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10-20-15MESILLA VALLEY METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES ADVISORY COMMITTEE 4 The following are minutes for the meeting of the Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities 5 Advisory Committee of the Mesilla Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) 6 which was held October 20, 2015 at 5:00 p.m. in Commission Chambers at Dona Ana 7 County Government Building, 845 Motel Blvd., Las Cruces, New Mexico. 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 MEMBERS PRESENT: George Pearson, Chair (City of Las Cruces Citizen Rep) James Nunez (City of Las Cruces Rep) Jolene Herrera (NMDOT Rep) David Shearer (NMSU Rep) Mark Leisher (DAC Citizen Rep) (departed 6:15) Ashleigh Curry (Town of Mesilla Citizen Rep) Andrew Bencomo (Ped. Community Rep) (departed 6:21) Lance Shepan (Mesilla Marshall's Rep) Gabriel Rochelle (Bicycle Community Rep) (departed 6:26) MEMBERS ABSENT: Duane Bentley (Bicycle Community Rep) Albert Casillas (DAC Rep) STAFF PRESENT: Tom Murphy (MPO) Michael McAdams (MPO) OTHERS PRESENT: Jaime Lakey (NMSU - Proxy) Andy Hume, Downtown Coordinator Brian Byrd, CLC Planner Kan Bachman, Dona Ana Place Matters Armando Morales, CLC Planner Elizabeth Gill, NMSU Marcia Davis Samuel Paz, DAC Becky Baum, Recording Secretary, RC Creations, LLC 1. CALL TO ORDER (5:04 p.m.) Pearson: Five p.m. Tuesday, October 20th. Call to order the Mesilla Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization Bicycle and Pedestrians Facility Advisory Committee. 2. APPROVAL OF AGENDA Pearson: First order of business would be approval of the agenda. Are there any comments or additions/deletions for our agenda? Hearing none I'll hear a motion to accept the agenda as presented. Shearer: I'll move to accept the agenda as presented. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 Nunez: I'll second. Pearson: Okay. We have a motion and a second. All in favor, "aye." MOTION PASSES UNANIMOUSLY. Pearson: Any opposed? 3. APPROVAL OF MINUTES 3.1 August 18, 2015 Pearson: Next order of business is approval of the minutes. We have any comments on the minutes? Nunez: I got a couple. On page 20, line 10 it reads "and the Elks Drive is in construction," should read "and the Elks Drive reconstruction." And then on line 13 it reads "then the bid it," should be "then the bid items." Pearson: Okay. Anyone else? Okay. I noticed on our Members Absent we had Ashleigh Curry but she was represented by Jamie Lakey as a proxy so it's probably appropriate that, to strike Ashleigh's Member Absent since she wasn't actually absent, she was, she wasn't physically here but she was represented. Okay. Any other comments? So I'll accept a motion to accept the minutes as modified. Rochelle: So moved. Pearson: And that's Gabriel. And a second? Herrera: I second. Pearson: We have a motion and a second to approve the minutes of August 18th as amended. All in favor "aye." MOTION PASSES UNANIMOUSLY. Pearson: Any opposed? So that passes. 4. PUBLIC COMMENT Pearson: Next item is Public Comment. Do we have any member of the public that wishes to give us any comments at this point? 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Leisher: Mr. Chair. Before we start, I just want to note that I need to leave at 6:15 this evening. Pearson: Okay. Hearing no public comment. 5. ACTION ITEMS 5.1 University Avenue Study Corridor Project Pearson: We'll move on to, it's listed as an action item. University Avenue Study Corridor Project. McAdams: Okay. I'll take this one Mr. Chairman. Let me, and this is, many of you already familiar with this already. Pearson: Oh, let me interrupt you. McAdams: Okay. Pearson: I skipped over something. We should have introductions of the panel... McAdams: Oh, yeah. That's good. Pearson: Cause we do have a new member. McAdams: Okay. Pearson: I should've done that during the call to order probably so if we can just go through, Mark if you can start, introduce yourself. Leisher: Mark Leisher, Dona Ana County Citizens Representative. Herrera: Jolene Herrera, NMDOT Representative. Shepan: Lance Shepan, Mesilla Marshalls Representative. Curry: Ashleigh Curry, Town of Mesilla Representative. Rochelle: Gabriel Rochelle, At -Large Representative. Curry: Sorry, I want to add Citizen Representative, Town of Mesilla. Nunez: James Nunez, City of Las Cruces. Bencomo: Andrew Bencomo, Pedestrian Citizen Representative. 3 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Shearer: David Shearer, NMSU's Representative. Pearson: And I'm George Pearson, City of Las Cruces Citizen Representative. And Gabriel is the Bicycle Community Representative. Okay. Sorry to interrupt you but that's, go ahead. McAdams: No problem. No problem. Thank you Mr. Chair. Michael McAdams gave his presentation. Leisher: Mr. Chair. I have a question. With regard to Section F, which side is the multiuse path planned for, south or north side? Oh, okay. McAdams: I guess Mr. Chair. I'm not sure. That's, I guess the south side you know. The multiuse path will be going, yeah the south side on, if you go, I think it says you go, Mr. Chair as you go on the, down the facility. Leisher: Okay. Thank you. McAdams: Okay. Pearson: So perhaps if they cover the EBID the multiuse would be a, on the EBID channel, is that ... McAdams: I think that's ... Pearson: What they're thinking there? McAdams: You know this is a planning study. It's a, I, 1 think that was a, the, one of the suppositions if you, if the, EBID would, would allow for that, the bikeway to go over the top of the, of the channel. Yes. So I think partially that is, the multiuse path is partially related to the EBID getting permission to put that, the, the multiuse path over the, over the channel. Murphy: Michael if I may, and Mr. Chair. Also I, 1 think that that, you know that (inaudible) will be studied more in the Phase B aspect where more cost considerations can be looked at, more in engineering factors. So I, I, 1 think it really hasn't been set. I, you know but, but ... Pearson: So we're at much more of a planning stage here then. Murphy: Right. We're, yeah it's the early, early planning stages. Pearson: I think we want this, we want to make sure we could have it, will happen in the later stages. 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Murphy: Right. But we'll, but do retain some flexibility moving forward. Thank you. McAdams: Thank you too Tom. Michael McAdams continued his presentation. Herrera: Mr. Chair. Can I interrupt you Michael really quick? So you're talking here, a reduced typical section may still need right-of-way, which typical section? For either one of those options? McAdams: Good question. Mr. Chair. I think that, can I address a point. Pearson: Yes. McAdams: Ms. Herrera's point. I think that, that this course is still in the planning stage. The narrower sections are near Avenida de Mesilla. There've been 40 feet okay right-of-way and (inaudible) the other section close to 100. So if you get nearer South Main you have much more right-of-way and but you get nearer Mesilla there's much more limited. So I think they're talking bout at the lower end near Avenida de Mesilla you may require some additional right-of-way because the right-of-way's very narrow at that point. So ... Herrera: Right and so I guess that would really mean for either of the typical sections that area would require ... McAdams: I ... Herrera: Right-of-way takes. McAdams: Yeah. I think that's what it means. I think that you can see that I think well we can go ... Murphy: Michael if, Michael if I may. Yes that's correct. The right-of-way goes under 40 feet in some areas so either cross-section would require right-of- way purchase. Herrera: And so is that what the red means here then is that for either one of the cross -sections those are the areas that would require right-of-way? Murphy: That is correct. Herrera: Okay. Thank you. Michael McAdams continued his presentation. 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Bencomo: Mr. Chair. I have a couple of questions that, if we can bring the presentation back, if we do that. McAdams: Okay. Let me bring it back. Bencomo: So can we go back to that one there, the right-of-way look. McAdams: This one right here? Bencomo: No, where it shows the red and the green and ... McAdams: Okay. Bencomo: The possible right-of-way. McAdams: Okay. Bencomo: So, cause I was looking at the mapping that you had for the possible use of EBID laterals for, which is I think the next slide after this one. McAdams: I, okay Bencomo: But I was wondering if maybe by utilizing that and cutting off on the ditch, see where it goes down University and goes to the right if that would alleviate having to get that right-of-way cause you could reduce at that point and the multiuse would go a different direction but it looks like it's beyond that point if you skip back to one more ... McAdams: Okay. Bencomo: Slide, that one, it looks like it's, the right-of-ways before that happens perhaps. McAdams: There are EBID. Mr. Chairman. Like to dress more there, EBID right-of- way on the road itself, near the road. So along parallel to a portion of University it's, goes on the right-hand side ... Bencomo: Right. McAdams: Are going east, is on the east side of the road. Bencomo: Correct. I guess I was looking at the ... McAdams: Right. Bencomo: Section, the red section closer to Avenida de Mesilla. 6 5 6 7 R 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 McAdams: Right. Bencomo: If, if the ditch cut off sooner than that and we're able to utilize that side route then you wouldn't need that right-of-way there but it's, it's after that so it's a moot point. My question's moot. McAdams: Yeah, okay. Bencomo: And also, or the second question I had was is EBID already been contacted about this? How do they feel about giving up that right-of-way or allowing use of that? McAdams: Mr. Chairman. I, 1 can address this. Pearson: Yes. McAdams: EBID at the last, when we had the public hearing was there and they are apparently, they think it's a positive move because what will happen, it'll eliminate them having to, to, to actually mow the grass and also means it will be a covered ditch. So they're actually in favor of this. It'll be less maintenance for them. So I think that, I received a very positive, what I receive a positive response from EBID or I sense a, a positive response. Bencomo: Okay. And along those same lines the property owners in, farther up? I'm guessing those are private property owners of the right-of-way and have, did they come to the meetings to discuss, and I apologize for not making the meeting ... McAdams: No, no. Bencomo: In Mesilla last week. McAdams: They, there were about 30 people represented at the last public hearing and I assume that, I'm not really sure, I assume that most were, were adjacent property or a good bit of them were. But I can't be, I can't be absolutely sure. Bencomo: Okay. McAdams: But the one before the, the first public hearing majority of people were, were, were nearby residents you know. So I, 1 gather through the meeting that most of them were, had direct interest because their property were nearby. They, and what, the rest were course I think were Village of, of Mesilla residents as well. Bencomo: Thank you. I Herrera: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Mr. Chair. I just wanted to add some to your questions. NMDOT has a meeting with EBID next week I think. No, the week after on November 2nd and to specifically talk about the use of this right-of-way. One thing to clarify is that if we did use the EBID right-of-way it wouldn't necessarily be a take. It would be more of probably an agreement between the two so although there's a cost with putting the, the ditch underground I don't think that we would have to pay for the right-of-way in that location which I think was going to, to your point to try to cut the costs. And typically the property owners aren't contacted until we get more into the design phase and know exactly what the footprint of the project is going to look like so those property owners haven't been formally contacted at all. Bencomo: Correct. I was just wondering if they had actually come out to the meeting and said, "Hey that's my property there," and had any concerns about that but thank you. Herrera: Thanks Mr. Chair. Pearson: Any other ... Shepan: Mr. Chair. The green area in front of Zia on the two options that they're looking at ... Baum: Your microphone isn't on, please. Pearson: The green button. Shepan: It was on. There we go. Sorry about that. The green area in front of Zia, right now there's a turn lane in there. On the two options is that staying or is that being absorbed? Herrera: That would stay. So those typical sections are for the majority of the roadway but we would definitely keep the turn lane at that section. It's a little bit wider there so ... Shepan: Okay. Thank you. Pearson: Any other Committee Member comments? Herrera: Mr. Chair. Pearson: Yes. Herrera: Of course I'm a little biased but I prefer Section G just because I think it fits the roadway better and with the other one I'm worried that there's going to be so much, either so much right-of-way needed or we're going to have to 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 squeeze it down so it's not going to be consistent through, through the entire stretch of road. Pearson: I think that would be my only concern with F, is we, we couldn't do the whole corridor with F so I think G is ... Bencomo: Yeah and I'd recommend additional ... Pearson: (inaudible) because of that. Tom. Murphy: Yes Mr. Chair. What staff is going to be, is what our, our request here is for a recommendation to the Policy Committee. We're asking that you recommend that we advance both alternatives to the Phase B so that we can do further study on it. There's, you know there's some, obviously the, you know the smaller section's going to be, would be easier to implement. It'd be less expensive but I think there are interests out there that would, would like to say, "Hey what, you know what does the other one cost and is it going to be worth it to us?" So staff would like to have both of those recommended for advancement to the Phase B study. Pearson: Yeah. And in that study we can, we'd figure out that all we could do maybe a mile with the wider, with multiuse path and then ... Murphy: That, that's correct. Pearson: Take the, the piece that makes sense connecting neighborhoods maybe. Murphy: That, that's correct. So we'd like, we'd like both sections to be advanced. Pearson: Okay. Curry: And Mr. Chair. I think, personally I prefer Section F. I know it does take more right-of-way but I think with consideration of elementary school and middle schools both nearby, Mesilla Park, Mesilla, and Zia that are all commutable by bicycle from a perspective of children using that I would be more comfortable promoting a multiuse trail for children's to be, for children to be able to bike on. And also confident cyclists in the bike lane is great but when you have more vulnerable users such as children I would recommend Section F personally so I would, I would be in favor of advancing both, both typical sections for further study. Pearson: The other question I have, we have the multiuse path map, mapping and I believe the idea, we tend to include that as part of this planning phase right, just as a, something to consider, or tell me how that fits into things and then maybe I'll comment on it. Or I'm making, presume, because we've got the, the perimeter trail around the city from the La Llorona outfall 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 channel, Triviz, and the last leg currently is identified as down University and there's a certain part of that that really doesn't make sense. We've seen, we've just talked about the part of this that doesn't make sense for a multiuse trail. Murphy: Mr. Chair. Yes that's correct. I think though, though that, that multiuse trail discussion's going to be much in depth whether, whether you know a multiuse path happens on this facility or not so I think when, as Ms. you know Ms. Curry pointed out they, there's going, you know there's you know certain needs probably closer to the school you know and the, further east where there's you know plentiful right-of-ways, get closer to the railroad tracks, probably want to, you know we can implement portions of that, of the Section F at that point and then maybe you know maybe ultimately long-term someday we'd do put that part of the loop, the loop around the city. But I think we, we have a map and we'll have the discussion of are there other ways that we could ... Pearson: Right Murphy: Achieve that goal as well but not allow that discussion to, to hold up this process. Pearson: Right cause potentially we'll have the Triviz underneath University project at some point in the future and that makes sense that the trail then connects out to where one of those outer loops on this map comes through and ... Murphy: Right. So there's, there's a lot of things to look at when we get to that discussion so it could be at some point where you know if, if there's ever multiuse on University that would just be in addition to, to a loop that's created but you know we'd like, like to get a recommendation on, on these alternate, you know these two alternatives to be included into the report. Pearson: But that part of the report will be part of the report. So that's, so ... Bencomo: Mr. Chair. Just one more comment. I, I, 1 have to agree with the, the thought process of having a multiuse trail on there and, and I'm saying this understanding that there's only so much space to put all this in as I, I, 1 understand the, the point of squeezing things in and doing stuff like that but I think that those multiuse paths seem to draw people out more than sidewalks do. There's sidewalks all over the place and we don't see people out there walking all the time but you see them on Triviz. You see them on the, the outfall. You see them on La Llorona. That type of path seems to draw people out and I think that's what we need to focus on is, is those looping systems, those connectivity and those designated paths that people look at and feel like, "That's what it's for and that's what I'm going 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 there for and I feel safe there doing that." So as much as possible keeping those in but I do understand logistically that just may not always work. So thank you. Leisher: Mr. Chair. Does anybody know if there's any anticipated need to put more southbound access to the neighborhoods in there? What I'm thinking of is if a multiuse path system does go in there, will that mean that some of these residential areas will want direct access to University from their neighborhood because the, the everything has changed, it's gone from a covered ditch to a multiuse path? Pearson: I hadn't heard any discussion like that. There's still only limited cross - streets though I think. Leisher: Yeah. Pearson: The cross -streets where the entrances to the neighborhoods are. Leisher: I think there's ... Pearson: I don't think there's any, I don't think it's possible to add another cross - street cause there's private property right along the back, the end of the EBID. Leisher: Okay. Pearson: Every place there's not a street there's private property on the other side of that ditch. Leisher: Every place that's not already a street, right. Pearson: Yeah. Leisher: Yeah. Pearson: So like to hear a motion to forward both alternatives Curry: I make a motion to put forth both Typical Section F and G. Leisher: I second that motion. Pearson: I have a motion and a second. All in favor, "aye." MOTION PASSES UNANIMOUSLY. Pearson: Any opposed? That passes. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 6. DISCUSSION ITEMS 6.1 Alameda Boulevard Restriping Project Pearson: We're on to our next item, Discussion Item 6.1: Alameda Boulevard Restriping Project. Murphy: Mr. Chair. Mr. Chair, Members of the Committee. We originally. I'm getting picked up? Okay I'm on. It doesn't sound, sounds different from down there. We had originally had this on the agenda, the Transportation Department was going to, was restriping Alameda and they, they, they requested to be before this Committee that, but they wanted to move quicker than the schedule allowed so as you're aware we did send out a e- mail with some of the proposals that, that they were looking at and got the response back. They also held a public meeting. They since decided that they're going to reinstall the bike lanes on Alameda and so they felt that they didn't really need to see a need to come, come to this Committee to give a presentation on why bike lanes should be removed since they were keeping them in. That said I've had, had a discussion with Gary Skelton from Transportation Department earlier this afternoon to get, get kind of more details. At the Safe Routes to School meeting this morning some concern was raised about the bicycle lanes not being wide enough and perhaps could, could they get, get widened and it appeared from the, the taping down on the roadway that the lanes were going to be, the lane itself wasn't going to be any wider. According to Mr. Skelton they are going, they are going to be putting in buffered bike lanes along that section so we'll have that, that one, that one lane will be kind, the same, the same, tightness but then there'll be a two and a half -foot buffer strip through most of the corridor on that and they're still working to get that approved through David Maestas, the Transportation Director. Pearson: Okay. Murphy: But that's the direction that they want to, they want to proceed in and I'll answer any questions I may be able to. Pearson: Do you know what the lane width of the main line is planned to be? Murphy: I think he, he said it would be, they were trying to get it down to, to 12 feet or 11 to 12 feet. Pearson: Okay. Yeah, it'll be 12 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 Murphy: They're with, their, their chief goal on that is, are to, you know is to reduce the speeds in the corridor. Pearson: Right. Of course the ten -foot lane width in the urban area probably be appropriate but I, they've, I'd attended the public meeting and they were expressing some concerns about fire trucks being able to go down which, if it's a buffered bike lane there's plenty of room for a large vehicle to actually, especially emergency equipment. Any discussion about how they're going to handle the intersection by Picacho? Cause that's a, like there's a lot of discussion at the public meeting about that. Murphy: No. He discussed mainly I, I, there's going to be, I guess there's going to be portions as it approaches Hoagland that, that the lane's going to have to go away and go to a Share the Road facility. That seemed to be his main, his main concern with, in my discussion with him. Pearson: Yeah. Murphy: I don't recall what he said concerning the area near Picacho. Pearson: Yeah that's, part of our mandate is, is a public information conduit so that not only do we receive information but the public receives information that we receive so I guess I want to express disappointment that the Transportation Department couldn't come here to answer these questions. At the intersections it makes sense that the, the bike lanes disappear because then you just, the bicycles become traffic and so they work their way through the intersection so that's, in my mind that's not as much of a concern as what happens at Picacho where there's no definition of, right now there's no definition of where traffic belongs and cars will turn that into three -car -wide, they'll make an impromptu right -turn -only lane when there's, it's not marked as a right -turn -only lane. It's marked as a straight through and right turn. But you'll have the straight through traffic and the right turn lane activity there so that's, that's why that discussion, finding out what they're doing there would've been helpful. Any other Committee Members have comments? Nunez: I'll just say that I did look at the striping there that's currently there and your comments make sense. It's, so the, I don't know what a possible solution could be, maybe some dashed lines or, or some other what do you call it, signage or, but if we have suggestions we could maybe take them to him. Maybe we can think about it for a month or so and then ... Pearson: Well it'll be done by then. 13 I Nunez: Right but that doesn't mean that there can't be additional striping or 2 signing that can be added is my point. Cause it sounds as though it's all 3 going to stay like it is. Correct? Am I right Mr. Murphy? 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Murphy: That's, that's the impression I, well with the addition of the, the buffered, buffered lanes and quite frankly I, I, 1 didn't think to ask Mr. Skelton specifically on approaching Picacho. I, the, Mr. Wray was at the public meeting rather than myself and, although I heard, heard the two of you discussing it when I was talking to Mr. Skelton it, it did slip my mind as being one of the primary concerns. But I will make a note. I'll, I'll give him a call in the morning. Pearson: Good. Murphy: And then I'll, I'll send an e-mail what, to the Committee to let you know ... Pearson: Yeah. The other question ... Murphy: What that answer is. Pearson: I think that we had, currently there were no bike lanes in front of Alameda Elementary and if they were going to actually add the bike lanes there, is, extend the bike lanes all the way through the corridor from whatever it is, from Palmer to Three Crosses or Picacho, wherever they pick it up? Murphy: I'll follow up on that as well. Pearson: So that was a question that they could've answered if they were here. Any other Committee Member Comments? 6.2 NMSU Bicycle Share Program Presentation Pearson: Okay. We'll go on to our next item: NMSU Bicycle Share Program Presentation. Shearer: Okay. So, I'm sorry this is Jamie Lakey so your name isn't on the sheet and my name's David Shearer so Jamie's going to make a presentation on the Bike Share Rental Program that so far at NMSU. So basically there's been some discussion and review on this going back some two years now on just looking at bike shares or bike rentals, whatever you want to call them for the university, what you, what should we ask for or what, you know how should it be designed and what are some of the companies and what would be some of the cost and so she's going to make it a slide presentation on, on this and there's some additional information available if, if you're interested, we've done a working paper. I'm sorry I guess, is that it? 14 I Lakey: That's what he said. Okay. 2 3 Shearer: Okay. All right. Thank you. 4 5 Lakey: Okay. So I have been working on this for a while. I have, I have lots of ... 6 7 Pearson: You need to move the microphone down. 8 9 Lakey: Oh. Okay. I'm (inaudible) with bicycle safety and stuff on campus. I do a 10 lot of cycling so. So does everybody know what a, a bike share program 11 is here? No? 12 13 Pearson: You should tell us anyways. 14 15 Shearer: Yeah. Go ahead and define it please. 16 17 Jamie Lakey gave her presentation. 18 19 Shearer: I believe we provided Tom Murphy a copy of this. 20 21 Lakey: Yes. 22 23 Shearer: He's walked out. 24 25 Jamie Lakey continued her presentation. 26 27 Shearer: Get, get to the nitty-gritty of the, the faster. 28 29 Jamie Lakey continued her presentation. 30 31 Shearer: Sixty, $600,000, yes. Sorry. 32 33 Jamie Lakey continued her presentation. 34 35 Pearson: So I have a question for you. Are the, there examples of these two 36 systems in other places? 37 38 Lakey: There are. Wait, yes. 39 40 Jamie Lakey continued her presentation. 41 42 Shearer: The Collegiate Bicycle Company in San Diego if I recall. 43 44 Lakey: Yes. So if you're in San Diego you should check it out. And Denver. If 45 you've been to Denver you've definitely seen this, the system they have 46 there. They're amazing over there. 15 I Curry: What are the pros and cons other than financial for Collegiate versus 2 Zagster? 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Lakey: Okay so Zagster has a lot more technology and, and both, and all of the bike companies that we talked with they are upgrading and every, every day they're probably increasing with their technology and everything else so by the time we actually get it approved they'll probably, each company might be more competitive with each other. But with Collegiate bike they don't do as much as Zagster. So Zagster has 24-hour service. If something happens to one of the bikes or something there's a number that people can call. They come in every two weeks and they'll do repairs and all that stuff on the bikes and they, if I read correctly I got a e-mail the other day where they just uploaded their data for the bikes because they, each company has a data system to where it shows you where the bikes are generally used and where they're dropped off so that you know where you need more bikes and less bikes. So they just uploaded to the Cloud so now you can access it in the Cloud instead of the other way that you would access it. So Zagster has a lot. They offer a lot. They're just expensive. Especially for the university. Did that answer your question? Curry: Yeah, thank you. Pearson: So you could take out your smart phone and say, "I'm within five blocks of some station," and say, "Do you have a bike there for me so I start walking over there?" Lakey: With, we, yes. With, with Zagster you can take out your phone and you can, it'll tell you which stations are close to you and which one has a bike and which ones, so if you're riding, if you're riding one of the bikes and you're coming up to a station it'll tell you if it's full or not. Which you shouldn't be on your phone and riding the bike but you know what I mean. It'll let you know the closest location that you can drop off a bike if one is over -full. Jamie Lakey continued her presentation. Curry: If I could ask a quick question. What about visiting people visiting to the university and then they don't have a, a card. Are they eligible to be able to use the program? Lakey: Yeah. They can swipe their credit card and be able to use the bike during the time that they're there. Jamie Lakey continued her presentation. Curry: Jamie sorry again. What is ASNMSU, what is that? 16 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Lakey: Oh, that's ... Shearer: Associated, or Associated Students of NMSU. Lakey: Yeah. It's the student government that we have. Curry: Thank you. Jamie Lakey continued her presentation. Bencomo: Mr. Chair. I got a series of questions so ... Lakey: Go ahead. Ask. Bencomo: So I know you had some websites up there, so some examples of other universities perhaps using this? Lakey: If you, yeah. If you go to these websites it'll take you to different links for different universities ... Bencomo: Right. Lakey: Who're using these companies? Bencomo: Right. Lakey: So that you can see how they're using them. Bencomo: Correct, so ... Lakey: And, and cities. It's not just universities. Bencomo: Okay. So my question is have you actually looked at those and, cause NMSU's pretty compact and for a city to do it is a little different, longer distances. Is that, does that work well for other places that are compact like NMS, I know I can go look at the websites but I'm here, right here so I'm going to ask it. Lakey: It actually works really good because the, in Denver, the university there they also they have, they have bike share and then the city also has bike share. Bencomo: Okay. So there's enough interest. Were the students polled too? Lakey: Yeah. 17 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Bencomo: For that interest cause some of this is going to have to be, the fees are going to be made up by student use and things like that. Lakey: Right. So right now there is actually a survey going around the university for NMSU asking students if they support a bike share, if they would use it, if they're willing for the fee to be increased for it. Bencomo: Okay. And are there any cost breaks like if you, because you're, you show 100 bikes on there. If you did 200 bikes is there a ... Lakey: So if ... Bencomo: Reduced cost for those or how does that work? Lakey: With, with the more bikes you get the less the bikes cost. Shearer: Per bike? Lakey: Per bike. Bencomo: Oh, per, for the user. But not the overall startup costs. Shearer: For the overall... Lakey: No, no, no, no. For the startup costs, so if, if the university and the city collaborated it would cost, together it would cost us less than what it would cost for us to do it separately. Bencomo: So you're saying it's, it's the same startup cost but because there's more bikes it's less per bike, is that correct? Am I understanding that correctly? Lakey: No, I ... Bencomo: Okay. How is it less then? Lakey: It's, it's, so each company they wouldn't give an exact amount so I gave them, I was like, "How much would it be for 100 bikes, or how much would it be for 120 bikes?" So one company said $700 per bike but they said that the more bikes you get the less the price for the bikes are. That's how they explained it. Bencomo: Okay. Pearson: But then the docking station must have a price too. Lakey: Yeah. The docking stations have prices as well. Yeah. 18 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Bencomo: It seems like the, the more bikes you have the more cost-effective it would be and cheaper it's be. Lakey: Yes. The more, yes. Shearer: Yeah. Lakey: The cheaper it'll cost the ... Bencomo: So ... Lakey: The people purchasing it. Shearer: For the bikes but then you got higher maintenance costs because you got to take care of more bikes and you got, yeah, and you got to bring ... Lakey: Yeah. Shearer: Bikes Around. One of the groups we looked at were relatively inexpensive. The problem with it was that if you checked it out at this kiosk you had to bring it back to this kiosk and so that didn't work out as, as being a possibility. Lakey: Yeah. That was On Bike. So On Bike is an amazing company. They're just, they're real primitive with what they have but it was, you had to return it where you picked it up from and at the university I don't see people returning the bikes, even in the city I don't see people returning the bikes where we get it from. Bencomo: So and, and I apologize for the, the map of Albuquerque, I didn't look at it real quickly when you had it up there. Was that just NMS, or UNM or was that the city? Lakey: No. UNM ... Shearer: No, that was the city. Lakey: Doesn't have very good bike paths. Shearer: That was the city. (Inaudible) Bencomo: So it's the city. Okay so the city is doing it then. Lakey: Yeah, the city has an amazing bike path. Bencomo: Okay. So which kind of leads me to a, now a comment not necessarily a question is I like the concept. I really do. I think it's great and I, 1 think it's 19 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 great more in terms of what the future could bring if, if the city were to get involved and to start incrementally maybe in phases around the university, "Okay, we're going to put a bike station .... Lakey: Yeah. Bencomo: ..out here now and then out here and then test it out," and then as we move along if it's effective then to start to spread that through the city rather than all one fell swoop. Lakey: Right. Bencomo: Which is kind of scary for a city government to take on and ... Lakey: Well that's what El Paso ... Bencomo: Citizens, so if, if, I, 1 just see a lot of potential in this and what we could do with a bike share program, just slowly spread it through the city, especially in the District 2 area around NMSU. Lakey: Right. Bencomo: Cause there's a lot of students that live outside of there that would still have to, they wouldn't even have to drive there. They could just take a bike from wherever they're at so ... Lakey: Well and there's a lot of international students that come in that buy bikes every semester and then when they leave they, they either abandon them or they get rid of them and that's why most of the international, and we have a high international at NMSU, students at NMSU. So a lot of them are really in support of it cause then they can just pay the fee every semester and have a bike to use and not have to worry about maintenance and everything else because it would be there for them and not have to buy one every semester. Bencomo: Okay. Thank you Mr. Chair. Curry: Mr. Chair. May I ask my list of questions? Pearson: Sure. Lakey: Go for it. Curry: Thank you. So, so some of them may, may be you know obvious but if the City uses the same bike share program can bikes be returned, you know could they be checked out at City Hall and returned ... 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Lakey: They're compatible, yes. Curry: Compatible. Okay. And then if somebody wanted to take the bike home and they intended to dock it at the docking station but they went home with it overnight, I mean can they sort of, when does it kick in that, that charges them $700 for the bicycle? Lakey: That's a good question. Curry: So if they just didn't make it home and it's raining and they think, "I'm not going to take it to the bike docking station," are they allowed to keep it for an extended period? Shearer: Yeah. They, they ... Lakey: I think it, isn't it ... Shearer: There'd be a day rate for it. Lakey: A three-day? Shearer: But yeah I, 1 think that one of them had three days it was missing and they Lakey: Yeah. Curry: Okay. Shearer: Charging it out then. Curry: Okay, so and then what's the flats and repairs and you know things that go wrong, just maintenance on bicycles, who takes care of that? Lakey: So it depends on the company. If it's Zagster they actually have somebody that, they have a number on the bike to where whoever's riding the bike can just call the number and they'll send somebody out to repair it. But normally they contract with a local person. Curry: Okay. Lakey: That will go out and repair the bikes. Curry: Okay, super. And then two more, two ... Shearer: That, that cost has been sort of figured in and so ... 21 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Curry: So there's that, okay. Shearer: Yeah, they tried to figure that for the ones that didn't have the, all the advantages of Zagster we went, we got some estimates of what it would cost for ... Curry: Okay. Shearer: Hundred bikes, local vendor to... Lakey: Yeah. Shearer: To repair them and ... Curry: Sorry. Shearer: And they were still, need someone to try and ... Curry: Yeah. Shearer: Shift it back so we were looking for ASNMSU or one of the groups to sort of oversee the, the operation but again it's hard to estimate the exact cost but we've tried to fit that into the five-year plan. Curry: Okay. Super. So a couple other quick questions. Is there an legal side to bike share? I mean if somebody had an accident on the bicycle I mean could they ... Lakey: So the insurance comes when you, when you purchase the bikes and everything there's an insurance that comes with it. Curry: Okay. Lakey: That you ... Curry: Okay, Great. Lakey: Purchase along with it and they also, they suggest promoting safe riding practices and bringing a helmet and all the other stuff when they first get onto the bikes. Curry: Well that actually brought up my, my next, my final point was is there some way that there could be some education that if they you know did a class or they filled an online you know bike webinar kind of thing and they answered questions that they could get a discount and say, "You know if you want to get some bike education or come to a class then you can get 22 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 l0 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 a discount on your, you know semester renting," or something. And that way you know that people would get some education and you wouldn't just have a bunch of people riding the wrong way down the road or whatever else. Lakey: That's true. Curry: So just a thought. Lakey: No, actually that's a good idea. Shearer: These bikes have got GPS on them. They can't be ridden the wrong way down the street. Lakey: Oh, you're so ... Shearer: They're self -driving. Lakey: There are some actual companies, not the two that we looked at but there's other companies that actually offer bikes that are motorized as well but they're, it's a lot more expensive for those ones. Curry: Thank you. Lakey: Was there any other questions? Rochelle: Mr. Chairman. I had a question. And, and Jamie is the, the annual fee, what's the, what does that include? Does that include maintenance costs and things like that or, okay. Lakey: That's why, so we, with each company we did a five-year plan. Rochelle: Right. Lakey: In it we made sure we put like depreciation, repairs, all of that on there to where it would cover the cost so with Collegiate every year it's about I think $40,000. 1 could be off with my numbers but it's a, it's, it's not a lot. Rochelle: I think you have $25,000 listed. Lakey: Was it 25? Rochelle: Yeah. Lakey: Oh, that was for 100. Okay. And then for Zagster it's just the same every year. 23 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 Rochelle: Right and that, that's also because Zagster is much more technologically savvy? Lakey: Yes. They do a lot more. But either, either way with both companies you would still need to have, hire someone that's specifically in charge of relocating the bikes and main, and checking the systems and finding out where everything is and all of that. Rochelle: Yeah that makes sense Lakey: Where the high traffic use is. So you would still need, I mean I think it's a, it's a fulltime job for one person for bicycle safety, pedestrian safety, all of that. So it could be something, so we suggested that for the Faculty Senate is that they create a position just for someone to maintain the bike share and take on the bicycle safety and everything else. Because right now they have the, someone doing it that's doing other jobs as well and they can't give all their attention to where it's needed. Rochelle: I just want to add that I'm really very much in favor of this program and I would like to see it expand ultimately into the city. I mean having experienced it in a number of other large cities this is, it's, it increases the, the use of bicycles across the boards. Lakey: Yeah. Rochelle: You know, not just the use of rental facilities so thank you. Lakey: And then it, with El Paso cause you had mentioned something earlier about starting out small. El Paso I think only has maybe two or three stations right now so they're ... Pearson: They've got ... Lakey: Starting out. Pearson: More than that. It's ... Lakey: Do they have more now? Pearson: Closer to ten. Lakey: They have ten now? Cause I know that when I Pearson: Seven to ten. 24 I Lakey: First heard about it they set up a couple so I haven't actually seen it but 2 yeah, so they're really small right now. They're not that big yet. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Bencomo: Mr. Chair. I'm sorry. One more comment then I'll, promise IT shut up. Pearson: Yeah. Bencomo: Just the, the, the, and what I mentioned earlier, I failed to mention I was excited about the City possibly starting to increment this, but also the County. The NMSU borders ... Lakey: Yes. Bencomo: The City and the County. With all the governments working together, NMSU side and the City and County I think it could, it could work a little, probably be even less costly by doing that and joining together so. Lakey: And I think it would go well with the, with our bus system as well since we have the bike racks and stuff to where people could catch the bus from one place to the other and then pick up a bike at maybe like one of the main terminals or something and then ride the bike through the city and stuff. So I think that would be beneficial to have something in the city over there, but is there any other questions? Nunez: Mr. Chair. I do. The, some of your numbers Lakey: Are off. Nunez: Well, no I'm not saying that Lakey: Oh. Nunez: I was thinking the, to, to make them stronger and to make this when it comes down to like a student and actually talking of the fees and actually ASNMSU it'd be I think to your advantage if you firm those up and 1, and 1, and I got a suggestion for that but then I, it, (inaudible) question that you, you should also look to these companies and find out if you can get to your branch campuses and even maybe the study. Cause NMSU owns property throughout the city, and that's my point. So that if you can get it, those stations you could actually maybe get ahead cause you are so much ahead of the County and the City and everywhere else. So if you can do that then that scatters the stations out. So in addition, see it's almost like you need a proposal. You need to write what your proposal is and then get the quotes from the companies so you have stronger and better numbers. 25 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Lakey: Well I have ... Nunez: Because even at your 10 stations they, those are close. That is whatever the radius of the campus is ... Lakey: Right. Nunez: Which is only what two-mile radius or something is that and then the city you would want to maybe go out to like, is, know those costs for the seven -mile radius or whatever that is. So that's my suggestion. Lakey: Okay. Nunez: So that you could spread it out and be in front of whomever else, like the County or the City. And then, well anyway thought, forgot my other thought. But I mean I can, somebody can go ahead and then I can re - gather my thought. Pearson: Lance. Shepan: Is there any data on the actual usage on campuses? Lakey: On which campuses? On any of the campuses? Shepan: Yes. Lakey: They have, if you talk to the campuses personally, whoever's in charge of it, in charge of the program you can get data from them if they're willing to share it with you because each system tells you how many bikes are used, how much they're used, where they're relocated. It has a system that shows you where they're picked up and everything. So you can get data if you talk to the people in charge at the different universities. Shearer: Yeah. Lakey: And if they're willing to share. Shearer: Yeah. Lakey: Some people aren't willing to share. Shearer: Yeah. We haven't really collected that much data cause it, it is sort of proprietary, some of the bikes, Zagster I'm sure they don't share much of their data but the individual areas where they're more deeply involved in running the program should have that information, but again it, it ... 26 I Pearson: But it's a 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Shearer: It varies a lot. Pearson: General data point, bike shares and there's been more than a million miles ridden in bike share with zero fatalities nationally so at that level it's reasonably safe. I mean it's ... Shearer: So, so, so far this is like, Jamie and the, the bike -friendly task force in, in trying to get this sort of together so we've had help from business class and help from several groups here in trying to get the information together so we're sort of creeping forward and we've seen to have some interest now from ASNMSU, the, the student organizations and we're trying to like I say get it as reasonably priced, if we had money to just simply to throw at Zagster that'd be the great thing cause they can just take care of everybody but we're just afraid that would you know go along and then bomb, you know the cost too much and no one's using it and da, da, da, da so we're looking for something looks like it could be used or at least in the university and possibly have some connect -ability to the City if they, they chose one that was similar. So again it, we're, we, it is moving forward just but little bits and pieces, we're trying to get the information out there cause we found so much variability between companies. It's the cost you know and do you want a Cadillac or do you want you know something that you can ride around but you have to bring back to the same station. That was like I said the cheapest and then the, the alternate is, is currently now Outdoor Adventures. You know they've been renting out bikes on a, a semester basis and it sort of works but ... Lakey: Not (inaudible). Shearer: Yeah, you know still some problems with that so again this has been an exploration in trying to figure out what the heck it takes to, to, to, to run a bike share. Is, is, is it reasonable and is it something that would go at NMSU and continue to go, so that's where we are. Lakey: So to add on that I am working with Dr. Bole, if any of you know him. And he has a ... _ Shearer: Business faculty. Lakey: He's a, he's a faculty in the Business College and he has a high interest into this so each semester he gives me a group of students to work on it and to collect data and get, gain more support. That's why ASNMSU is getting bill written because one of his students is actually one of the senators on ASNMSU. So it's actually helping move it along a little bit further. So each semester he gives me a couple of groups of students to 27 work on different bike activities. So and he's, has a high interest in it and he wants to get it pushed forward as soon as possible. 3 4 Nunez: Two quick points please. If I, thank you Mr. Chair. I was going to say that 5 1 did hear the presentation at the recent Planning and Engineering 6 Conference. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Lakey: Yeah. Nunez: That, I did hear Albuquerque the personnel, the people there and talk about how they have a contract with Zagster and one of the reasons ... Lakey: Right. Nunez: They're so expensive is cause they replace all the bikes every year. But, but, my, the point I was going to make earlier is just that the Idaho test, or the facility right there anyway, on West Idaho by 1-25, that's NMSU property and that's what I meant is bout scattering and finding the different places that NMSU owns so that you could see. Lakey: To place stations at. Nunez: And get the quotes from, those, those company might be a value. The other thing is, is that with Albuquerque about 800,000 or and I think El Paso is 600,000 people we're a fraction of that about 100,000. So have we looked to and it'd be nice if we had a model of a, of an, a community that just like ours with an, a campus. Lakey: A smaller community. Nunez: And that may be of value for also the proposals and amount of money at a successful size to know how big that is so with these companies we have that you were talking to, it would be nice to know what you know City XYZ, whatever the name of the city is, that's a success in that size. Like you said Dave I don't want it, if you're gonna to kick it off you don't want it to fail. Lakey: Right Nunez: So, so anyway those are my comments. Thank you Mr. Chair. Pearson: Okay. Yeah my question's I guess if you've identified any locations outside of campus that would be useful destinations. I had heard they were talking about shutting down the United States Postal station on campus and moving it to Idaho-Solano area. That would make perfect sense to have a bike share there for people that, otherwise they'd have a much more difficult time getting to that station if they actually change that 28 Post Office. And there, Town of Mesilla maybe, have you looked at partners with other, other groups? Town of Mesilla might be worthwhile to set a station. Maybe they, I don't know where they get funding, maybe it could come through transportation enhancements to get funding for something like that. Then Chamber of Commerce is in, interested in this type of idea and then partnering with City of Las Cruces or, or complementing, working with them and if you identify destinations, Mesilla Valley Mall, Wal-Mart. Lakey: Yeah, Wal-Mart Pearson: Albertson's. Lakey: Yeah. I was thinking places where there, the students and people are going to buy food. Pearson: Right. Even as close as Toucans. Lakey: And people are going to shop, yeah. And then someone had suggested having something at Milagro's. Pearson: Which is Toucan's. Lakey: Oh yeah. Well it's close, yeah. Pearson: At, at that shopping center. Lakey: You're right. So because Milagro's has a lot of people that come in, a lot of cyclists ... Pearson: Right. Lakey: And people that ride bikes that come over there. Pearson: Inaudible Lakey: Is it really? Nunez: Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yes. Lakey: Okay. Nunez: So that we're ahead, yeah. Pearson: Is there anybody from the public that wants to comment on this? Andy. 29 I Nunez: Sorry. 2 3 Bachman: Good afternoon everybody. I'm Kan Bachman with Dona Ana Place 4 Matters. Mr. Chair, Members of the Committee. I appreciate the 5 opportunity to, to ask some questions and provide some additional 6 information today. First, to tell you a little bit about Dona Ana Place Matters we are a group that works on health equity and for those of you not familiar with that term, health equity basically is anything that we do and anything in our environment that can make us healthy. And so you can understand why I'm interested in bikes, pedestrians and multiuse trails and bike share programs. I have been in the, in this position just about six months. But when I came in we were actually in the process of, of basically wrapping up a health impact assessment where we looked at parks and multiuse trails in the County of Dona Ana and if any of you are interested in that study I'm happy to share that electronically or can get that to you in a hard copy as well. I've got some fact sheets about that today. 20 But I'd, I'd like to highlight a couple of points that Ms. Lakey mentioned 21 and then also that Mr. Nunez mentioned. I was also at the presentation by 22 the folks in Albuquerque who use Zagster and was very impressed with it. 23 I'm not you know being paid for any kind of promotional information that 24 I'm giving and in fact I don't want to promote them specifically but I do 25 really recommend that these programs actually change very frequently the 26 types of services that they offer. The different companies that provide 27 these services are constantly changing and I think it would really behoove 28 us not to narrow down the, the options at this point, especially if you all 29 and it sounds like you're very favorable to the idea are looking at 30 something wider which I would highly recommend as well. Mr. Bencomo 31 mentioned earlier the importance of connectivity especially for our, our 32 residents in the colonias who do not have a lot of transportation options. 33 They're going to be getting some more options obviously with the new bus 34 routes that are going to be running. But how do we encourage and, 35 encourage them to be able to have alternatives to those buses as well and 36 can we look as the MPO has suggested in their plan at bike share that 37 would actually connect with the bus routes in the city? Perhaps bike 38 lockers as well which are really necessary and, and help give people a 39 sense of security who may not be you know sort of your avid bikers who, 40 "Am I going to leave this and is it going to be okay?" And that's obviously 41 different from bike share. But again the need for connectivity is really 42 important. I think EBID is really a critical partner and I'm encouraged to 43 hear that they may be actually interested in, in that sort of University 44 corridor and working with you know development of some right-of-way 45 there. And I'd like to see that extended throughout the county. In fact our 46 studies show that if we could do that we'd really increase connectivity and 30 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 people would be much more, over half of people would actually be within walking distance of parks and, and multiuse trails if we could just get EBID and some of that shared use happening with the schools as well. I, 1 guess a couple of comments on bike share: I'd, I'd encourage that we look at it as a system as a community, cities, county, NMSU all together. But we need to also think about building a critical mass for bike ridership and, and so I think that bike share has the opportunity to do that because what it does is it introduces more people to the realities of biking in our city. This is not going to be probably taking other bikes off the road. It's going to be bringing more bikes and more riders onto the road and it's as Ms. Curry recommended, an opportunity for more bikes, bicycle education which I think is really critical in our community both for cyclists as well as for motorists. So I think that in itself is a, is a really positive thing. We get more people on the road, more people will be advocating for these trails and, and multiuse trails and bike lanes. The one thing that I did notice and Mr. Nunez may remember this as well, in the presentation at the APA meeting here a few weeks ago, Albuquerque's model is successful in part because there are business sponsors. And the Zagster model actually you can get I, if I'm remembering correctly a rack that holds ten bicycles and seven bicycles for $7,500 a year. And for businesses they're actually seeing that that's driving business to their locations and so I think we could sell this. We're sometimes seen as, those of us in the health community as being antagonistic to business but I think this is an opportunity to sort of reach across the aisle and say, "Hey, Chambers work with us. Business owners work with us on this." And I think that would be very positive in terms of building some support for our movement. I'd also like to see perhaps we think about starting off pretty small. Rather than doing a feasibility study the folks in Albuquerque just went and boom, they just started. And they said, "Let's start with a few stations and a few bikes, see how it works." Because they went with Zagster they could see where the bikes were being ridden, they can add more stations based on where those bikes are going, and it's easy to expand out from that. You're not wasting money on a feasibility study but you can actually start and get that critical mass happening. I'd also like to see and would, would encourage us to think a little bit outside of the box as well, we have a large population of people who do not have access to motor vehicles. It's nice for those of us who do have access to have, you know and many students have access too but we have a tent city, folks who are really in need of transportation to get to medical appointments, to get to jobs, and this could really help and I'd, I'd like to sort of think a, let us think about working with other communities about where to site these stations and not just sort of the typical suspects. 31 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 And finally I would reiterate what Mr. Nunez said. I think we really have a need for some hard numbers and it'd be nice to actually see an RFP put together and then we could actually go to some of these companies. So I appreciate your interest and I'm, I'm heartened to hear that you're all, you're, many of you are quite interested. If you have any questions I'd be happy to take those at this time. Curry: Well it, Mr. Chair if I may, I always have a comment. So Ms. Bachman I think that it's really, it's really great and I really see your point. I think that there's also a need in our community and, and there is sort of a, a little bit of grass -roots discussion going on that's for a community bike shop. Cause I really, I'm looking at this thinking, "If you live in a colonia and, or you live in tent city do you have a credit card that you can put down to cover the $700 if your bike gets lost or stolen?" Which is you know I think crime and those kinds of things are more likely in, in those higher need areas as well and so I think that even partnering this idea together with a community bike shop that gives those people access to own their own bicycle and build and repair their own bikes and things like that is, is something that really should be brought up so not only you know getting the people who can afford a bike share because it is going to cost something, but then also something where somebody who is you know under -served could earn a bicycle or own a bicycle as well. So I think that when, when that group gets a, gets a little bit more information together I think we should really make sure that Place Matters knows about that and helps with that too. Bachman: Thank you so much and that's a very good reminder. I'd encourage folks to look at the Silver City bike share model as well which has been, is really innovative and I think they're doing a great job and they actually even outreach to Palomas as well. So there are a lot of things that we can do regionally I think and not just limit it to you know NMSU or, or the campus. I mean in Albuquerque one of the things that they're working on is actually trying to get connectivity with the Rail Runner and then do a similar system in Santa Fe so that you could have a seamless connection there with the same company. Rochelle: Mr. Chair. I didn't realize that Ms. Curry was going to make my comment. I was going to make a comment, right. I, I'm, I'm one of the people who has been trying to explore the possibility of a, of a earn -a -bike program here. I was involved in one for 14 years in another community that was highly successful and it, that community was just about the same size as, as Las Cruces. And so it, it seems feasible to try to pull something like that together and you were on my agenda for people to connect with as a matter of fact so we'll be in touch. Bachman: Wonderful. 32 Pearson: Okay. Thank you. Bachman: Thank you very much. Pearson: Andy. Hume: Good afternoon or evening I guess Mr. Chair, Members of the Committee. Andy Hume, Downtown Planning and Development Coordinator for the City of Las Cruces. It's been a while since I've been back here. It's good to see a whole lot of familiar faces. First thing I'd like to say is I'm glad I was sitting down when the words "buffered bike lane" were uttered in this. This is, that's fascinating. That's excellent. I'm glad to hear that. Next step is road diet down the rest of Alameda so that's still the windmill I'm tilting at right now but anyway. 16 As certain roles within the Community Development Department are 17 shifting around a little bit I, 1 find sort of full circle coming back around over 18 to, to me and my group. I want to introduce Armando Morales. He is a 19 new Associate Planner with Community Development and he will be 20 working with me primarily on downtown issues and historic preservation. 21 Also in the audience if you haven't met him yet is Brian Byrd who's a 22 Planner over in the Long -Range Planning section and the three of us are 23 going to be doing a lot of collaborating on bicycle and pedestrian issues 24 for the, specifically for the City of Las Cruces moving forward. One of the features that we had previously, some of you may remember this is the Bicycle -Friendly Community Task Force. It's had a little bit of, a little bit of a hiatus lately but we're looking to bring that back. That is a, as some of you may remember is a, it's a community -based group that we partner with to work on the five or six E's now it is. It's been a little while since I've been out of the game but working on those things and, and bringing a lot more attention to the issues that are going on. We've had a lot of success with it in the past and we look forward to bringing that back into full operation here over the course of the, in, in the, in the, in the recent, in the near future. 37 One of the things I want to do and, and when you follow up Kari Bachman 38 it's very difficult to have, she, she covers things so very well. But one of 39 things I want to stress is the idea that she brought up about using the RFP 40 process. For governments the Request for Proposals or in some cases 41 the city also has a Request for Information, an RFI process where we're 42 not necessarily guaranteeing we're going forward with a success for 43 proposal but we are gathering that information. It's a very good process 44 for us to use in government sector because it allows us to give of a wide 45 distribution of information or request for formation to a lot of different 46 companies and hopefully achieve what you mentioned James. I thought it 33 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 was a very good point getting some of those numbers down to a much finer grain so you can as close as possible compare apples to apples. I, 1 think one of the things that's most confusing about cell phone companies is it's really hard to do that and pin them down to say, "How much will I, 1 pay?" and compare that. Well it seems to me there's maybe some similarity to their pricing structures and the way that they try to charge you for one thing but not another and, and like cell phone companies do. But we have an opportunity I think to get those numbers more firm. What I would suggest and, and Dave I'll be more than happy to work with you and Jamie on this and, and, and your bicycle -friendly community group as well is perhaps it's something that we could partner on. The City could lead the, the Request for Information but then we can, we can ask for the information based on a much larger project so we could ask for you know the 100 or 150 bicycles or, however that would work with the County as well and gather that from, and just from a, a you know a, what's the, there's a term and I forget, scale. It's a, it's a, yes. Economy of scale, thank you. So then maybe that's something that we can partner with and that way we can get a better view from a larger picture what that'll look like. We don't have to tell them where they're, where we're putting them. That's, that's our business to worry about. We can just worry about maybe trying to get some apples to apples comparison. So just wanted to share that Mr. Chair and I'll be happy to answer any questions if there are any. Pearson: I think we'd be excited to work with the City in something like that. Hume: Okay. Very good. Thanks. Herrera: Mr. Chair. I don't have a question. I just had a comment I guess to follow that up sort of. A hundred bikes for the NMSU campus seems like a lot to me just based on what El Paso's been doing, they have started out sort of small, smallish I guess and it just, it seems like until we have data on where those bikes are going, what the actual use is, it's going to be really hard tojustify increasing fees. Pearson: Probably heard the presentations of the El Paso's this Herrera: I have. Yeah, all, all of them. Pearson: Can you tell us, do you remember how many stations and how many bikes they have right now in their initial? Herrera: I want to say that their final master plan is 26 stations. I don't remember exactly how many bikes. They're hoping that that is successful and then they want to look at expanding it into New Mexico as well so it'll reach Sunland Park and Anthony and that area. 34 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Pearson: So they started now with 26 or they're now closer to ten or 12? Herrera: No, I think they have half of them installed, yeah. Pearson: Twelve-ish, 12 or 13, right? Herrera: Right. And so obviously they've got a lot more money to spend but it seems like the company they chose to go with was pretty reasonable in price and I don't know. It might be worth talking to them at least if we ... Pearson: It might be worth making sure the possibility that we're compatible with their system so that we get UTEP students and they get NMSU's ... Lakey: They, they did choose to use BCycles, right? Shearer: BCycles, yeah. They were ... Lakey: Yeah, Cause I, 1 ... Shearer: They were a little pricier. Lakey: I actually had BCycles come out and do an estimate at NMSU. But they wanted a lot for NMSU. A lot more than Zagster did. But yes I, 1 actually have a number for someone at UTEP that is working with the bike share so I can contact them and find out exactly what they're doing. Herrera: Yeah. Just it would be good to share information at, at the very least with El Paso MPO cause they've done a lot of research. It took them I think two and a half years to get their bike share program approved and up and running so. Pearson: Cause they were initially, was it a $2 or $3 million program? Lakey: Yeah. And they lost the funding. Pearson: Then scaled back to half a million dollars? Herrera: $800,000. Pearson: $800,000. Herrera: And then I think the City put in some so it's probably just under a million now. And ... Pearson: And so to compare is that a five-year cost? Herrera: I think for five years. 35 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Pearson: Okay. So not much more than double-ish that the, what the numbers are here. Okay. Anybody else have comments or questions? Shepan: Just one question Mr. Chair. Are these bikes the, the ones in the picture look like beach cruisers. Are these single speed or are these multi speed bikes? Lakey: You have the option of getting single speed or getting multiple speed. It depends on what you choose. Shepan: It just ... Lakey: And then it, depending on which company you choose they have some use drive shafts and some use the chains. Shepan: Right. Just our topography here, a single speed bike would be rough. Lakey: Wouldn't work very well. Yeah so ... Shepan: Coming downhill ... Lakey: That's what we ... Shepan: Would be easy. Lakey: Had looked at, we had ... Shepan: Going up ... Lakey: Getting, get, looked at getting some that have different gears because it would be easier especially with the university is rolling kind of. Shepan: Right. Lakey: So it'd be better to get them with gears. Shepan: Thank you. Pearson: Okay. 6.3 Bicycle Loop Discussion Pearson: On to the next item which is 6.3: Bicycle Loop Discussion. It says Chair so I know where this came from, was some of my comments about being able to use specifically the traffic, to be able to cross and have traffic light, signal light discovery of the bicycles at Las Cruces Avenue and Alameda and Water. So does staff have some more information about this? 36 I Murphy: 2 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Mr., Mr. Chair. I actually, I had forgotten to follow up with last, last I, 1 get to kind of back up, share with the whole, whole Committee. I met, met you out there after the last meeting and then contacted the traffic engineer and they tested it and did, it does indeed not work like you said it does not work. And, and they tested, they tried, they tried to adjust the sensitivity to it and, and the answer to it was already on max, maximum sensitivity and the last, last thing I, last response I remember (inaudible) I said, the administrator said to you know if, if it's broken we need, you know it needs to be fixed. And then I got dropped out of the conversation if that, if that conversation continued amongst street staff and I forgot to follow-up with them and see if they had a resolution to that or, or if they have a scheduled repair date. Pearson: Because it's a more general, it's a general system -wide problem where it sometimes either is no knowledge of where bicycles should go to set off the detectors, they use, there're different types of detectors. I know there's one place where there's, they use a radar system. There are different places they use camera systems and camera systems seem in my experience mostly work although I, seems like I've had troubles from time to time, different locations that I can't recall where they are right now. But maybe as part of this we should have a more general discussion also to make sure that bicycles can actually activate the traffic signals. Murphy: And I, I, 1 think for, for further you know a, a, a future, future agenda item is you know we, we might want to ask them where, you know not only the City but the, the County where do they expect to go you know I, 1 think that the, the use of cameras and, and other you know radar detectors up there are more recent than the loops and whether the industry is moving away from that or, or, and towards cameras and that'd be something I think would be illuminating for us doing the planning. You know if, if loops, if induction loops are indeed going away because ... Pearson: Maybe we can prioritize those replacements where we have bicycle facilities. Murphy: That's correct and ... Pearson: Because part of the discussion back when we were doing the, the bicycle - friendly community discussion, I'm talking about the ordinances, this topic came up, should we have a Idaho stop kind of thing or exceptions for non- responsive traffic signals and the discussions I recall then was, "No. Let's not mess with the law but let's make sure that these signals work." And so I don't know that we've progressed past that. Do you have something Andy? Hume: Mr. Chair, Members of the Committee. The, the specific intersection at Church, or not Church, Water and Las Cruces is part of a project that is 37 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 going to be undertaken, preliminary project scoping and surveying is underway at this point in time for a conversion of Church and Water back to two-way streets. Part of that is going to be upgrading the infrastructure. I believe if memory serves that is the, that intersection has the oldest signal structure or signal infrastructure in the entire city. So one of the things that we'll be interested in seeing is when you go back from, when you go from one-way to two-way travel you have to, you only have lights facing in one direction so we need to put those in both directions. And so what we can do is make sure that there's opportunity for input on that design. Pearson: Right. Hume: And be able to hopefully as, as Mr. Murphy pointed out use the most up- to-date technology so that that's more sensitive. Pearson: You might be able to go to cameras for all four ways in that ... Hume: Yeah. Pearson: Intersection then. Hume: So I just wanted to let you know that project's being fast -tracked so we're, we're probably looking early next year for trying to go to construction early next year so we'll keep you informed on that. Pearson: Right. It's, while, while we're talking about that project, some of the designs, I've heard changing, adding parking with the back -in parking instead so there also might be opportunities for bicycle facilities on those roadways. It'd be interesting, it'd be nice to be part of that loop or the design or hear about it. Hume: Yeah. Mr. Chair, Members of the Committee. We had a design charrette in October of 2013 and so that was, the, that, the results of that charrette were accepted by City Council. A lot of the things too, as, as we've had a chance to talk over time on bicycle facilities, in the downtown area where you really try to slow traffic down having separate bicycle lanes is perhaps a little less practical in those areas especially when you have ... Pearson: Right Hume: On -street parking and so looking at those is, and we have constrained right-of-way in those areas as well. So our goal is to try and reduce travel speeds and, and really calm traffic to the point where cycling really interacts well with the entire environment so ... 39 Pearson: Right. Main Street ... Hume: We'll, but we'll keep an eye on that. Pearson: Main Street's at 15 miles an hour, it makes sense that Las Cruces Avenue between Campo and Alameda is 15 miles an hour. That's something maybe to look at ... Hume: Sure. Pearson: During that whole design phase. Hume: Very good. Thank you. Pearson: And also the Transportation Plan has the idea of a bicycle boulevard through the area someplace and that still needs to be further identified maybe as part of this project. That could be identified through the downtown area. Hume: We certainly we, will be partnering with the MPO on, on the design as it goes along. Thank you. Pearson: Okay. Any other comments on this? 7. COMMITTEE AND STAFF COMMENTS 7.1 MPO Staff Update: SRTP update, University Study Corridor Update Pearson: Let's go on to Committee and Staff Comments. McAdams: Yes Mr. Chair. Let me just get up to microphone. Just to, we've already updated on the University Avenue thing. I think we're, we're going ahead the, with that. We'll send it on we said to the Technical Committee and then the Policy Committee. The Short -Range Transit Plan is going away after, going right away. We're going to be hopefully getting things together to have it presented in the second week of November I think. We're headed toward that so it's, and then we can, we'll talk about how that's going so it's very positive. And that's, that's all I have. Is anything else, it, I, 1 can't think of anything else at this moment. Pearson: Okay. Herrera: Mr. Chair. I have a question about that. It's going to be presented where? 39 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 McAdams: For the City. Since the City, the RoadRUNNER system is a City, is contract for the City, for the City Council. Herrera: Okay. McAdams: And that's (inaudible) to go ahead with, with, they've are been given a presentation and a workshop and a presentation. This'll be for actually adopting the first phase and to arrange what kind of other start, startup adjustments in the budget needs to be made too. So we're just waiting for a few more details before we go to the City. Herrera: Thank you. Pearson: Okay. 7.2 Local Projects update Pearson: So we'll just go down the list for local projects. City of Las Cruces do you have any project updates for us? Nunez: The La Llorona Trail going north from Picacho is about 70% complete to the outfall channel. And then the Dam Trail project is, the bids are in and we sent off to NMDOT for approval and so it's still on, on schedule to start mid -December in construction. Pearson: On the presentation for that there were the main plan, option one, option two which expanded that. Did the bids come in that included the extra options or did the bids just come in for the base plan, do you know? Nunez: From what I remember it, that we were able to do them all. Does anyone else remember anything about, oh I, 1 believe that's the case. I can double-check on that. And then there's no new projects. The ones I mentioned last time were pretty much done. The construction on Amador ADA McSwain to Archuleta and so I'll, I'll stop there. Pearson: Okay. Doria Ana County we don't have a representative. Town of Mesilla do you have any updates, projects or anything? Okay. NMSU any further comments? Shearer: Projects no. We, we have something called a homecoming coming up this weekend and the Bike -Friendly University is going to have an entry in the parade so if anyone's interested in bringing their bike and riding that terrible down, long distance from the top, top of the hill down to the bottom you're, you're welcome to come. We're inviting anyone to come if they want to ride with us in the parade. We are having a family in a, the fifth, third or some, Third Annual Bike, Family Bike Event. We've got the City 40 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Codes and, and so on for some youth training, safety training that same day around noon. So those are events coming up right now. Thank you. Pearson: Okay. 7.3 NMDOT Projects update Pearson: NMSU update, or NMDOT updates. Herrera: Thank you Mr. Chair. I'll just go down the list here. North Main, we're supposed to be done by the end of this month, fingers crossed. It's looking good out there. There's just a couple of things that need to be finalized, some of the signing, striping, things like that so as of this second right now we're on track for the end of the month. Okay. The next project is the Missouri bridge. That's coming along pretty well. The original goal of the contractor was to be finished by the end of December. It looks like they're probably going to be done by the end of January but still that's about three or four months ahead of schedule so they're still doing really well on that. Pearson: On that project there was where the multiuse trail is and there's that culvert. The last time I was there which has been a couple weeks maybe there didn't seem to be any activity. Is that still ... Herrera: I have that on my notes because I didn't update you all on that. I was looking through the last packet. I did talk to the project manager. He did tell me that the path is going to be widened back out to ten feet. So that culvert is temporary during construction. I know it looks permanent but they are going to make sure that the path is still ten feet wide because it is very narrow right now so. Pearson: Yeah. Herrera: Yeah. Yeah. Nonexistent. Pearson: Not even walk -able I think. Lakey: Yeah Herrera: Right. I think it's two and a half feet. I went and measured it but yeah. That will be back up to normal ten feet. Pearson: Yeah if you can keep us on track, well it'll be January, the project might be done by the time we meet again. 41 I Herrera: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 Pearson: Herrera: Pearson: Yeah. Hopefully, fingers crossed, right. If you've got questions though in the interim just please always feel free to e-mail me and I can get answers on, on that kind of stuff. The Union project is coming along. There aren't any delays. They had 240 working days so we're looking at finishing that up probably in the spring of 2016. That'll be followed up by a pavement preservation on 1-10 that goes from basically the Jackrabbit interchange to 1-10/1-25 interchange to sort of take care of some of the pavement in between all of the bridge replacement projects. So once we've done that we'll be all done hopefully on 1-10 for a while through Las Cruces. And then one other project, it's the US 70 over San Augustin Pass. The RFP for that went out in July. Proposals are due on the 27th of October so we should be starting design for that hopefully in the next couple of months. I did ask the project development engineer to make sure that this Committee is kept updated on what's happening with that and to include at least a presentation about what's happening. I think you were a part of the RSA Committee so there were several ideas in there about how to configure the bike lanes. I had some questions from some of the consultants about that already so I imagine that as development starts happening we'll have conversations about where we want the bike lanes on the inside of the wall barrier, on the outside. So there's probably some things to think about. If you all haven't had a chance to look at the road safety audit please let me know and I will send that to you so at least you can be familiar with what it is that we're talking about. And those are all the updates I have unless there's any specific questions. Valley Drive is pretty much on hold? Valley Drive is not on hold. We're moving forward. The Amador Proximo was accepted by the City Council so the DOT is working with the Public Works Department on that. That's about all I know but it's not on hold. Okay. But to encourage a design that includes a protected bike lane would we talk to City Council? Cause basically we need more funds to do that. Is that ... Herrera: The buffered bike lane on the roadway? On Valley Drive? Pearson: Yeah. The Amador Proximo, Proximo design suggestion. Herrera: Yes. So to implement some of the elements in the Amador Proximo the City would need to participate in the funding. We've set our budget at $11 million. That's enough to cover basically everything that we want to do on 42 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 Valley Drive to include buffered bike lanes. So it's a five-foot bike lane, a two -foot buffer, and then the, the travel lanes. Pearson: Protected bike lane with a separate ... Herrera: Right. The separate ... Pearson: Road is what the Amador Proximo is talking about so that's, so to continue that we really need to talk to City about that. Herrera: Yes. Pearson: Okay. So that's valid point. Thank you. Okay Herrera: Other questions? No. Pearson: Okay. Any Committee Members have comments? Okay. I guess the other, only other comment that I have is New Mexico Bicycle Educators are going to have in April next year a bicycle summit and it's going to be in Las Cruces and we have the date, April 23rd. We're, instead of previous summits we called the Bicycle Education Summit and that kind of scared some people away so it's going to be just the New Mexico Bike Summit. We do intend to cover some different areas, tourism, bike tourists, bike shares and I've, item of interest so things like that. We'll probably have four different topics or so. We don't have, we're still in very much the planning stage so I just want to make everybody aware that it's Las Cruces, April 23rd which is a Saturday, and we're going to try to make it of interest to the general bicycle community, planners, engineers, that kind of thing. 8. PUBLIC COMMENT Pearson: Okay. Now we have another opportunity for public comment. Anybody from the public wish to make a, any comments they wish to the Committee? Byrd: Chair, Committee. My name's Brian Byrd. I work with Planning Revitalization and I just wanted to have a general announcement. Currently we're working on a big community engagement initiative with the Comprehensive Plan. I just wanted to let you guys know that in about three weeks, the third week of November we'll be having a series of community engagement meetings at the district level, at the council district level. We're bringing in a consultant from Blue Zones and it will be Dan Burden who is a national walkability expert and so the idea's we're actually going be doing walk audits at different identified locations in each council district over a period of about six days and then we'll be having a closing 43 1 2 3 4 Pearson: 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Byrd: Pearson: Byrd: Nunez: Pearson: Nunez: Pearson: Nunez: meeting. And so I just like, would like you guys to keep your eyes peeled and it should be pretty exciting. Okay. Maybe we can ask staff to make sure that our Committee is notified of, of the events. Yeah. We have, we have you guys on our stakeholder list so ... Okay. We will definitely notify you of when those meetings will be. Okay. Thank you. Mr. Chair. I have a note here. Okay. You had asked in the last meeting about J. Paul Taylor School traffic, Safe Routes to School. Do you remember that? Right. At, are you talking about the one on Court Street right, not the Del Rey, the one on ... Pearson: Right. Yeah, the new location at the Nunez: Okay. Yeah. Just the, I know that we're planning this next year to do Court Street from Alameda down to I think Melendres. So we'll be doing the road reconstruction, drainage best we can and, and the pedestrian passage, the ramps repairs also. So I hope that answers the question. I, 1 know that the school, the old Court Middle School goes all the way around so I don't know the other joining street names but I don't know if that answers your question that you had that day in August. Pearson: I think what I, what I was asking about was if anticipated traffic patterns into the school, if they were going to try to, if they're going to use Mountain or Hadley or whatever because they've put in a, a, a, a traffic bay of some sort, a drop-off zone I believe off of I think it's Mountain was on that end. So how they expect the parents to get in, get in and out of the neighborhood using that was kind of where I was going with that. Nunez: All right. I'll go ask a better question then. So cause I do know that the, you're right. It's a joint project with the City. Maybe somebody else in here knows a little bit more about it than I do but I think it's with the schools right and the City. But we're both doing something in there. 44 Pearson: Well the school's been doing the construction. Nunez: Right. Pearson: And the City just has whatever responsibility for adding streets in the area. Nunez: Right. Right, right. And our right-of-way only goes up to whatever point so I'll, but you're talking about the, just so I know it's talking about the east side then of the property? Pearson: The, the drop-off bay's on the north side. Nunez: On the north, okay Pearson: Right. So that's, it looks like that's where they're expecting the drop-off for the J. Paul Taylor and Alma de Arte will still be there so they're probably going to continue using whatever they use. Nunez: All right. I'll look into it. Thanks. Pearson: Okay. 9. ADJOURNMENT (6:44 p.m.) Pearson: I guess we're ready for an adjournment. Herrera: So moved. Curry: Isecond. Pearson: Heard a motion and a second. We're adjourned. 1 Chairperson 45