments. Do we have a motion? Suttmiller: I'll make a motion. Nachison: Second. Chair Johnson: We've got a motion and a Second. Any comments regarding the minutes? We have a motion and a second, all those in favor say Aye. Aye. Beerman: Aye. Suttmiller: Aye. Nachison: Aye. Lujan: Aye. Chair Johnson: Thank you, motion approved. The Minutes were Accepted Unanimously 5-0. 3. New Business: Chair Johnson: The New Business, I have the pleasure of introducing our fifth member and now we are a full Board, and I'm going to give our new member a chance to introduce himself. Lujan: Thank you, my name is Gilbert Lujan and I am a realtor here in town. I've been a realtor for over three (3) years now, and also have owned my own business for about five (5). I'm looking forward to learning a lot on this Board and asking a lot of questions, so I'm looking forward to it. Thank you for having me on board. Chair Johnson: Thank you for joining us. We don't always have to work too much worrying about quorums anymore. It makes it easier. You'll notice the Vice Chairman is sitting to your left, so that when I'm gone he's the Chairman. 4. Old Business: Chair Johnson: Old business, do we have a presenter? Why don't we go to 4b and have our presentation on Current Public Safety Projects. Introduce yourself and usual and lead us through it. Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 3 of 28 Martin: Good Afternoon, members of the Capital Improvement Advisory Committee and Chair. My name is Eric Martin, I'm with the Public Works Department/Facilities Management Section, and the portion of that I will be speaking about today is the upcoming Public Safety Complex that is currently under construction. I know we have some new Board members here, so I've added a little bit of history to bring everyone up to speed a little bit and then, of course, I'll be glad to stand for any questions. Nachison: Excuse me, Eric, can you speak up a little bit please? Martin: Yes sir. Nachison: Thank you. Martin: What you see here is an aerial view of the acreage that we acquired from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) for the recreation of Public Works use. It's approximately 350 acres, and it is located off the northeast corner of East Lohman and Sonoma Ranch Boulevard behind those neighborhoods that are right there. Our area that we'll be dealing with in terms of construction, the complex is going in this area right here. What we did is we carved out about 50 acres in that lower corner there on Sonoma Ranch, it's the roadway you see there at the bottom. What we are doing is constructing the complex as you see in the lower left hand corner here. What we left room for in Zone 4 was to have additional pad sites located potentially in these areas higher up the hill, so at such time as if Police or Fire wanted to build some type of other training academy or to have some type of analysis testing labs, those kinds of things, we have the opportunities and room to put those kinds of things up there. The roadway that you see there, since this only covers about 50 of the 350 acres of this roadway you see here, ultimately you can go through the rest of the property because the rest of the property outside of the public safety component is for recreation and public purposes. We have the opportunity in the future to potentially add ball fields, tram networks, things like that; because under a Recreation and Public Purpose (R&PP) Lease, not only can we use it to build buildings and amenities for the public purpose, but also to allow us to engage in recreational opportunities. One of the things that BLM has spoken about us with related to this property, if you're familiar with Desert Trails Community Park, and so that 30 acres or so of natural environment with a trail head for fitness that goes through it for various capacities. You have ADA components as well as those that like hiking up and down the trails. We can do the same thing here. What we'd like is to leave as much of that 350 acres as possible as natural environment, other than in those areas where it would make sense for the city to construct the facilities. Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 4 of 28 The overall general site plan is what you see here. The building is basically a 2'/Z-story building, and this is the basement area which is where the exercise and other activities would take place. The ground floor will support both Police and Fire and what would be out here would be Fire Station 8, as well as the Police Department's East Side Command. The upper floor is primarily Police. We are kind of sitting in a bowl, so some of the design considerations that we utilized is when we had our public input meetings, we had residents that were concerned about their sight lines to the mountains, things like that, and so given the area that was selected, we need those sight lines so we are not impeding anyone's view. The colors of the building are going to be neutral Southwest desert kinds of colors: whites, tans, those kinds of things; and that way it blends in with the environment. It will be a nice complex. It will be visible from the road and as far as the neighbors are concerned, they probably will not normally know it's there. Chair Johnson: Do you have the floor plan for each floor? Martin: Not with me, sir. If you'd like for me to bring that back to a future meeting, then I will certainly do that, Mr. Chairman. Chair Johnson: That would be great, and the square footage on each floor. Martin: Okay, yes sir. Chair Johnson: That would be good. Martin: In the daytime, if you were coming up Sonoma Ranch and coming up the driveway to the building, this is basically what it would look like coming into the site. At night it will be lit, but the lighting will be subdued so that we don't impact the neighborhood greatly in terms of night lighting all night long. As you can see in the other picture, that's basically the view you see from Sonoma Ranch, and then if you're coming up the driveway, of course, you can see the doors for Fire Station 8 and the entrance to the facility. As of November 7, 2016, at the time I turned in the presentation, the building was approximately 80% complete, and they have just about every trade imaginable on site right now. They are pushing very hard to get the building as close to finished by the end of this calendar year. That's the deadline we have given them, so we will see how close we hit that. What you see here is just general construction pictures, some things that have changed here in the last week and one-half as they move along, but suffice it to say they are getting exterior and ground work and other things in place; parking lots, etcetera. The other two pictures you see here are of the interior work that's going on, where they've gotten duct work in place, getting electrical in, getting sheetrock up, as they get the flooring and the finishes and all the other items that go with it. Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Page 5 of 28 Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Chair Johnson: This will function as a technical Police Station and Fire Station? Martin: Yes, sir. Fire Station 8 will be a standard fire station out at this location. Police Department is basically separating out between the East Side Command and the West Side Command. There are some reorganizations that police will be doing based on what's currently at the location on Picacho, and what operations and things they can move up to the East Mesa Complex. Chair Johnson: Will they have confinement facilities at this Police Station? Chief Montoya: Chairman Johnson, there will not be a really self-sufficient East Area Command, because we have an evidence section at the main building so we can't have an evidence section there. We can put evidence there, but we will have to take it and bring it back to the main station. Traffic, we have Traffic officers, we can't split the Traffic section to do stuff at the East Side and West Side. It would be housed at the main building, so we will have an East Area command up there for East Mesa Public Safety. Our Codes and ACO Officers will move out of Medpark up to that complex, and our Special Services people that were at the old Magistrate Court building, they will vacate that and go up to East Mesa Public Safety. We are trying to split up that load as best as we can, but we realize that it can't be self-sufficient, but we are trying the best we can to make the people of that area able to go to that building to get a police report and have services for that area. Chair Johnson: It would be nice if we had a list of the activities that are going to be there and what's going to be at the other facilities. Martin: Mr. Chairman, certainly. I will work with Police and Fire and we certainly can get something back to the Board. Chair Johnson: Good. Martin: As part of our sustainability approach, in terms of trying to be "Green" as we call it and trying to work with BLM on utilization of the property, ultimately there will be trails that connect to that part of the campus. We're leaving a natural buffer between the building and the surrounding residential neighborhood, so it's a fairly large recreational buffer there. We'll be incorporating benches, bike racks, taking a campus approach so that if we add additional buildings for a crime lab or other sites, they are not all going to be butted right up against each other so it's just one big giant 100,000 square foot building. They are designed to be broken out so that you can add vegetation, trees, trails. Not only do you have those exercise amenities, but what we call massing, which is things are broken up so it looks much more like a campus and that's more conducive to the types of operations that are being done. As a citizen, you're visiting; you Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 6 of 28 know exactly where you need to go, but we are also encouraging health and wellness, walking between the buildings, things like that. To help reduce our reliance on water, we are using xeriscaping. We will also be doing on -site ponding to help address any flood control type of issues, using as many trees and native plant materials as we can that fit within the overall area. The other thing we are trying to do with these approaches is to work with Sonya's staff in Parks and Recreation to help make the maintenance and management of the grounds a lot easier as well, and so we've been working together with the different departments to help make this happen. After the main part of the project is complete, through what's called our Hold Harmless Gross Receipts Taxes, we will be putting solar power -covered, solar shading on the parking area of the building. I will get you more details at a future meeting. Our contractor and others are using as much local and recycled contents as we can in the building itself, furnishings, things like that, so that we are reusing materials and using recycled materials when we can. We have energy -efficient mechanical systems and then part of the building orientation is to account for where the sun is, to help minimize impacts from the sun in terms of heat, angle of sun, those kinds of things and if you noticed in the earlier pictures, a lot of glass, because one of the things that's been found in studies over the years is that day lighting into the interior of the building is more productive and better for the employees and citizens who visit the location, compared to everything being under artificial light. We are trying to take and marry all these kinds of requirements and needs together to make it a good workable building. Suttmiller: Will the building get a green certification when it's complete or will be there at that level? Martin: We will start the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), Mr. Chairman, Board member. We will start the certification process as far as submitting for the points once the building is substantially complete. In other words, they'll be starting to move in, we have to blow out the building to help minimize the impacts of off -gassing from materials, those kinds of things. We will be bringing our LEED consultant in and they will be going through and doing an initial certification process to verify and make sure all the parameters and everything are where they need to be. Once that's done, then we will put all the information together for the architect and the contractor, and then all that will be then submitted to the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). Then they will evaluate our requests and that kinds of things to see whether we come back as LEED Gold, LEED Silver, whatever that level is that we achieve at that time. Some of those things, even though we have installed the various materials and systems and everything, we don't know yet that the USGBC will give us every single point that we've requested as part of the verification process. Here's what was designed, here's what was installed; did we match, did we do better, Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 7 of 28 did we do worse, what happened there, etcetera. That process may be going for several months after the building is open, it may be a year from now before we know what the certification notice is. Suttmiller: That's interesting. Chair Johnson: Does that certification level lead to any financial benefit to you, or just bragging rights? Martin: Actually, a couple of things. One, Mr. Chairman, yes, bragging rights just so we can say we've got a LEED X-type building. Basically, what it signifies also, to the citizens and to the community and what have you, is that we are looking at those kinds of things that meet green sustainability approaches to building. Chair Johnson: Awareness. Martin: Yes, awareness, that's right. That we have gone down that path, and we've tried to deal with these different areas that provide an overall benefit to the City. Theoretically, in the long term, if we put in energy -efficient systems, we put in our solar, we end up being say a LEED Silver or a LEED Gold building. We most likely will save on our energy cost and utility cost in the long term, and improve morale among employees that are working in the building through all these different steps that we have taken. So, there is a benefit to the City, it's not necessarily quantifiable to a specific dollar amount in certain areas, but we are taking steps to be sustainable to reduce our maintenance cost so it's easier for Parks and us to maintain the building and the grounds, etcetera. Martin: Hopefully, Mr. Chairman, that answers your question. Chair Johnson: A lot of us who have put in solar do risk assessment before we do it, to see when the return is going to come back and so on and so forth. I know that it's more difficult for you. Martin: On this one, Mr. Chairman, the return is probably going to be 12 to 15 years, but the life of the solar system is expected to be a minimum of 25 years. So, even if the electric bills go up a little bit, and you have figured in escalation clauses and the costs of everything, the system will pay for itself in 15 years or less. After that, it's a reduction on our electric bills and everything on going from there. Chair Johnson: Does anybody have any questions, given the magnitude of this project? I think it's great, by the way. I drive by it just about every other day. Questions? Beerman I have a question. You said that 50 acres of the 250 acres are for the Public Safety Building, and I could be wrong, but I think I read that all 250 acres were zoned high -intensity commercial? Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 8 of 28 Martin: Mr. Chairman, Board member, it's 350 acres overall. The only zoning, BLM as a federal agency, doesn't really recognize zoning. From their perspective, they are not concerned about that, it's federal land. So, the only time we have gone back to Council through the appropriate Planning and Zoning Boards was just for that additional 50-acre area to zone it. I believe it is commercial high - intensity we're having to allow us to do what we are doing, but that's it. What we will end up doing is going back to Planning and Zoning and going back to the rest of the process as we work with Parks and Recreation for development along with the other side, and at that time we will then come back for City purposes and begin to zone the rest of the area based on its intended uses. Our focus was just on the initial development of this campus. Chair Johnson: So, Eric, there are no covenants that would prevent a retail center from going in there, let's say in five (5) years, on the other 300 acres? Or are there covenants? Martin: Mr. Chairman, the entire 350 acres is under City control. Chair Johnson: Under City control? Martin: Yes sir. When we did the R&PP lease when we started the process, initially we were looking at only about maybe 20 acres approximately just to focus on this, but BLM indicated to us that, "Hey, there's 350 acres but if you want all of them, let's talk." So we said let's do that, because when we look at the growth of the City to the east, to the northeast, it may be that 25 to 30 years from now this is the center of the town. We figured because right now is a really good time to get good prices from BLM. Our lease on this is very beneficial to the city. Ten dollars an acre, if even that. Sonya, do you remember what it is? Delgado: It depends, but I think I want to say seven (7) dollars. Martin: I apologize for not having the exact dollar amount in front of me, but the lease on this property is very beneficial to the City. Even if it's six (6) or seven (7) dollars an acre, we are talking $2,100.00 a year. Chair Johnson: Is it a 99-year lease? Martin: No, what it is, is it's for five (5) years initial and under the recreation and public lease process, the ultimate goal is BLM does not want this property back. So, once they've leased it to the governmental entity section, a municipality, which is us, they really don't want the property back. They are saying, "Let's give it to you and you can go do something with it." When the five (5) years is up, we sit down with BLM and review and say, "Okay, here's where we're at." We have already submitted a master developmental plan of what we plan to do with the whole 350 acres. As long as we have made substantial progress or pretty close Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 9 of 28 in different areas, the goal then is to go to a patent where they will then permanently transfer the property to us and it will be City property for perpetuity. Suttmiller: My question would be, they're not going to be very happy if you put a mall in? Martin: No. Suttmiller: Sold the land and put a mall in, you can't do that. It's for recreation and public purpose. Martin: Mr. Chairman, Board member, no we are not allowed to sell the land off in bits and pieces. It has to stay under government control. Suttmiller: Even if you kept the land and allowed a mall to go on there for instance, or a high -intensity, apartment complex and lease the land to them, they would still probably go through the roof. Martin: Mr. Chairman, Board member, no. We cannot even do that. Suttmiller: That's what I thought. Martin: In other words, BLM, at the outset of this whole process had actually been interested in relocating their facility from, I think it's Marquess Street of off Farney, in that area to that site. The school district previously approached us about maybe building a school on the north end of the site. What we would actually have to do is go back to the BLM and relinquish a certain amount of acreage, and rewrite the entire agreement, and so that would be something that the City Manager and City Council would have to look at. Suttmiller: That's what I thought. Martin: If a private developer wanted to come in and build an apartment complex on 25 acres, we would have to go back to BLM and say we wish to relinquish this 25 acres over here because they want to negotiate directly with you to do something to that piece of the property. So as a City, a municipality, we can't go in and just start giving it out to private interests. We have to maintain it under government control or perpetuity unless we go through this whole process, and our initial process took almost two (2) years. Suttmiller: That's what I thought. I thought it was a lot tighter with we got it, we can do what we want with it. Martin: No, it's very tight in this type of situation we have a responsibility and a commitment to develop the site. Now there's latitude with that, we may say we will think about ball fields, we will think about this, we will think about that. But then Sonya and her staff, as they go through the whole Park Impact Fee Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 10 of 28 process, they may say the demands for that part of the East Mesa have changed from the time that we submitted the original R&PP lease. In that case, we go back to BLM and it's pretty much just a straightforward process, it doesn't take two (2) years saying, "Well, we are going to probably build soccer fields over here instead of baseball fields." We changed the plan, and it's still recreational, and they don't get into the level of detail that if you move the trail from over here a hundred feet this way, they don't care. As long as we build some trails and do some things, that's what they are after, and our long-term goal is to get the property turned over to us so we're not paying a lease on it and it becomes municipal property. Then, we have the latitude as the City expands in that direction and Public Works or Streets and Traffic needed to put another yard up there to keep some tractors and things to do snow removal equipment, things like that, we can then build a building for that property saying, "Okay, we now have another City function that needs to run out of here." Could we put a branch library there? Yes, we could. There's a lot of latitude as long as it's for municipal purposes. Chair Johnson: Hypothetically, because you're under a lease, Eric, and given political times do change, could they take back the land and our beautiful building? Because it's under their control in a couple of years? Martin: Theoretically, the federal government Mr. Chairman, could do whatever they wanted to do. Chair Johnson: That's what I'm saying, because it's a lease. Martin: Yes, that is true. Do we think that eventuality would occur where they come back and ask us to tear down the building? Chair Johnson: I was just hoping that they would own it, that 50 acres, after you built your building on it. Martin: Well from patent perspective, we would own and so at some time in the future we could go back to BLM and either patent the entire 350 acres, or potentially enter into negotiations to patent a portion of it. Let's say there was some type of claw back the federal government decided to do. Probably the City, to protect our buildings that we do own, is probably we'd then say, "Okay, let's carve out this 50 acres we zoned and took care of. We will take that, we will patent that because we built what we said we would build, and then you all have the other 300 acres to do what you want with it." Chair Johnson: I don't want to give up any of it, but I'm just worried about the eventuality. Martin: We would certainly review if such an eventuality occurred, we'd review with City Management's legal office our options and how we protect the City's interest Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 11 of 28 but in general, this has been all the way through the Department of the Interior, the Secretary of the Interior. It's unlikely Chair Johnson: We'll get a new Secretary of the Interior. Martin: Mr. Chairman, that's true. Who knows, we will see how things play out. Chair Johnson: In my opinion, that's a great project. We can go onto your next one, if you have anything else. Martin: On the Public Safety Impact Fees, real briefly, we have a handful of contracts of local architects. Williams Design Group is the one who is designing the building for us. White Sands Construction of Alamogordo is doing the construction, and A Mountain Construction and Cypress Communications are handling the road and fiber optics communication activity to that location. We are shooting for substantial completion hopefully by December 31st. Like I said, they were at 80% a little over a week and one-half ago. We have met with the contractor, we are still reviewing options. Basically, the basement is in pretty good shape, the ground floor is in pretty good shape. The second floor is a little iffy right now, but they have brought in all the different trades, they plan on working over the holidays as best they can. Suttmiller: The building is closed, right? They have closed the building, what I mean by that is enclosed? Martin: Mr. Chairman, Board member, yes. The building is primarily enclosed. There's one area on the second floor that is open so they can get large quantities of building materials into the building and things. But yes, they are installing glass and getting everything into place so it's pretty much they can work on the west side. Suttmiller: Weather is becoming negligible, except for the paving? Martin: Mr. Chairman, Board member, that's correct. Yes, Jerry? Nachison: When is the planned occupancy date? Martin: Our goal is to start moving in by December 31, 2016. That's the stated goal that we have given to the contractor. We have been talking with Police and Fire and we are just looking at the logistics as we get closer to that time, recertification processes and things like that. What makes sense in terms of their operations, what makes sense where the building is at that time, and so we will be evaluating much more closely here in about another month, kind of how that will work. Chair Johnson: The operational date would probably be 60 days from move -in? Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 12 of 28 Martin: Mr. Chairman, I'm not sure what your ramp -up time would be from the time of moving in to what you consider to be operational. I'll refer that to the Chiefs. Chief Montoya: Chairman Johnson, I would expect us as we move in to be operational. We are working right now at our main building, our area command building. We are still doing everything that we normally do and once we get our folks in there, I don't see any or maybe a slight downturn while we kind of get things going. When we get everything put in place and get it blown out, we should be able to move in and start our operations right away. Chair Johnson: Great. Martin: Also, as far as Public Safety Impact Fees, let's go there We are using some funds there for the building which the CIP (Capital Improvement Plan) allows us to do with the furnishings, and also the procurement of a new fire truck for that location, that is the new engine. They currently have it at Station 5, so it's here ready to go and so since Fire gave us the go ahead to occupy the new bays there at Station 8, then of course everything will be moved up to that area. Collection -wise, in terms of our Impact Fees, we are still receiving fairly healthy collections. The latest numbers we had from Finance were up through September of this year, and so we are still averaging out collecting probably around $30,000 to $40,OOO,closer to about $40,000 a month in revenue, and then our interest that we've been collecting we're still getting. The Finance department is still doing a pretty good job trying to keep these funds invested, so we do get some type of return on the investment. Even though interest rates are low, they are doing their best to at least get us something out of that. As you can see from the graphic, March and April were really good months for us. We topped out at $60,000 for interest and revenue at that time, but on average it's somewhere around in the neighborhood of about $40,000 to $50,000 dollars a month. It's moving along, obviously we'd love to collect more in the fees to give us opportunities to do other things, but it's been healthy and we are able to do some of the things that we needed to do. Chair Johnson: How does this compare, Eric, to your projections that we had from the consultants? Are we kind of in line with what they were projected? I know they were based on what your land use was projected and so on and so forth. Martin: Mr. Chairman, I would need to go back and look at that a little bit for detail and to do some type of comparison there. Chief, from your perspective in terms of the projections from the consultant and everything have we been pretty close? Or have we been lagging, in terms of our fee collections? Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17. 2016 Page 13 of 28 Chief Montoya: Chairman and Eric, I think we're right on track. I know the budget for last fiscal year was like $300,000 and we went over that, and by just looking at the numbers right now it's on track to do about like we did last year. I was kind of curious about the new Impact Fees, how that would change collections, and frankly I don't see anything really more than a few gains in collections just about the same as we did last fiscal year. Chair Johnson: It's been steady? Chief Montoya: Yes, it's been steady. Chair Johnson: I should be commenting to all three of our presenters, it's just interesting to us to know what the performance is, as we are looking for the new ones. Was our consultant on board accurate, or did we have an issue? We have a growth factor 1.52% that we are projecting now, it would just be good for this Board to have an understanding that what our consultant did was great last time and how we are going forward. Martin: Mr. Chairman, what I will do for next presentation going on here in the next quarter or so is I'll add in the other things that you requested in terms of square footage for plans and some type of comparison between what was proposed by the consultant and where we are, and hopefully I will have more current information from Finance. Chair Johnson: It should be common with Parks too, right? Martin: With that, if the Board has any questions, I'll be here. Chair Johnson: Thank you. Back to our Agenda, I see that Ms. Delgado is here to continue our dialogue as it relates to Impact Fees. Delgado: Good Afternoon Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, my apologies for being late. I had a meeting with the City Manager and that took a little bit longer, so we have an issue going on that I need some assistance resolving, so that's what I was taking care of. Anyway, today we're just going to give you an update of what we did that last time we went through this process, give you some information so the next time I come back in January, we will talk about where we are at in the present day. What we are looking at and how we're going to attack that. Our Parks and Recreation Plan, we had an introduction to our plan; our changes you will see some planning process, the public outreach that was done, the Needs Assessment that was done, the implementation and priorities, Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 14 of 28 and then our next steps that will take us into the new process that we're about to start up. The Parks and Recreation Master Plan background, we have the development 5-year Plan for parks, facilities and recreation programs. The previous one was adopted in 2012. We anticipate the needs of a growing, diverse population as we go through this process. Our project objectives are to involve and engage the local residents, which we did; examine the needs for programs, facilities and funding; and establish a road map where we are going to be and which way is it going. For this next process, our completion goal is to have it done by the end of June 2017. Accomplishments since 2012: we built a splash park; we built an interactive fountain which is Downtown; acquired new acres of new park land; acquired several miles of trails; and renovated existing and built new parks. We currently have a whole lot of parks on our project list, which I know that Mr. Martin will talk about the next time we come back and he can give an overview on what's coming our way. By then we will probably have two (2) more parks probably in the books and on our radar to have maintenance on them. One for sure, possibly another, so this whole year we have been getting several new parks. We anticipate on getting more. Our issue has always been staffing and maintenance issues, which has been an ongoing issue for quite some time. Changes to consider in 2012: population growth and diversity, leaner operations which I just mentioned, and the national recession which we had gone through and hopefully we started to pick up. It looks like it started to pick up a little bit, but we are starting to spread out. Las Cruces is really starting to spread out and we are really starting to feel it on the Parks side, especially with the maintenance because we are having to go from one end of our town, all the way to the other. It takes time, resources, and again, looking for the funding mechanism for that maintenance piece. We started to think about having other satellite areas, park areas where they'll be able to pick up equipment and not have to come back to the main place and drag it all the way out, it will already be there. That's something that we will be considering in the future. Our planning process that occurred back then in 2012, we did have community engagement, we did do a needs assessment for recreation, park systems, standards in levels of service. For Capital Improvement planning, implementation and the funding and we reviewed the plans, revisions and approved those. Our public outreach, we had many open house meetings, Stakeholder discussions, a community survey was out, and there are a couple of questions I put on there for you to look at. The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board was also involved. We also had to consider the relationship to the other plans that are in existence. Not only the Parks and Recreation Plan at that time but the Comprehensive Plan, the 2010 Strategic Plan, and the Vision 2040 Plan. We're all in that process and had some different ideas that we had to consider once we went through this process back then. Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 15 of 28 Some of the key findings that happened from 2010 were walking and biking trails, and that's why we have since then added several miles of biking and walking trails, we have a whole lot more that are coming our way. Usually, when a subdivision goes in, they usually put some kind of trail around their area and nine times out of ten, it gets turned over to us and then we will start maintaining it. We do have HOA's (Home Owners Association) that have their own trails and they do maintain them but sometimes when those dissolve, people move, they no longer want to do that, it usually becomes part of our property for part of our maintenance. We also talked about small neighborhood parks, which we are starting to see in the last several years. We have quite a few up on the East Mesa side, one particular developer, that's how we got our new splash pad. We have never had one before so we developed that one, it's a in very small park. We just acquired another small pocket park, we are about to have a couple more so those seem to be what neighborhoods wanted at that time. Now I think it's probably going to stay in the same realm mostly because we don't have a lot of land, we don't have large parcels so they seem to work out. Picnic areas, shelters and shaded areas, that has come up in the last few years as well, we knew that was coming. It's hot down here, there's a lot of sunshine, so they want shade. So, those are things as we get new parks, we start looking at that. In some places we are looking at adding shade structures when we do some renovation and replacing some existing ones. Updating expanded facilities, we do have two relatively new pools. They want to expand the Aquatic Center with a very large pool, 50 meter, we will see how that one goes. Frenger is hanging on, they want us to expand and update that one but that one we are just letting hang out so we can something new to replace it. Adult Fitness and Wellness Programs, we had asked for that and since then we have added quite a few adult programs. We have added the first ever wellness program for the City of Las Cruces employees, looking to see if we can expand that in some form or fashion to the rest of the community, but that is still in its test phase with that one. Adult fitness, we added different types of programs, not just your regular sports types programs. We added kickball, we did some dodgeball, we took some different things that seem to be extremely popular. They also wanted us to enhance communication and promotional material, we revamped our entire website in the last four to five (4-5) years. We have a mascot, "Ziggy" will now have his own Facebook and Twitter page so he can get information out to the community so that way, in case it falls into one particular person when they leave, retire, what have you, Ziggy is still here and we still have him so we don't have to run the process of slowing things down. Here are some of the questions, I just added them into your packet just so you can see the types of questions that were asked to the community and the kind of results we got back. We used these, we asked them about whether the household have visited any of the City of Las Cruces Parks during the past 12 Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 16 of 28 months, which we found out they do. Whether they participated in recreation programs, I kind of asked them general questions and kinds of things they'd like to see and that's when we came up with the trails, the different adult programming, wellness and things of that nature. We asked them if they had an additional $100 where would they put them. That answer was interesting because they wanted improvements, maintenance of existing parks, pools, and recreation facilities. So, we are hoping that some of this is still standing and if we do go forward on go -bonds later down the road that would help. We did ask about the bond question, and they were in favor then, we are hoping that will still stay. Service Area Analysis, what they are looking for, we looked at pocket parks, neighborhood and communities, geographic and physical barriers, zoning and gap analysis. I believe I have put in a couple of maps that talked about these service areas and it talked about the gaps that we have. We are all aware of those gaps and it seems in the East Mesa was really huge back then, but now we seem to be getting some more parks in that area and adding some more trails trying to increase the connectivity, so that's been a somewhat of a challenge with all trails and existing ones coming in. We had to show the service gaps mostly in the East Mesa area. Obviously, we don't have any land in the Downtown area so the parks that are there we will be going to update them, maybe give them a new look here and there and do what we can. Chair Johnson: Can we take a breath here? Delgado: Yes. Chair Johnson: Even for you and for us, maybe there are questions regarding the first portion of what you'd seen because it's quite extensive. One of the questions that wanted to ask is, do we have any sense for use numbers? In particular, if there are places where you put in a new neighborhood park and there's little use, whereas there are other areas where you have a neighborhood park but it's too small for the amount of use you get? Do you have any sense for use out there? Delgado: Some of them yes, we do know that a lot of our smaller, I wouldn't even call them a neighborhood park, it's more of a pocket park. Those really don't get used a lot at all. The neighborhood parks that we do have, we have quite a few of them that get a lot of use. One of the ways we can tell is the activity, where the grass is getting worn down a lot, we have a lot of rentals in a lot of those neighborhood parks so we can get the numbers on those as well. We have a crew that does work on the weekends to go check on the parks, they can give us a visual or if we know that these parks get heavily used, we go by there more often to pick up trash, that kind of thing. We don't have any other specific mechanism that actually counts, that's about how we figure those things out. Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 17 of 28 Chair Johnson: I have had the same observation as you, and I wonder though, do we continue to invest in pocket parks? Because I see that several neighborhood parks that I've visited are highly used, well used, fun used too. I mean it's a very positive thing, but the pocket parks... Delgado: The pocket parks not so much, and it's mostly because what's coming into the neighborhood parks now are some really fun, cool things that kids like to play on because things have changed so much in the industry in the last several years. I think that may be one of the primary reasons why and if you have a large venue you can bring lots of kids or if you have a team that goes out there, you're looking at quite a few people that are going to be in attendance so they want a bigger space. Chair Johnson: Right. Delgado: The two larger parks that we have in Las Cruces which is Young's Park and Apodaca Park, they get used a lot, we have a lot of people. Would we like another large park like that? Yes, we would, but where would that go? I do not know yet. Maybe after we go through this process we will find some areas that we can look at, but we do have a lot of people coming into the town and they really do enjoy those so that's a good thing. Suttmiller: I know a new space where there's a 300 acre parcel. Delgado: Chairman, Board, yes. We have our eye on that one. Suttmiller: Mr. Chairman, I have some questions on the survey, or is somebody ahead of me? Chair Johnson: No, go ahead and then we'll go to Commissioner Beerman. Suttmiller: What kind of sample did you have for the survey? Who did the survey? Who designed the survey? Delgado: Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, I was trying to remember who did that survey but I don't remember and I know they did get a very good sample and other than trying to guess, I don't want to put out a number, but I know they did have a very good sample. We were surprised at how many were invited. Suttmiller: Your sample was structured correctly and everything? Delgado: Yes, and we did have an outside firm who did that, but we couldn't remember and I meant to ask Mr. Martin prior but I forgot. Suttmiller: I have trouble remembering my name so I don't expect for you to remember all this stuff. Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Page 18 of 28 Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Chair Johnson: Ms. Delgado, on one of the charts there is a source reference. It says Leisure Vision/ETC Institute, and these surveys were July 2011. It's not on the other charts, just on this one chart. Suttmiller: I missed that one. My next question is, was there a follow through on the people who said it was poor and fair? I've done surveys where you go in and determine who doesn't like it and who likes it, then you go back to them and say, "Okay, you liked it, why?" Delgado: Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, yes we did. We got a few of those back, they gave us a sample of the ones that really liked it, ones that really didn't like it and we really concentrated on those that did not like it to find out why. Some of the responses we received were: it's too busy, not enough lighting, they wanted bathrooms, things like that, or they wanted new and updated equipment. We are working on all of those, but we will see how it goes. Nachison: Just out of curiosity, the areas that called fair or poor, is the response from the neighborhoods with these relatively scattered around the city or are they concentrated in new parts of the city? Delgado: Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, from my recollection I want to say that they were kind of scattered throughout and they were the really small pocket parks. We have some of those in town that are just a little piece of land maybe not bigger than this room that's just grass, maybe has a bench on it. We can't really do much with something like that, but they have been there forever. Chair Johnson: There's one near my house that has very little equipment, but you have land next to it where the kids can play soccer and that's almost ongoing of the 7 to 10-year-old kids out there in the area, so because you have that extra half an acre or whatever it is, it's working for that kind of activity. But not the playground equipment, it's minimal. Delgado: Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, if there's any piece of grass out there that's big and flat, you're probably going to find a whole lot of soccer teams out there. Chair Johnson: I agree with you. Mr. Beerman? Beerman: Flatlands Park, north side of the dam, there's been a sign out there for a couple of years, I think it says x-million-dollars project. I don't know if that falls under your purview but they recently put an asphalt path, and I was just wondering what that park entails or what's going to be done there? Delgado: Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, it does fall with us and we are working with another group with that project. Yes, they just put an asphalt path and they are going to connect. We have some other paths that are coming in off of Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 19 of 28 Veteran's Park and on the other side, and we want to take that path straight across to the other end of the dam. That's a work in progress, it's going to take some time but yes, they did place that down. I do not know what the dollar amount is but I can bring that back next time. Beerman: So that was planned, besides the path. Delgado: There's going to be some other refining of the design. There's more of a natural kind of setting where you would see birds, different types of things, we'll have rabbits and things like that. We are trying to keep it as a natural setting as possible, because when it rains it raises the dam and we get a lot of flooding, and it takes out a lot of the trails that are already out there. So, we are trying to work on how we want to make that over better. That was the whole premise behind that. Chair Johnson: Very good, any further questions or shall we move on? Nachison: Move on. Chair Johnson: So the next area would be the service area analysis, is that correct? Delgado- Yes, and then that took us to the maps, these are the maps they created back then. It talks about areas that needed some service and where we had our gaps. We already knew that we had some huge issues on the East Mesa area, we didn't have a lot of recreational facilities. I believe at the time we had the recreation center which used to be for the old fire station, and then we were going to have the Sage Cafe which is right across the street, and the pool was just about to be built. That was about all that we had and that was off of Porter Road, and now we have several other parks that are out there. Our splash park is out there, we have a couple of tennis courts out there and basketball courts, things like that. It's starting to come around, mostly because of the building and the development has started up again these last couple of years. On the recreation programming slide, we looked at promoting and expanding family oriented programming. That was one of the things we think they wanted, a lot more neighborhood parks, it allows families to come within walking distance from many homes. It had enough amenities that people could do different things there, kind of meet and have a larger gathering. We are currently working on expanding our relationship with NMSU (New Mexico State University) and enhancing our programs with theirs and vice versa, and maybe utilizing some of their property but as of late, they are getting run over with soccer teams and baseball teams in their large areas. They just recently started another project and we are going to have more fields built for their intramural, so we are hoping to work with them in that area. Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 20 of 28 We are still looking at trying to put together some type of pass program that allows children better and quicker access to our programming in our facilities so we can cut down on the lines. We started a few of them with the Aquatic Center, they seem to be going well. We are now moving into the fingerprint phase so hopefully we can get people through there quicker, faster, and be able to service more. That's our goal. We are currently working on continuing our partnership with the School District, utilizing their fields and gymnasiums because we need more. We only have one gymnasium in the City of Las Cruces Parks and Recreation Department that can be used for lead games, and that is at the Meercheidt Recreation Center. It also has another smaller gym, but we can't play games in that room because there's not enough room for a table, scoreboard, or people to watch for spectators, and it's a little too short. We are hoping we can expand our programs into the Las Cruces Public Schools, and we are currently working on that and hopefully we will finally make some really good strides on that. Hopefully in the next few months we can solidify that and get programs in there. Chair Johnson: Ms. Delgado, have we ever done a look at some of the vacant industrial buildings we have out there that might be able to be converted to the gyms, basketball courts or whatever? On personal side, I'm already doing this for a gentleman who is going to bring a sports facility in town and what we looked at is, looking at specs for some of the industrial buildings, usually four (4) dollars a square foot or something that might be retrofitted for the kind of thing. We would also share our facility with you guys, but we haven't gotten that far. But there is a lot of space out there that's vacant and that might be easily renovated. Delgado: Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, we have not, but we will definitely take a look at that. Chair Johnson: Okay. Delgado: We are also looking at, we review and update our cost recovery guidelines every year to our fees and charges policy, we will be doing that again. Currently, we are obligated to recover 85% on the youth programming and 100% for adults. Aquatics we are sitting at, we are supposed to recover 33% and we hit about 26% on a good year. That's even with having everyone filled to capacity. It's difficult to raise our fees, so that makes it a little tough on that end. Aquatics again, we're still partnering, we are still trying to work with NMSU on probably providing additional swim lessons and more space since they are the only ones that have an indoor facility. We really want to try and replace the old Apodaca pool with a water park feature and we have been talking about this for several years now, and I'm thinking we might be gaining some momentum here, so hopefully we will see that happen in the next several years. Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 21 of 28 Chair Johnson: You have never had corporate sponsors for a particular area like this pool, or something like that? Delgado: Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, no. However, we are starting to have some individuals that are coming forward. We've had Pic Quik help us with a program and now they gave us some money for one of our facilities to expand to it and add, and then we had another construction company that just came forward recently to provide a stage structure, so I think they are starting to catch on to that and are getting really interested in doing stuff like that so we're hoping to pursue those. We have never done that in the past, and that's something we have been talking about, trying to figure out how can we leverage that and get people to come to us so we can do those things, that's definitely on our list of to do's and a goal. Chair Johnson. It's hard. I just sponsored an event and some of the Pic Quiks, one of them came and wanted their name on it and gave me money and I said one day is fine, but you have a different situation. Delgado: We will see if we can hopefully add another pool, another indoor pool of 50 meter over at the Aquatics Center, but that will take legislative funding and some other sources because that's not going to be something cheap. Parks and maintenance, our biggest issue there is trying to get more staff. We just received more a few more staff, but they were dedicated solely for the Downtown and now we have a plaza that has come over to Parks and we take care of the maintenance. We need a few more people so they can help us with all the new parks that are coming up on the East Mesa side for the reasons that I stated earlier. Hopefully we can continue going down that path and get a couple here and there. Also, we want to upgrade and standardize our irrigation. We have been working with Eric Martin's group, project management and not only doing the irrigation so we can save some money on the watering side, but also with the electricity and trying to change out our sporting light equipment to make it more updated. It's been there for decades, so they are up for new and improved lighting so hopefully we can get those taken care of as well and that will help us. Trails, we talked about those; we have a lot of people who love the trails; and they want more and more to expand and add connectivity, so we have been working hard with planning trying to make those things happen; but it comes down to maintenance, staff and funding. We are also looking to expand our volunteer program. Suttmiller: When they do the connectivity, do you have a plan to eventually have a continuous trail for a marathon? Delgado: For a marathon? Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 22 of 28 Suttmiller: Yes, we have some very good trails starting with the one along 1-25 and goes down, and that connects with the river trail, does it not? Delgado: Right, that comes all the way around and connects to La Llorona trail and then we stopped because we get into Mesilla; and so to get it from that point all the way back to Triviz, we would have to go through Mesilla and then all the way up University, correct? So we have to work with the county and Mesilla to finish putting in those pieces. Suttmiller: That would be very close to a protected marathon route. We could be very close to it. Delgado: The vision for that was to have it go all the way around and come back, so we are just missing that back -side piece. Suttmiller: That would be, if you have a protected marathon trail you can set up a good race that would continue and bring some money in. Delgado: Right. Suttmiller: I was under the impression from a long time ago when I was running marathons, and it's been several years, that they were eventually going to do that with the river trail and bring this one around. It's all very close to the marathon distance. You can run backwards for a couple of miles. Delgado: I think if I'm not mistaken, that trail once it's all connected, it is a little over 13 miles. I remember they talked about that they would have to do it twice. Chair Johnson: Right. Suttmiller: Yes, that's right, and again that's a very well protected trail. There's only a couple places where you're running across traffic, makes it a lot easier on the Police if you have a race. Chair Johnson: You can make them run faster. Suttmiller: There's only a couple of places where you try to get these people across without getting killed. Chair Johnson: You can make them run backwards. Suttmiller: Well, that makes it real interesting. In fact, the hospitals would end up making a lot of money from that. Chair Johnson: Okay. Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Suttmiller: I'm sorry, ma'am. Go ahead. Page 23 of 28 Delgado: That's okay. We want to expand our volunteer program. We started with the tree story program, and so we taught individuals how to plant trees and what kinds of things to look for and do some basic pruning; not only to help their trees at home, but maybe come back and help us do some planting. Since then, we have planted over 500 trees. It's been about a couple of years now, so we want to create another group, another pool of people and volunteers to help us with the entrances to parks and adding flowers in different types of ornamental types of things so we can create an inviting place into a park. That is something we are also working on. We are hoping those things will come to fruition, and help us with graffiti and things of that nature. Chair Johnson: I think that's an area that will help with communication and locations online where you can get help. I think there are a lot of people out there that would like to do this. Delgado: Right. We are hoping that we can do some training and then bring them in, and we will have a database and put them on different projects. That's our goal on that. put this in, this was the Capital Improvements Plan and the dollar amount when we did this back in 2012. 1 left it so you can kind of see when I come back in January, you will see where we are at now. That's probably going to be right around the same, maybe a little bit more, we still don't have a lot of projects out there. We are still getting new projects; I just got told about two (2) new projects today, so our list keeps growing, I don't think it gets any smaller. Things just move up in line. Again, we talked about funding, our Park Impact Fees do help us with parks and I'm working with developers who want to assist in getting those parks, done for us. Prior to the subdivision going in, that really does help so we don't have to worry about that process. When we get the volunteer program really underway, that will really help us and help offset some of the maintenance costs; and of course if we can get some local funding, be that with the GRT a little bit more and/or bonds that can help as well. Park Impact Fee Update, just as a reminder, these are one-time payments used to construct system improvements needed to accommodate our growth. They can only be used for capital improvements; we cannot use them for operating or maintenance costs. I know that was something we had talked about back in 2010 also. We periodically do update them, the last big update we did was in 2010, and current fees have been in place since 2005. Chair Johnson: The current fees were in 2005? Aren't they 2010? Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 24 of 28 Delgado: No, we had them in 2005. 1 think they were $800, $500, and then we did it again in 2010. Our proposed Impact Fees were based on actual level of service for Parks and Recreation facilities, which is what was recommended level of service from the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. I can bring those back out or I'll send you the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. It's actually a very large document. We have it on a CD so you probably need to either, I think if I'm not mistaken when we did this last time, we put them on a flash drive and we handed them to you. Unless you really want a hard copy, but it's a couple of inches thick easily. Beerman: Ms. Delgado, the developers pay Impact Fees for Parks and Recreation and then in some cases, they build parks in their own developments. The City gives them a check for that park and takes over the maintenance, if I'm understanding correctly? Delgado: Right, we reimburse them. Beerman: How is the value of that park that the City writes the check for, how is that determined? Delgado: Based on the number of homes in that area that we have already, and Mr. Martin can correct me if I step sideways, it's based on the number of homes that are in that particular subdivision that the developer is working on, and once they reach a certain amount it triggers all of the Park Impact Fees. We sit down with them, they don't get the whole amount, let's say it was $9, they don't get the whole amount. We sit down and say okay, we want a park that's going to be this big; we talk about the size, we negotiate where it's at in relation to their development and then we sit down and say these are the types of amenities we want to look at and this is what we want to happen. We kind of give them a list prior to putting that all together. Beerman: So, they get all the Impact Fees back, based on how many properties are served by how many permits there were in that park area? Delgado: They don't get all the Impact Fees back, it would just be an associated portion. Beerman: But what if the park costs $100,000? Do they get back $100,000, or do they get back more or less? Does anybody really audit how much that park is worth before the City writes a check? Delgado: Yes, prior to that we have an agreement with them; a contract that spells out the size, the place, and the amenities that will be there, and the dollar amount that we will pay up to. Beerman: That's just a negotiated amount? Not really a single source? Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 25 of 28 Delgado: Right, because it will be the developer that builds it for us. After it's built, then they will turn it over to us after we check everything. Martin: Mr. Chairman, Board members, as part of that negotiation we normally go to City Council because we put some type of reimbursement agreement together. Given our experience with Parks and Recreation and the fact that we have gone in and built parks and what have you, we've got a pretty good idea of what the value of recreational equipment is. The flat work, all of the material that goes with it, we know what the value of the acreage is that's being transferred back to us. Staff does look at that pretty close in conjunction with Parks and Recreation in terms on establishing a level of amenities of what we are doing, and then the reimbursement amount Sonya was talking about is a not to exceed, so it's up to. They may have collected $200,000 or $300,000 in that area, but if they only want to build one park and that one park has $100,000 worth of amenities, we know we are not going to exceed that; and because all the park fees come into just one general part of funds called Park Manager General, then that does leave those collected fees available for other under - served areas that meets the spirit and intent of the Impact Fee to where we can provide those other improvements elsewhere in the City which is what we have done in the past. Beerman: Thank you. Delgado: Our fee is based on population, facility demand and cost, this is the formula that the consultant had worked with us at Tischler Bise, so I wanted to leave that on there and that's why they use that for when we did it in 2010. Chair Johnson: This is the report from 2010? Delgado: Yes, this is just the history and what we did last time. We haven't started that process yet, we are just about to. So again, this is information that was developed in 2010, the last time we went forward. Our proposed fees are set to help meet the current level of service, so once we start this process we will see where we are at based on the fee, based on our level of service, and we will come back and we will review that as well; but again, this is from 2010. The next steps that happen with us now that we're about to review these as we will be updating the Parks & Recreation Master Plan, we will be using Land Use Assumptions that were just adopted, and then we will also be looking at the Park Impact Fee. In June 2017, we hope to have City Council adopt it. It will come here to CIAC, and it will also go to the Parks and Recreation Board. Chair Johnson: In January will be the first time we get to see the updated Master Plan and the proposed Impact Fees? Delgado: In January, we will bring back to you where we are at right now, what it looks like, and what the Parks and Recreation Master Plan looks like right now. I think Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 26 of 28 just last week I got an email stating that we will be putting it out to bid to have the company come back in, and it looks like it might be Tischler Bise again. We will come back through and go back through that whole process, because it's going to review and update. Chair Johnson: So, we are going to have a short window from January to June because we probably have to approve the impact fees in May? Delgado: Probably. Chair Johnson. Maybe April even? We only have a short period of time. Delgado: This one we did in 2010 was very extensive; this next one, we don't see us doing that, but we will be talking with them come January. Chair Johnson: Can I ask you a side question? Do you ever share your wonderful knowledge with other adjacent municipalities who may want to build facilities but that may not have the depth that the Park District has? Delgado: Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, we have a lot of communities that are close to us that will help and say, "How did you do this, is that yours, or do you have any place I can go to get additional information?". We're always willing to help, definitely. Chair Johnson: I'd like to talk to you about that later. Delgado: Okay. A basic overview of what happened in 2010, so all that information again is 2010 but it's very extensive. We don't seem to be going that route this next time around, but I should have more information being in January, after the holidays. Chair Johnson: We were there, weren't we? Suttmiller: We were, yes. My take in this is there hasn't been much change. Delgado: The fee currently that's coming in seems to be working. Mr. Martin can attest to that as well, or if he has any other comments, but it seems to be working really well. We are able get more projects done. Our list is growing, but we are able to kind of get them off the list, which means just making room for new ones but it seems to be working very well. We are not having issues on that end. Even though I still need the maintenance staff it's not going faster, it's still creeping up on us, but we are hoping we can put some things into place that will help us. Suttmiller: I can remember discussing that back in 2010. Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 27 of 28 Delgado: Right, and back then we did lose a lot of positions because of the recession and budget cuts so we are trying to slowly get some of those back, but that will be a process. Suttmiller: My take on that, and I have no control of course, is if you can't maintain them you shouldn't be building them. Yes, it's really nice to build them but then to let them sit out there and rot... Chair Johnson: Remember what our role is. Suttmiller: Yes, I know, I am talking as a citizen. I said I know I have no say in it. Martin: Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, as far as what Ms. Delgado is saying, the new level of fees that was adopted has worked much better for us and it's given us the latitude to actually, instead of phasing certain projects, we have actually been able to take them to completion versus saying, "Okay, we have a little bit here and a little bit there," and wait for collections to catch up. So, the higher rates have worked really well for us, I understand your concern, why should we continue building more, but as long as Park Impact Fees are in place we basically have a seven-year window. If we don't get it paid out in that seven years, we have to start refunding money and the direction, of course, we have from City Management is we don't refund money. Suttmiller: I wouldn't refund it either, I understand that maintenance is another issue, but it's an issue of why build something that you can't maintain? Martin: Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, part of what we are trying to do, and this goes a little bit beyond on what we are doing here, but Ms. Delgado has alluded to working with our Design and Construction Services Division, our Sustainability Office as we look at those kinds of things whether it's xeriscaping, changes in watering systems, all those kinds of things. We are looking at all those because if we can find efficiencies in one area, that maybe will free up the resources in staff to help take care of the some of the maintenance activities in a different area because we we're more efficient over here. We're doing the same thing at our building site as well. That helps address the issue that you're raising, as we build these parks, can we maintain them. We are trying to do other things in the background by working together to find ways to stretch those resources to make it work. Suttmiller: Okay. Chair Johnson: Ms. Delgado, I think we all know that the City Council has to be thanked because this Board recommended one Impact Fee, and the City Council looked at it and said, "We are going to double that." The wisdom of this Board only went so far, the City Council is the one to thank for the fact they actually Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Regular Meeting Minutes for November 17, 2016 Page 28 of 28 increased those fees, so I thank you for your presentation. Let's go to our next agenda item, that would be the next meeting date. 5. Next Meeting Date: Chair Johnson: If you will note, we have nothing scheduled and as such I would need a recommendation, a motion that we cancel our December meeting because there is no business before us. Suttmiller: So moved. Nachison: Second. Chair Johnson: We have a motion and a second. All those in favor? Aye. Suttmiller: Aye. Nachison: Aye. Lujan: Aye. The motion was approved unanimously 5-0. Chair Johnson: The next time we will see each other will be on January 19, 2017 and a presentation will be from Ms. Delgado who I wish to speak to before she leaves, and also Parks and Recreation's Current Projects. I thank you all, and I wish you a Happy Thanksgiving and great holidays. 6. Public Participation: There was none. 7. Committee General Discussion: Chair Johnson: Board comments? None. Suttmiller: None. 8. Adjournment. Meeting was adjourned at approximately 2:48 p.m.